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NEWS
February 7, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On any given school day, more than 600 of Chester High School's 1,700 students are absent. Two hundred more students are probably in the school building, but not in class. Those staggering statistics do not even include the estimated 500 students who have dropped out of the high school since the start of this school year, according to Janice Hoffman-Willis of the Chester Upland School District. "The absentee problem is a sore that has been allowed to fester for years, and we have to act now to do something before we lose the hand," she said.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Schools Superintendent David Hornbeck testified yesterday before Commonwealth Court Judge Doris Smith that the district is revamping its structure by axing its regional offices. He said he agreed with a court-appointed education team's recommendation to get rid of the regional offices to decentralize the system. The regional offices act as go-betweens for schools and the central office. Hornbeck was a witness during the second day of hearings on Smith's education team's report on improving city schools.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a surprise move, Neshaminy Assistant Superintendent Bernard Hoffman announced his retirement at a school board meeting. Hoffman, 56, said he wanted to leave at the end of the school year in 1997. He has worked in the school district for 38 years, starting as a 20-year-old teacher in 1958 at Penndel Elementary School. Hoffman has been a constant in the ever-growing Neshaminy School District. Board member Robert S. Tull Jr. said he remembered as a boy admiring Hoffman.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Malik Muhammad remembers the day a gunman shot and killed a man on Lancaster Avenue near 42nd Street last month. And how that same night, the owner of a deli was shot in the chest in an exchange of gunfire during a $20 robbery. And a week before, the 1:30 a.m. police call to Muhammad's own house telling him that his civic association, in the same block, had been firebombed. Muhammad, the executive director of Showcase Community Services and the president of Lancaster Avenue Business Association, is thankful officers spotted the fire before it destroyed the office.
NEWS
June 26, 2002 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing her disagreement with the "magnitude" and rapid pace of the plan to change Philadelphia schools, the district's acting superintendent - a lifelong city resident and graduate of its schools - announced her resignation yesterday. Deidre Farmbry, acting superintendent and chief academic officer, whose career in Philadelphia spans 28 years, will leave July 31. Her departure comes amid a swirl of change in the school district, including this week's expected announcement of the elimination of 300 jobs in the district's central office.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
It appeared that the curtain had dropped for city regional music festivals that showcased the musical skills of 12,000 to 15,000 public school student musicians each year. But now comes word from School District officials that the concerts will go on. Six of seven regional School District offices have agreed to host the festivals using an already-stretched music staff to organize the events once run by administrators whose positions were eliminated this year. The holdout, the Central East region, isn't planning a festival.
NEWS
March 9, 1987 | By Edward J. Gallagher
The New Jersey Education Association (NJEA) supports the state's responsibility to intervene in deficient school districts but opposes the so- called school-takeover legislation as it is currently proposed. More accurately, Assembly Bill 2927 establishes the governance of a school district after intervention. Some of the state's ideas about how districts should be operated create the problems. It should be stressed that NJEA believes the state has an obligation to do everything in its power to ensure the best quality education for all New Jersey students.
NEWS
August 21, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With dozens of heavy hitters in the arts community looking on, Philadelphia schools chief Arlene Ackerman said yesterday that she would solidify the leadership in art and music education by the end of the month. A central office overhaul stripped the longtime heads of those departments of their jobs, causing supporters to balk and a private contributor to threaten to pull its funding. But at a School Reform Commission meeting yesterday, Ackerman and commission members reiterated their support for arts education and said the upheaval was necessary to ensure equity among all students.
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Some think the School District's stately headquarters at 21st Street and the Parkway is an opulent palace for overpaid bureaucrats, but the view from the basement is anything but chic. Just ask City Controller Jonathan Saidel, who was surveying the damage yesterday from a burst heating pipe that spewed 200-degree water over desks covered with auditors' work papers. The accident occurred late Thursday. It was discovered by a district employee after the heating system went down and an alarm sounded.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
The city is planning to decentralize its fight against street-level drug dealers by assigning about 100 narcotics investigators to neighborhood duty in the Police Department's nine regional divisions. Currently, all anti-drug efforts are centrally administered through the Narcotics Unit, the Narcotics Strike Force and uniformed narcotics officers. This central force, with some 200 officers, will be maintained at present levels, said police spokesman Capt. Richard DeLise. It will continue to be responsible for citywide investigations aimed at major suppliers, he said.
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