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NEWS
December 11, 1990 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warning that a dispute between Czechs and Slovaks had reached a crisis stage, President Vaclav Havel yesterday asked parliament for emergency powers to keep the country from breaking in two. "I've come to the conclusion that our young democracy and the very existence of our state are being threatened," said Havel, who came to power last year after a peaceful revolution against the communists. In a nationally televised speech, the playwright-turned-president painted an apocalyptic vision of what lies in store for the country if Slovakia is allowed to secede.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2013 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Iraq's northern Kurdish region is pressing the Obama administration to remain neutral in a dispute with the central government over whether it can export oil and gas without Baghdad's approval. The Kurdish Regional Government's energy minister, Ashti Hawrami, was meeting with administration officials Friday following recent talks with Turkey about completing pipelines, over Baghdad's objections, that could vastly expand the Kurds' ability to directly sell oil and gas. The U.S. opposition to the Kurds' energy deals has put it at odds with NATO ally Turkey amid concerns that the dispute over dividing Iraq's energy wealth could threaten that country's stability.
NEWS
May 2, 2006 | By Chris Mondics and Andy Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
While the idea of carving up Iraq into regions controlled by local ethnic and religious groups has been around for a while, there has always been the fear it would trigger a surge of sectarian violence leading to civil war. But in proposing just such a partition plan yesterday, Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D., Del.) stated bluntly that to a disturbing degree, Iraq was already there. Competing ethnic and religious groups are armed for battle, sectarian violence is raging, and ethnic cleansing is under way, he said.
NEWS
December 26, 1991
BILL'S WORLD From Bill Tammeus, Kansas City Star: What to call the Soviet Union? Try X.U.S.S.R. The Soviet Union is the only country in which the body of its founder, Lenin, is in better shape than it is. President Bush says the Founding Fathers never "envisioned that the central government would spend a quarter of the gross national product of this country. " Yes, but back then, the military-industrial complex was a blacksmith in Philadelphia. "The genius of the Bill of Rights is that it limits its attention to truly important things," Bush says.
NEWS
September 26, 1990
The bruising political battle now raging in the Soviet Union over how to dismantle socialism and move toward a free market isn't just about economics. It's about whether the Soviet Union should continue to exist. Radical economists, including Mikhail S. Gorbachev's two top economic advisers, believe that the central government is an obstacle to change: They want to hand over much of the reform process, including the power to tax and to sell state property, to the governments of the fifteen republics.
NEWS
December 22, 2004
COVER BOY Time magazine has made an appropriate selection in President George W. Bush for its closely followed "Person of the Year" designation. President Bush is a miracle man and a magician. He had everything going against him in his re-election bid, yet emerged victorious by a decisive margin. He brought us a catastrophic, expensive, deadly, elective war in Iraq that has no end in sight; he wrecked the economy, in record time turning massive surpluses into deficits; he betrayed his conservative base by demonstrating that he is a big-government liberal, further extending the long arm of the central government.
NEWS
August 4, 1991
The day before President Bush visited the Ukraine, six Lithuanian border guards were mysteriously machine-gunned to death at a customs post along the breakaway republic's border. The events are not unconnected. And they point up how hard it will be for President Bush to avoid choosing between support of Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev and the rights of the republics to seek an independence course. In Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, Mr. Bush said he would reject that "false choice.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Rami Al-Shaheibi, Associated Press
BENGHAZI, Libya - Tribal leaders and militia commanders declared oil-rich eastern Libya a semiautonomous state on Tuesday, a unilateral move that the interim head of state called a "dangerous" conspiracy by Arab nations to tear the country apart six months after the fall of Moammar Gadhafi. Thousands of representatives of major tribes, militia commanders and politicians made the declaration at a conference in the main eastern city of Benghazi, insisting it was not intended to divide the country.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delegates to the Federal Convention seemed as far as ever yesterday from agreement on the shape of a new government for the United States. Connecticut's William Samuel Johnson complained that they had not been able even to agree on what they were arguing about. Some delegates thought the states should be considered administrative departments of a central government, he said. Others thought the nation should be considered a confederation of sovereign states. Until those differences were settled, nothing else at the convention could be, Johnson warned.
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent Monique El-Faizy contributed to this article
It was a major political battle for America - how much power should the federal government have and how much should be left to the states. Denise Mitchell was describing the whole thing yesterday at Independence Hall. But the park ranger wasn't discussing the current battle between President Clinton and congressional Republicans. And she wasn't discussing the budget impasse that had once again shut the federal government. Mitchell was talking about the meeting held 208 years ago, in Philadelphia, to draft the U.S. Constitution.
