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Central High School

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NEWS
May 21, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
DOZENS OF Central High School students and alums lined the entrance to their school and the front hallway inside, wearing their school colors proudly and wildly waving their arms. "277! 277!" they cheered last Thursday, high-fiving members of the incoming class as they entered the school. This was no pep rally in the traditional sense, but the annual Central High School freshman orientation for September's incoming class, known in these parts as 277. "It was really lively and felt like a homecoming," said Nathan Zeyl, 14, referring to the students' welcome.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AFTER BEING NAMED Pennsylvania's teacher of the year on Monday, Karen Beechey Kreider received applause from students yesterday on her return to class at Central High School. Kreider, who has been a teacher for 24 years, shared teacher-of-the-year honors with a fourth-grade teacher from Lebanon, Pa. Kreider teaches social studies and world history.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
Craig LaBan's review of Tiffin Bistro will appear Sept. 22 in the Arts & Entertainment section. An incorrect date was published in Thursday's Food section. A story Friday on cutbacks in Philadelphia school libraries incompletely named former Central High School librarian Loretta Burton.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, STAFF WRITER
Michael Moroz was prepared for backlash. But he wasn't expecting death threats. The 17-year-old, a senior at Central High School, recently wrote an opinion piece for the school's newspaper criticizing protests by student racial-justice activists at the University of Missouri. It ran alongside a piece that applauded the demonstrations. Moroz pulled no punches, calling Michael Brown, the black teenager killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., "a delinquent" who was "at worst, justifiably killed, and at best, a thug.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
A memorial service for U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak will be held at 3 p.m. Sept. 28 in the ceremonial courtroom of the U.S. Courthouse, 6th and Market streets. Judge Pollak died May 8 at the age of 89. Contributions in his memory may be made to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (www.naacpldg.org) or the Sarah Dekker Memorial Art Award, checks payable to Associated Alumni of Central High School, c/o Katherine Morse, P.O. Box 30592, Philadelphia PA 19103.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THROUGH the years, people have told James Stewart that someday someone was going to come along and help him. He thought about those words as he learned to ride a bike. He thought about them as he bonded with his father over cooking lessons. He thought about them as he toured pizzerias to learn how to toss pizzas. He thought about them as he lived his life with a malformed hand, a birth defect. The reality is that Stewart, 34, doesn't need help: He's adapted, he's determined and he's doing just fine in his job making pizzas.
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city's oldest public school has a new leader. Timothy McKenna, who earned a reputation for reducing violence and improving performance at Furness High in South Philadelphia, will become president of Central High School at the end of this school year. McKenna will succeed Sheldon S. Pavel, who has led Central for 28 years and whose name had come to be almost synonymous with the school. It was previously reported that Pavel planned to retire in July. In a letter on Central's website, Shai Gluskin, vice president for communications for the school's Home and School Association, said McKenna had won out over 12 other candidates in part because faculty members on the selection committee said they were eager to work for him.   Contact Miriam Hill at hillmb@phillynews.com or 215-854-5520.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A caller awaited Central High School's principal when he arrived at school Wednesday: Mayor Nutter. The city's chief executive, it turns out, had read an Inquirer story detailing the plight of Central's RoboLancers, the student-led robotics program. The team recently won the organization's top honor and a pass to its world championship in St. Louis next week - but needed $35,000 to get there. "He told me it was important for us to be at Worlds," principal Timothy McKenna said. "He said he was going to make calls on our behalf.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another institution has revoked an honor previously bestowed on Bill Cosby. Central High School's alumni association voted this week to remove the entertainer - who has been accused by dozens of women of sexual assault - from its Hall of Fame. Cosby briefly attended Central in the 1950s, spending only a portion of ninth grade there. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998. After months of consideration, the alumni association board voted, 22-6, Thursday night to strip Cosby of the honor, said Jeffrey A. Muldawer, board president.
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SPORTS
May 22, 2016 | By Rick O'Brien, STAFF WRITER
Margharita Amihava moved with her family from Belarus to the United States when she was 4. "My parents were looking for a better life and more opportunities," she said. Amihava, now 18 and a student at Central High School, recently realized one of her parents' dreams when she earned a scholarship to study biology and row at Drexel. Philadelphia City Rowing, established six years ago, has played a huge role in Amihava's development in the sport. It gives students from city public and charter schools that do not have rowing programs the chance to compete on the water.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
After graduating from Central High School in Philadelphia, William T. Moore enlisted in the Navy. For two years, he studied at a naval training center on the Navy Pier in Chicago, son Thomas said, while learning to become a carrier-based aircraft machinist. But then he was diagnosed with rheumatic fever, which a Mayo Clinic website states "can cause permanent damage to the heart. " A Navy physician "went to him and his mother, Edith," who had gone to be with her son, "told them he was doomed," and gave him an early discharge "to go home to perish.
