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Centuries

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NEWS
December 28, 1999 | By Hannah Sassaman
He laughed, and peeled the sides of his Pop-Tart into brown seams. Currency filled the room: toilet paper, orange juice. Plastic crates filled with next week's copies of magazines. In the morning we boarded the windows, smeared the doorposts, anticipated scourge. He still wondered if I could be trusted, eyed my calves for contractions. For moments, throughout the night, I wanted to run away, to place my lips on the Liberty Bell with the rest of the throng, accept the year, the swallow of cold breath, but, even so: we anointed our heads in our nightclothes, the pillow, the approach of the morning.
NEWS
September 21, 1986 | Inquirer Photographs by Akira Suwa
The Shanghai Acrobatic Troupe, 10 members strong from the People's Republic of China, has brought its balancing, juggling and contortionist acts to Great Adventure in Jackson, N.J. Many of the acts, which have been refined over centuries, date back 2,000 years to the Han Dynasty. The troupe performed last weekend and will perform this weekend and next.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tamara Crout's recital Sunday covered an astounding range of music plucked from more than four centuries of voice literature. The varied repertoire showed the soprano's considerable stylistic savvy. More impressively, though, it spoke to her taste. Each piece was a little gem, from obscurities such as "Ard'il mio petto" from Le Nuove Musiche by Giulio Caccini, to Barber's beloved Knoxville: Summer of 1915. The music in Purcell's "Sweeter Than Roses," though written in the 17th century, is every bit as descriptive of its text as anything written in the 20th century.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | By Peggy Reeves Sanday
Why do Americans love to sacrifice women on the altar of ancient stereotypes by portraying them as "scorned women" and "congenital liars"? You'd think we could have gotten a little more inventive about women in the past 300 years. By slinging mud at Hillary Rodham Clinton, William Safire became only the latest to engage in this sort of negative name calling. A few years ago, Anita Hill was accused of lying, either because she was "vindictive," had a "martyr-type complex," was a "spurned or scorned woman," or was "out of touch with reality.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ask Scott Kollins about his fascination with gnomes, and he starts with a disclaimer: "I'm not over the deep end - yet. " But in the dozen or so years he's been collecting statues of these jaunty "little people," Kollins concedes he's occasionally drifted toward that "deep end," a place already inhabited by untold numbers of people around the world. "Gnomes are goofy. They're wacky. I think they're funny," says Kollins, a sales manager for a consulting company, who has 15 gnomes stationed throughout his tiny rowhouse garden in Fairmount.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lisa Tremper Barnes gazes at the small, sand-colored object in the display case, and has visions of flames shooting skyward and men being put to the sword and women dragged off by the fierce invaders. You can read about it in the Old Testament Book of Jeremiah - the terrible events of the year 586 B.C., when . . . In the ninth year of Zedekiah king of Judah, in the tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and all his army came against Jerusalem, and besieged it. Here, in an exhibition at the Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College in Collegeville, you can see the physical evidence of those frightful days, and the centuries before and after.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | By William Ecenbarger, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even a skeptic like Mark Twain was enraptured upon seeing Istanbul from the sea - "a noble picture," he called it in Innocents Abroad, "by far the hand-som-est city we have seen. " Now, 128 years later, from the deck of the Radisson Diamond, the city on two continents still foists itself on the eye; it looks much the same - bulbous mosque domes, slender minarets, and the towers of Topkapi Palace silhouetted against a sky of fleecy white clouds, flushed pink with the dying day. From a distance, the only visible concessions to modernity are the yellow rivers of taxis on the streets and, on the roofs, satellite dishes eavesdropping on the world.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | By Mike Shoup, INQUIRER TRAVEL EDITOR
Strolling along tiny, tree-lined Canal Street in Lubeck's Old Town one balmy spring evening near dusk, I came upon a simple plaster-over-brick home with the year 1776 etched into the door lintel. "I see that house was built in 1776," I said to an older couple sitting in folding chairs outside their own place just a few doors down, enjoying the unseasonably mild weather. "That's about the time America got started - the year of the revolution, anyway. And I bet your home is even older.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I didn't come to Bordeaux looking for Eleanor of Aquitaine. My youthful infatuation with this best-known of medieval queens had been gathering dust in my mental attic, so it was my past as well as hers that came back to haunt me when I found myself walking in her traces on a long weekend in this ancient city. Suddenly there she was, in spirit at least, entering the city through gates in walls whose shadows still linger, wending her way through streets that retain their tangled medieval courses if not their 12th-century houses, and stopping before the Cathedral of St. Andre to arrange her skirts, headdress, and entourage before entering the church to be married - not once but twice, the second time a match with the future Henry II of England that would change the destinies of England and Aquitaine, Eleanor's possession in southwestern France.