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NEWS
July 27, 2014
ISSUE | GOVERNING What if Washington closed for business? Though both state and federal governments are the targets of the offensive that E.J. Dionne calls "conservatism's increasingly ferocious opposition to government," the preponderance of these rants are hurled against the federal government ("Populist and pro-business," July 22). So it's worth recalling the benefits of our central government, effects that obviously safeguard and enhance the lives of all. The federal government keeps the air, water, and food supply free of contamination.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2013 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Iraq's northern Kurdish region is pressing the Obama administration to remain neutral in a dispute with the central government over whether it can export oil and gas without Baghdad's approval. The Kurdish Regional Government's energy minister, Ashti Hawrami, was meeting with administration officials Friday following recent talks with Turkey about completing pipelines, over Baghdad's objections, that could vastly expand the Kurds' ability to directly sell oil and gas. The U.S. opposition to the Kurds' energy deals has put it at odds with NATO ally Turkey amid concerns that the dispute over dividing Iraq's energy wealth could threaten that country's stability.
NEWS
April 10, 2012
A trial in Libya for Gadhafi's son TRIPOLI, Libya - Moammar Gadhafi's son and former heir apparent, Seif al-Islam, will be put on trial inside Libya, and there will be a verdict before mid-June, a Libyan official said Monday. The decision comes despite appeals by rights groups to Libyan authorities to hand him over to the International Criminal Court in The Hague, due to fears that he may not get a fair trial in Libya. A trial in the capital Tripoli would, however, mark a small step forward for the central government, which has been struggling to unify the country under its authority since Moammar Gadhafi's capture and killing last year.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Rami Al-Shaheibi, Associated Press
BENGHAZI, Libya - Tribal leaders and militia commanders declared oil-rich eastern Libya a semiautonomous state on Tuesday, a unilateral move that the interim head of state called a "dangerous" conspiracy by Arab nations to tear the country apart six months after the fall of Moammar Gadhafi. Thousands of representatives of major tribes, militia commanders and politicians made the declaration at a conference in the main eastern city of Benghazi, insisting it was not intended to divide the country.
NEWS
May 2, 2006 | By Chris Mondics and Andy Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
While the idea of carving up Iraq into regions controlled by local ethnic and religious groups has been around for a while, there has always been the fear it would trigger a surge of sectarian violence leading to civil war. But in proposing just such a partition plan yesterday, Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D., Del.) stated bluntly that to a disturbing degree, Iraq was already there. Competing ethnic and religious groups are armed for battle, sectarian violence is raging, and ethnic cleansing is under way, he said.
NEWS
December 22, 2004
COVER BOY Time magazine has made an appropriate selection in President George W. Bush for its closely followed "Person of the Year" designation. President Bush is a miracle man and a magician. He had everything going against him in his re-election bid, yet emerged victorious by a decisive margin. He brought us a catastrophic, expensive, deadly, elective war in Iraq that has no end in sight; he wrecked the economy, in record time turning massive surpluses into deficits; he betrayed his conservative base by demonstrating that he is a big-government liberal, further extending the long arm of the central government.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2004 | By Shashank Bengali INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
With trade policy toward China emerging as a campaign issue, the Bush administration called on the Chinese government yesterday to quicken its reforms and level the playing field for U.S. companies. Commerce Secretary Donald Evans said China, the United States' third-largest trade partner, "must show more cooperation and less manipulation" in making the transition from a communist planned economy to a free-market system. Evans said the Chinese central government's ownership of key assets and "micromanagement" of the economy were thwarting transparency and putting U.S. firms and workers at a competitive disadvantage.
NEWS
January 23, 2000
The Supreme Court has given heartburn in recent years to folks dedicated to protecting individuals from discrimination and other mistreatment. Yet the very same rulings have gladdened others who believe the federal government has grown too big and powerful. This long-running struggle would confound the likes of Thomas Jefferson, whose chief fear was that too powerful a central government would imperil individual liberty. Yet in the 20th century, it clearly was the federal government that acted powerfully to ensure the basic rights of women, minorities and other victims of discrimination.
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent Monique El-Faizy contributed to this article
It was a major political battle for America - how much power should the federal government have and how much should be left to the states. Denise Mitchell was describing the whole thing yesterday at Independence Hall. But the park ranger wasn't discussing the current battle between President Clinton and congressional Republicans. And she wasn't discussing the budget impasse that had once again shut the federal government. Mitchell was talking about the meeting held 208 years ago, in Philadelphia, to draft the U.S. Constitution.
NEWS
November 14, 1994 | By GEORGE F. WILL
The election confirmed the axiom that people are inclined to believe in the truth of ideas that they see strongly believed. The election results are consequences of the wholesome contagion of conservative ideas. Times have changed indeed. "In the United States at this time," wrote Lionel Trilling in 1950, "liberalism is not only the dominant but even the sole intellectual tradition. For it is the plain fact that nowadays there are no conservative or reactionary ideas in general circulation.
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