SPORTS
February 4, 2016 | By Tom Reifsnyder, Staff Writer
With the Public League crown on the line, all eyes were fixated on Isaac Morales as he took the mat on Tuesday for the final match of the night in front of a packed house at Central High School. Northeast led by four points, so Central needed at least a major decision to even force a tie. But Northeast's senior captain, admittedly, wasn't feeling so stone cold. He could feel the pressure mounting on him. "I was nervous," Morales said. "I had never been in a situation like that before, but I kept my composure and pulled through.
NEWS
January 12, 2016
ISSUE | PRESS FREEDOM Poor perspective As celebrated as Central High School is, senior Michael Moroz somehow missed the lesson about a person being presumed innocent until proven guilty ("Getting lesson in intolerance," Wednesday). Michael Brown, the Ferguson, Mo., teenager who was shot and killed by police, had never been found guilty of anything. Being a "delinquent" or a "thug," which is what Moroz called Brown in a commentary in the school newspaper, is not a reason to be murdered by police or anyone else.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Julia Terruso and Chris Hepp, STAFF WRITERS
Jim Kenney's first full day as mayor took him from a schoolhouse abuzz with Philadelphia's future to a hall that exhibits its storied past. He also went to his office, grabbed a Diet Coke and a sandwich from Subway, and started setting a tone as brisk and sunny as the bitter-cold morning. "Let's do it," Kenney said, holding a Bible to help swear in his new police commissioner, Richard Ross, at Ross' alma mater, Central High School. Kenney, with director of communications Lauren Hitt in tow, arrived early for the 10:30 a.m. event so he could meet privately with Ross and then with the school's president, Timothy J. McKenna.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Two months ago, Philadelphia's new mayor asked Philadelphia's new police commissioner where he would like to take the oath of office. "I'm not that conventional," Jim Kenney told Richard Ross. They could skip a staid ceremony at City Hall, he said. Instead, Kenney asked, "Is there a place that's important to you?" And so, on Tuesday afternoon, dozens of police officers and politicians and preachers piled into the seats in Central High School's auditorium. The school's entire graduating class filled in the seats behind them and gave a son of Central a standing ovation when he was sworn in as the city's 30th police commissioner.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, STAFF WRITER
Michael Moroz was prepared for backlash. But he wasn't expecting death threats. The 17-year-old, a senior at Central High School, recently wrote an opinion piece for the school's newspaper criticizing protests by student racial-justice activists at the University of Missouri. It ran alongside a piece that applauded the demonstrations. Moroz pulled no punches, calling Michael Brown, the black teenager killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., "a delinquent" who was "at worst, justifiably killed, and at best, a thug.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When he was growing up near 17th and Diamond Streets in North Philadelphia in the 1920s and 1930s, Conrad M. Brahin lived in the apartment above a pharmacy and soda counter owned by his parents. The pharmacy was run by his father, Samuel, an immigrant from Kiev, in what is now Ukraine, who had graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. "He ran deliveries for my grandfather [and] encountered some situations where people were trying to rob him," Conrad Brahin's son, Jason, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ebony Power list honors Central High School student Bobby Hill was selected as one of Ebony magazine's 2015 Power 100 honorees. The list spotlights "the heroes of the black community. " The 14-year-old breakout star, a soloist with the Keystone State Boychoir, rose to prominence during Pope Francis ' Philadelphia visit when he sang an a cappella version of "Pie Jesu. " Hill's once-in-a-lifetime performance was a last-minute decision, said Steve Fisher , founder and artistic director of the choir.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another institution has revoked an honor previously bestowed on Bill Cosby. Central High School's alumni association voted this week to remove the entertainer - who has been accused by dozens of women of sexual assault - from its Hall of Fame. Cosby briefly attended Central in the 1950s, spending only a portion of ninth grade there. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998. After months of consideration, the alumni association board voted, 22-6, Thursday night to strip Cosby of the honor, said Jeffrey A. Muldawer, board president.
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