NEWS
April 15, 1986
In his April 1 Op-ed Page column, Sydney J. Harris referred to a comment made by "Milton, echoing Tacitus nearly two centuries earlier. " If Mr. Harris means that Milton wrote nearly two centuries before the April 1 column, he is at least 100 years off, the poet John Milton having died in 1674. If, conversely, Mr. Harris was trying to say that Tacitus wrote nearly two centuries earlier than Milton, he is even further off the mark as the Roman historian Cornelius Tacitus died circa A.D. 117. Harris M. Abrams Plainsboro, N.J.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was known variously as Alice, Alice of Dunk's Ferry, Black Alice, or Old Alice. She was a slave who lived at least 108 years - some say 116 - and saw three centuries. She never learned how to read or write, and never gained her freedom, but her head was filled with priceless memories. Alice could tell a story like no one else - whether it was about meeting William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania; witnessing the early days of Philadelphia; or navigating boats between Dunk's Ferry - now Beverly - and what is now Bensalem.
SPORTS
June 1, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Throughout Philadelphia's sports history, soccer has popped up sporadically, an invading virus that the city's natural indifference to the game typically manages to resist. Sometimes, as now with the Union, the outbreak is more severe. But mostly, like the rest of America, we've been immune to the sport that so infects the world. So it was jarring last week when news of a soccer-related scandal was stripped across The Inquirer's front page, even if this story's appeal was amorality and not athletics.
SPORTS
May 8, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Columnist
P.T. BARNUM never uttered the phrase, "There's a sucker born every minute. " Biographers pin it on a critic or a con man of his era, which sure seems to make more sense. To say such a thing would have been bad business, especially if, as the story goes, the famous promoter was trying to convince the public his fake petrified giant was the real thing and not a plaster-built copy of another fake petrified giant. Barnum eventually fessed up to avoid a lawsuit brought from the guy who owned the other fake.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most important figures in the civil-rights movement was stopped from speaking at the historic March on Washington and has spent the last half-century in virtual obscurity. But a month before that 1963 march, it was Gloria Richardson, a full-time mother who kept guns in her house, seated next to U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy during the signing of the historic "Treaty of Cambridge. " As the leader of a group that became a national model for the likes of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the burgeoning black power movement, she was instrumental in brokering that agreement, which lay the groundwork for desegregation in an Eastern Shore town in Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* THE BOOK OF NEGROES. 8 tonight, tomorrow and Wednesday, BET.   MINISERIES are back in vogue, commissioned by networks looking for event programming and headlined by big names who wouldn't think of committing to multiple seasons. Good as an "Olive Kitteridge" or a "Fargo" might be, they can feel, well, mini next to the blockbusters of the '70s and '80s - shows like "Roots," "The Winds of War" and "The Thorn Birds. " At six hours over three nights, BET's Canadian-produced "The Book of Negroes," which premieres tonight, is half the length of "Roots," but it's epic in scope, with a cast that includes Oscar winners Cuba Gooding Jr. and Louis Gossett Jr. (who, 38 years ago, co-starred in "Roots")
SPORTS
February 4, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
PHOENIX - Tom Brady always believed the Patriots would win Super Bowl XLIX, he said yesterday morning, in a croaking, scratchy voice that no doubt reflected a very long night of celebration. "Then they made that catch, and I had a little bit of doubt," Brady said at the morning-after news conference for the winning coach and Super Bowl MVP. "And then we made a great play. " Surely, as others have suggested, Brady will donate the MVP's Chevy pickup to Malcolm Butler, the undrafted rookie cornerback from West Alabama who stepped in front of Seattle wideout Ricardo Lockette on Butler's 18th defensive snap of the evening.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most kids in the region, Tuesday's "snow day" was a perfect storm: A forecast bad enough to cancel classes, yet a dusting so mild that they could spend their unexpected holiday at the mall or the multiplex. But at Bryn Mawr's Baldwin School, it was an ideal day to stay inside the house and read the Chinese philosopher Confucius or sit at the computer coding new apps. In fact, they had no choice. That's because the Main Line girls' academy has replaced "snow days" with "cyber days" - alternative online learning on days when the local roads are deemed impassable but the Information Superhighway is wide open.
NEWS
January 6, 2015
MY DAD, who was buried yesterday, died happy, but not satisfied. Happy for the gifts of family, good health, longevity and love, but not satisfied, because America had not achieved all she could. He believed that America's people deserve health care - the last crusade of his life - as they deserve, say, free education through college. Sydney Bernard Bykofsky, who spent 98 years among us, believed that every American deserves a job that pays at least a living wage, and that a rich America had no excuse to allow a child to go to bed hungry - anywhere .   Since moving to Florida about 20 years ago, and acquiring a wardrobe as colorful as the Seychelles flag, Dad's single extravagance was leasing a new car every three years.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Triumph of David was a mess. Old, original paint on the 17th-century canvas was faded and flaking in many spots. Newer paint from several inexpert restoration attempts had become discolored. Standing before the massive painting at Villanova University, art conservator Kristin deGhetaldi could tell all this with her experienced eye. But in order to bring the painting back to life, how could she tell where the old paint ended and the new paint began? The answer: a mix of art and science.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRICK TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The remains of a shipwreck buried beneath 20 feet of sand recently unearthed by crews rebuilding a seawall in the Normandy Beach section of this Ocean County municipality may be a historically significant treasure. State archeologists will seek to determine whether a pile of timbers and a wooden, barrel-shaped windlass uncovered as workers tried to pound a steel beam into the sand - breaking the pile-driving equipment twice - are pieces of the 19th-century ship Ayreshire.
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