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NEWS
September 1, 1997 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
We are about to enter upon the most important foreign policy debate this country has had since the gulf war. One might say the first foreign policy debate this country has had since the gulf war. No matter. We had better get used to thinking of something other than ourselves. The issue is NATO expansion. It ought to be an easy call. After all, we won the Cold War, and it was largely about control of Central Europe. How perverse to now disdain our winnings at the cashier's window.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau David Hess of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Declaring that "we stand at the beginning of a new era," President Bush proposed last night in his State of the Union address to make deeper cuts than those he favored earlier in U.S. and Soviet troop levels in Europe. "We recognize that the Soviet military threat in Europe is diminishing but we see little change in Soviet strategic modernization," he said. ". . . But the time is right to move forward on a conventional arms-control agreement to move us to more appropriate levels of military forces in Europe.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | By Michael D. Towle, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For two decades, workers at Lockheed Martin's plant in Fort Worth, Texas, built F-16 Falcon fighters that could shoot down MiGs deployed by the Soviet Union and its allies in central Europe. But last week Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic were invited to become NATO allies. Now, Lockheed Martin is scrambling to sell the same F-16s to old enemies in central Europe. The potential payoff - billions of dollars in fighter sales. Lockheed has signed cooperative agreements with industry in the region, opened offices to communicate with officials in government and business, and sent its chairman, Norman Augustine, on a tour of Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Romania and Slovenia to advance the company's name and image.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | McClatchy Newspapers
LONDON - President Obama was to visit Ireland today and the tiny village of Moneygall, home of his great-great-great grandfather on his mother's side. The president's quick stop in Ireland will begin a six-day trip across Europe that will include a state visit to the United Kingdom, talks about Libya and the Arab Spring with allies at a summit in France. It will also involve and an effort to smooth over relations with Poland and Central Europe after his administration canceled plans to build a missile-defense system there.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev yesterday balked at President Bush's latest proposal on troop reductions in Europe, telling Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d that the countries had to maintain the same number of troops throughout Europe. Still, important progress appeared to have been made on several other arms- control issues during Baker's visit to Moscow, and it was unclear whether the Soviet objections to the troop-cut plan were a major stumbling block or a negotating ploy.
NEWS
July 7, 1997
One of the most important American foreign policy decisions of our time will be made this week in Madrid, with very few Americans even aware of what is going on. President Clinton and leaders of our European allies will formally invite three countries from the former communist bloc in Eastern Europe - Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic - to join America's key military defense alliance, NATO. This decision to expand NATO eastward will have to be ratified by all 16 NATO members.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's proposal for a 35-nation summit meeting next year now has the qualified approval of the Bush administration - provided a treaty is completed to reduce troops and tanks in Europe. Secretary of State James A. Baker III told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee yesterday the summit could be the forum for signing the treaty and also provide a framework to deal with the question of German reunification. But he said the Soviets first must agree to the principle that free elections are a human right.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1990 | Daily News Staff Report
Cigna yesterday said one of its international property and casualty insurance subsidiaries, Brussels-based Cigna Insurance Co. of Europe, is among the first non-German insurance companies to be granted permission by East German authorities to open a representative office in that country. According to Cigna Europe Chairman H. Edward Hanway, the company expects to open an East Berlin office July 2. That is the same day the Inter-German Treaty, which links the economy of West and East Germany and removes barriers for companies to operate in East Germany, is expected to take effect.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2003 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Small and mid-size U.S. businesses may have a chance for a new export market: the Czech Republic, a Commerce Department official says. Although business opportunities there are good generally, they are especially abundant now because of last August's flooding, the worst to hit Central Europe in 500 years, said Richard Steffens, counselor in Prague for the U.S. Commercial Service. "The Czech Republic estimates that up to $5 billion in damage was done," and cleanup services at hazardous waste sites are particularly needed, Steffens said.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau Ellen Warren and Mark Thompson of the Inquirer Washington Bureau and the Washington Post contributed to this article
President Bush dispatched top aides to advise NATO allies and telephoned Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev before he proposed last night to further reduce Soviet and American combat troops in Europe, senior administration officials said. Although Bush raised the ante in conventional forces talks under way in Vienna, his suggested reduction fell short of targets urged recently by some NATO allies, arms control experts and former defense officials. But a senior administration official said Bush's new proposal represents "an attempt to catch up with the events that are moving very fast.
