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Centuries

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NEWS
December 28, 1999 | By Hannah Sassaman
He laughed, and peeled the sides of his Pop-Tart into brown seams. Currency filled the room: toilet paper, orange juice. Plastic crates filled with next week's copies of magazines. In the morning we boarded the windows, smeared the doorposts, anticipated scourge. He still wondered if I could be trusted, eyed my calves for contractions. For moments, throughout the night, I wanted to run away, to place my lips on the Liberty Bell with the rest of the throng, accept the year, the swallow of cold breath, but, even so: we anointed our heads in our nightclothes, the pillow, the approach of the morning.
NEWS
September 21, 1986 | Inquirer Photographs by Akira Suwa
The Shanghai Acrobatic Troupe, 10 members strong from the People's Republic of China, has brought its balancing, juggling and contortionist acts to Great Adventure in Jackson, N.J. Many of the acts, which have been refined over centuries, date back 2,000 years to the Han Dynasty. The troupe performed last weekend and will perform this weekend and next.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tamara Crout's recital Sunday covered an astounding range of music plucked from more than four centuries of voice literature. The varied repertoire showed the soprano's considerable stylistic savvy. More impressively, though, it spoke to her taste. Each piece was a little gem, from obscurities such as "Ard'il mio petto" from Le Nuove Musiche by Giulio Caccini, to Barber's beloved Knoxville: Summer of 1915. The music in Purcell's "Sweeter Than Roses," though written in the 17th century, is every bit as descriptive of its text as anything written in the 20th century.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | By Peggy Reeves Sanday
Why do Americans love to sacrifice women on the altar of ancient stereotypes by portraying them as "scorned women" and "congenital liars"? You'd think we could have gotten a little more inventive about women in the past 300 years. By slinging mud at Hillary Rodham Clinton, William Safire became only the latest to engage in this sort of negative name calling. A few years ago, Anita Hill was accused of lying, either because she was "vindictive," had a "martyr-type complex," was a "spurned or scorned woman," or was "out of touch with reality.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lisa Tremper Barnes gazes at the small, sand-colored object in the display case, and has visions of flames shooting skyward and men being put to the sword and women dragged off by the fierce invaders. You can read about it in the Old Testament Book of Jeremiah - the terrible events of the year 586 B.C., when . . . In the ninth year of Zedekiah king of Judah, in the tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and all his army came against Jerusalem, and besieged it. Here, in an exhibition at the Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College in Collegeville, you can see the physical evidence of those frightful days, and the centuries before and after.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ask Scott Kollins about his fascination with gnomes, and he starts with a disclaimer: "I'm not over the deep end - yet. " But in the dozen or so years he's been collecting statues of these jaunty "little people," Kollins concedes he's occasionally drifted toward that "deep end," a place already inhabited by untold numbers of people around the world. "Gnomes are goofy. They're wacky. I think they're funny," says Kollins, a sales manager for a consulting company, who has 15 gnomes stationed throughout his tiny rowhouse garden in Fairmount.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | By William Ecenbarger, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even a skeptic like Mark Twain was enraptured upon seeing Istanbul from the sea - "a noble picture," he called it in Innocents Abroad, "by far the hand-som-est city we have seen. " Now, 128 years later, from the deck of the Radisson Diamond, the city on two continents still foists itself on the eye; it looks much the same - bulbous mosque domes, slender minarets, and the towers of Topkapi Palace silhouetted against a sky of fleecy white clouds, flushed pink with the dying day. From a distance, the only visible concessions to modernity are the yellow rivers of taxis on the streets and, on the roofs, satellite dishes eavesdropping on the world.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | By Mike Shoup, INQUIRER TRAVEL EDITOR
Strolling along tiny, tree-lined Canal Street in Lubeck's Old Town one balmy spring evening near dusk, I came upon a simple plaster-over-brick home with the year 1776 etched into the door lintel. "I see that house was built in 1776," I said to an older couple sitting in folding chairs outside their own place just a few doors down, enjoying the unseasonably mild weather. "That's about the time America got started - the year of the revolution, anyway. And I bet your home is even older.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I didn't come to Bordeaux looking for Eleanor of Aquitaine. My youthful infatuation with this best-known of medieval queens had been gathering dust in my mental attic, so it was my past as well as hers that came back to haunt me when I found myself walking in her traces on a long weekend in this ancient city. Suddenly there she was, in spirit at least, entering the city through gates in walls whose shadows still linger, wending her way through streets that retain their tangled medieval courses if not their 12th-century houses, and stopping before the Cathedral of St. Andre to arrange her skirts, headdress, and entourage before entering the church to be married - not once but twice, the second time a match with the future Henry II of England that would change the destinies of England and Aquitaine, Eleanor's possession in southwestern France.
