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Central America

NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
Luis Ramos wants to go home to El Salvador. But he says that U. S. military aid to El Salvador and the U. S. military presence in Central America are ensuring that the conflict that drove him out of his homeland will drag on and on. Partly because of that belief, Ramos, a refugee who was granted political asylum in the United States this May, joined Saturday with about 100 demonstrators who maintain that the presence of American soldiers in...
NEWS
April 6, 1986
Jeane Kirkpatrick's magical ability to weave truth from the frayed slogans of the Reagan administration showed once again in her "Blinders are off" column on March 30. The blinders are not off Mrs. Kirkpatrick. She does tell us that opinion polls in Central America "establish that solid majorities of Costa Ricans and Hondurans believe it would be better for Nicaragua and for themselves if the contras won. " I'd like to know how an accurate poll can be done in countries where many of the people don't have phones.
NEWS
April 4, 1988
It has been a cruel, disorienting past month indeed for those who follow - or try to follow - the vagaries of Central America. Nicaragua, yesterday's hemispheric threat, has the new look of an island of calm, while its once- quiescent neighbors - Panama and El Salvador - edge toward the brink. They fill the turmoil-elsewhere columns; Daniel Ortega and the contras having quit the fray. In a burst of Easter bipartisanship, Congress now showers "humanitarian" largesse on the contras and the children maimed by the conflict.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer
Six people protesting U.S. involvement in Central America were arrested yesterday morning in Egg Harbor Township after climbing a fence near the entrance to the 177th Air National Guard Fighter-Interceptor Group's facility at Atlantic City International Airport in Pomona. Capt. Joseph Murphy of the Air National Guard said the six walked about a quarter-mile in the direction of a flight line where F-106s were parked, before the protesters were stopped by security police at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | By William F. Buckley Jr
The trouble with bad manners, Stendhal somewhere along the line apostrophized, "is that it can lead to crime. " It takes a certain amount of sleuthing to travel from remarks made by a bishop at the funeral of William J. Casey to log the distance between bad manners and crime, but it can be done. Totalitarian dictatorship is the greatest crime conceivable (totalitarian dictators killed about 30 million people - so far - under communism, a comparable number under Nazism and Maoism; more, even, under Pol Pot in Cambodia)
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By Alfonso Chardy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
From Brownsville to San Diego, a human hurricane is blowing in from Central America. A rising tide of undocumented immigrants - from Nicaragua, El Salvador, Panama, Honduras and Guatemala - is lapping along the 1,933-mile Mexican border, creating national alarm. Why? What is causing this influx? The refugees owe their plight to failures in U.S. foreign and domestic policies, according to a consensus of experts. Foreign policy setbacks ranging from suspension of military aid to the Nicaraguan contras to renewed political violence in El Salvador are cited by analysts - including those in the Reagan administration - as among the chief causes of the massive exodus from Central America.
NEWS
October 22, 1986 | BY ROBERT C. MAYNARD
Two academics were debating on television the other night when one became acutely exasperated with the lame position of his adversary. He wanted to call the other fellow stupid, but he contained himself, this being national television. So how did he unburden himself of his frustration? He called the other fellow's position "counter-intuitive. " Now there, I thought, was the most elegant way of calling somebody dumb I'd witnessed in a long time. Indeed, I thought of that wonderful formulation as the news burst upon us of an American C-123 going down in the remote reaches of Nicaragua loaded with ammunition and evidence of the clumsy hand of the CIA. "Counter-intuitive" is not a bad term to ascribe to the Reagan administration's ham-handed war in Central America.
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