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NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Sergeant Price, 90, of Bryn Mawr, a cultural leader and World War II veteran, died Saturday, Feb. 22, of cancer at his home. For 60 years, Mr. Price was president and executive director of the America-Italy Society of Philadelphia, a cross-cultural institution. Blessed with a knack for managing investments, he made sure the society was well enough endowed to offer the Italian lessons, films, lectures, art exhibits, and study tours abroad for which it was known. The society subsidized the Amerita Chamber Players, a subset of the Philadelphia Orchestra.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CHARLES P. BRAXTON was there when the U.S. Army fought its way across Europe in World War II, culminating in the bitter Battle of the Bulge. But Charles Braxton wasn't allowed to do much fighting. He was African American, and the American military didn't think black men were able to fight. He performed service duties as the Army battled through Northern France, the Rhineland, central Europe, culminating in the Ardennes in Belgium in December 1944 when the German army made a last, desperate effort to win the war. But after his discharge, Charles Braxton was not finished with war. He returned to combat in the Korean War in the early '50s, when black soldiers were allowed to fight and die for their country, as they had been doing since the Revolution.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Pablo Gorondi, Associated Press
BUDAPEST, Hungary - The mighty Danube is not the only river in Europe bursting its banks this week, but it packs the biggest punch. Winding 1,777 miles across 10 nations, the Danube is the second-longest river on the continent, making its way from Germany's Black Forest to the Black Sea bordering Romania and Ukraine. Only the Volga in Russia is longer. In the last decade alone, the Danube has been at the center of two major floods, several devastating droughts, and a winter cold snap that froze the vital waterway for hundreds of miles.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
Europe facing flood threat BERLIN - Authorities in parts of central Europe issued disaster warnings and scrambled to reinforce flood defenses Sunday as rivers swelled by days of heavy rain threatened to burst their banks. Several people have died or are missing in the floods in Germany, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland since Thursday. Some residents also have been evacuated from flooding in southwestern Poland, as well as in Austria and Switzerland. Czech officials said waters of the Vltava River could reach critical levels in Prague and metal walls were being erected to prevent flooding.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Alina Wolfe Murray, Associated Press
BUCHAREST, Romania - Parts of Eastern and Central Europe were hit hard by heavy snow and frigid conditions for a second day Thursday, leaving hundreds trapped in cars, dozens of communities without power, and at least one person dead. Some areas had as much as 10 feet of snow. Some 340 people were evacuated overnight from stranded vehicles on roads across Romania, Prime Minister Emil Boc said, and 100 people more were transported during the day to Bucharest after getting stuck on two major roads.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | McClatchy Newspapers
LONDON - President Obama was to visit Ireland today and the tiny village of Moneygall, home of his great-great-great grandfather on his mother's side. The president's quick stop in Ireland will begin a six-day trip across Europe that will include a state visit to the United Kingdom, talks about Libya and the Arab Spring with allies at a summit in France. It will also involve and an effort to smooth over relations with Poland and Central Europe after his administration canceled plans to build a missile-defense system there.
NEWS
August 9, 2010 | Assiciated Press
WARSAW, Poland - The death toll in flooding in central Europe rose to 11 as Poland's interior minister said yesterday that two more people had died in the southwestern region of the country. The flooding has struck an area near the borders of Poland, Germany and the Czech Republic. Heavy rains in Poland caused flooding in the southwestern town of Bogatynia and one person was already reported dead on Saturday. In the northern Czech Republic, five people were found drowned over the weekend.
NEWS
October 18, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Morris "Moe" Shames, 89, of Northeast Philadelphia, a retired shoe-store-chain manager and theatrical booking agent, died Saturday at Abington Memorial Hospital of complications from a fall. For more than 60 years, Mr. Shames booked entertainers for events at synagogues and for local fund-raisers, and engaged talent for Atlantic City casinos and resorts in the Poconos and elsewhere. He was known from Connecticut to Florida, his son Stuart said. He worked with a whole generation of entertainers, including comics Jackie Mason and Henny Youngman, his son said, and more recently booked impressionist Marilyn Michaels and was negotiating to book comedienne Joy Behar, cohost of ABC's The View, for a local fund-raiser.
LIVING
March 3, 2006 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 and heralded the ultimate toppling of the whole Soviet system, the antiques of central Europe were mostly unavailable to the rest of the world. Pieces backed up in people's cellars, attics and barns for decades. It wasn't until after the end of the Cold War that a market for antiques began to evolve again here. But these days, with vintage pieces increasingly scarce and expensive in western Europe, former Soviet bloc countries are becoming a hot spot for dealers, designers, and lovers of goods that wear the patina of age. "I've seen dealers from France, Italy, the Netherlands, and particularly Belgium bringing trucks to some of the places we go," says dealer Tom Conrad, who last year launched Heart of Europe Tours (www.
NEWS
May 11, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the most expensive films ever made is about to open, and the gossip vultures already are circling. The movie is Troy, Wolfgang Petersen's sweeping adaptation of Homer's Iliad, starring Brad Pitt, Orlando Bloom and the gracefully aging Julie Christie. The flick, which opens Friday, is said to have cost more than $200 mil, so a lot of folks are naturally very nervous about whether Troy sinks like Waterworld or clean ups like Titanic. Their anxiety can't have been eased by hearing that Troy's German director is comparing the film's plot to the war in Iraq.
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