NEWS
April 15, 1986
In his April 1 Op-ed Page column, Sydney J. Harris referred to a comment made by "Milton, echoing Tacitus nearly two centuries earlier. " If Mr. Harris means that Milton wrote nearly two centuries before the April 1 column, he is at least 100 years off, the poet John Milton having died in 1674. If, conversely, Mr. Harris was trying to say that Tacitus wrote nearly two centuries earlier than Milton, he is even further off the mark as the Roman historian Cornelius Tacitus died circa A.D. 117. Harris M. Abrams Plainsboro, N.J.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
August 15, 2016 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 2003, George Funkhouser and Susan Nitka drove to Bridgeton, N.J., where George, who buys and sells precious metals and antiques, was going to meet with a client. At the time, the couple were living in Philadelphia's Port Richmond section in a home she had inherited from her parents. They had been together for a decade and were considering buying a larger house. That day in Bridgeton, they drove down streets lined with mansions built in the 19th century, when the city was a center for industry in South Jersey.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
On Monday, construction workers digging at the site of the former Suit Corner store on the southwest corner of Third and Market Streets uncovered something other than a blazer and trousers. Specifically, construction worker Ery Chacon said Tuesday, they found two brick arches about 10 feet below street level - and experts say they could be from before the nation was founded. As it happens, people who were collared ended up at that location long before it became the Suit Corner, which was destroyed by fire in 2014.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
On Thursday, hundreds of tots (and other youngsters up to age 10) will promenade down the Ocean City Boardwalk in the family resort's 107th annual baby parade. Some will walk. Others will ride in style in fanciful strollers, go-carts, and wagons. All will delight onlookers. The tradition dates back to 1909, when photoengraver Leo Bamberger - who helped organize Labor Day - founded the event. According to Michael J. Hartman, Ocean City's special events coordinator and artistic director of the Greater Ocean City Theatre Company, in the golden age of the parade, attendees treated the festivities like a night on the town, dressing up in glamorous attire.
FOOD
July 8, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
In 2008, news of a global hops shortage sent brewers into a cold panic. But for a few would-be farmers, it planted the seed - or, more precisely, the rhizome - of an idea. Though it had been nearly a century since this region's hops industry was decimated by a disease called downy mildew, then eradicated by Prohibition, perhaps, they thought, it was time for a comeback. Today, that resurgence is taking root in places like Oast House Hop Farm in Wrightstown, N.J., where about an acre of a former horse farm has been impaled with 20-foot poles, suspending vines bearing the flowers that give beer its bitter, floral, herbal, or fruity notes.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Twenty-five years after she alleged sexual harassment by a U.S. Supreme Court nominee, Anita Hill will headline the Pennsylvania Conference for Women on Oct. 6 at the Convention Center. And, yes, Hill plans to talk about how to address harassment in the working world today, for a generation of millennial women who either weren't born or didn't know Hill's name in 1991, the year she appeared before an all-male congressional inquiry. A renowned attorney, author, and law professor, Hill gave testimony during Clarence Thomas' Senate confirmation hearing that ignited a national debate on workplace sexual harassment.
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
Octavius V. Catto, one of Philadelphia's greatest of Renaissance men, an activist, educator, writer, athlete, and speaker gunned down in election violence in 1871, will at last be fully honored by the city where he lived and died for his beliefs and for the color of his skin. The design for a public memorial to Catto, which will grace City Hall's southern apron, will be presented to the public at a Mayor's Reception Room gathering at 11 a.m. Friday, and the artist, Branly Cadet, will be introduced to talk about his work.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TV Critic
The first job of any remake is to justify itself. Why do we need a new version of Roots , the beloved 1977 ABC mini-series whose finale more than 100 million people watched and whose most recent rerun - in high-definition on TV One - was only last fall? Because the world has changed enough in 39 years to justify more sophisticated writing and better production values, but not enough to make Roots any less relevant. Our understanding of the history underlying Roots has changed, too, though not in ways that hurt the History Channel's four-night version, which premieres at 9 p.m. Memorial Day and will be simulcast on A&E and Lifetime.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
Yuja, live from New York. Pianist Yuja Wang has worked up a solo recital she's playing in the United States, Paris, and Germany, and at the Concertgebouw, but listeners all over can hear the program when she brings it to Carnegie Hall at 8 p.m. Saturday. Repertoire includes Brahms' Ballades, Op. 10, Nos. 1 and 2; Schumann's Kreisleriana, Op. 16; and the Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 29 in B-flat Major, Op. 106, "Hammerklavier. " The Curtis Institute of Music graduate is something of a visual phenomenon for many, and for those fans, the Carnegie Hall recital will be streamed live online, and available for viewing on free replay for 90 days, at medici.tv.
NEWS
April 15, 2016
There is a consensus that aggression by one nation against another is a serious matter, but there is no comparable consensus about what constitutes aggression. Waging aggressive war was one charge against Nazi leaders at the 1946 Nuremberg war crimes trials, but 70 years later, it is unclear that aggression, properly understood, must involve war, as commonly understood. Or that war, in today's context of novel destructive capabilities, must involve "the use of armed force," which the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court says is constitutive of an "act of aggression.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
When Henry Mayer, chief archivist at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, first called the FBI about Alfred Rosenberg's missing diary, Robert K. Wittman, head of the art-crime team in Philadelphia, had only the broadest sense of whom Mayer was talking about. "I'd heard of [Rosenberg], and I had an idea that he was a high-ranking Nazi," Wittman recalled the other day. Mayer wanted the diary - badly. "I knew it had a lot of information," Wittman said. "Nowhere is it written down, anywhere, that Hitler ordered the killing of the Jews.
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