CollectionsCerebral Palsy
IN THE NEWS

Cerebral Palsy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | By Sharon Tubbs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1986, Kirk Vosbikian, a third grader at Parkway Elementary School, died of a rare form of cancer. Nine years later, his ordeal is inspiring a spirit of giving among the school's students and teachers, as evidenced by a display of affection for another ailing Parkway student. The teachers and students call their fund-raising campaign the Circle of Giving. So far, the students have donated $475.03 in pennies to Ronald McDonald House in Philadelphia. Plus, they sold about $500 worth of hoagies on Election Day for charities that benefit cerebral palsy.
NEWS
February 10, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A major report on the causes of cerebral palsy is renewing debate over how often, and how much, a physician is to blame when a baby is born with the disorder. The 95-page document, issued by two leading physicians groups, concludes that cerebral palsy is rarely caused by lack of oxygen, or asphyxia, during labor and delivery. It also sets out nine criteria for judging whether a child's disability is due to asphyxia, and whether it occurred during birth. Trial lawyers have denounced the report as self-serving and dangerous.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The climb up the 72 steps that lead to the entrance of the Philadelphia Museum of Art began at 10 a.m. Saturday for the woman known as the Left-Thumb Blogger. Glenda Watson Hyatt, a 44-year-old writer with cerebral palsy whose autobiography is called I'll Do It Myself , didn't quite do it alone. The Rocky devotees wouldn't let her. Hyatt was surrounded by a Rocky impersonator, a newspaper executive who wrote a book about Rocky, and a band playing the Rocky theme.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | By Marguerite P. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
Steven Roach always loved karate: He read about it, watched martial-arts movies and dreamed about studying it. But because he has cerebral palsy, Roach, 17, and almost everyone else thought he could never actually practice karate. Now, after four months of lessons, the Doylestown Township student has earned his second karate belt and says the martial art has done more for him than almost an entire lifetime of physical therapy for cerebral palsy, which damages the central nervous system.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | BY LARRY MCMULLEN
Butch Dow has what some people would call an attitude. Here's how his works: "I have a mild case of cerebral palsy," he was telling me last night. We were sitting at the kitchen table in his rowhouse in South Philadelphia. His aluminum crutches were propped against a cabinet. "How long could you stand on your legs without the crutches?" I asked. "About five seconds," he said. Then he told me how long it took from the time he was born until he first walked as a kid. "Thirteen years," he said.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
To be or not to be. Shakespeare chose simple words for the most complicated of questions, words so powerful that they have resonated for four centuries. When Heather Krause, a teaching artist with Walnut Street Theatre, saw how her students responded to those words, she had an outrageous idea: stage Hamlet with six high school-age actors with mental retardation and cerebral palsy, children so disabled that all are in wheelchairs and some cannot speak without the aid of machines.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New evidence suggests that cerebral palsy, a disabling disorder in newborns that causes a lifetime of problems, can be triggered by infections and blood clots in the fetus. Researchers found telltale signs of such infections and blood clots by tracking down certain chemicals in the blood of babies who were later diagnosed with cerebral palsy. The insight will not immediately lead to treatment, diagnosis or prevention, but provides important clues into the secrets of a maddeningly mysterious disease.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On her first day of kindergarten, Kelly Matula's anxieties were higher than those of most of her classmates. Along with the pressures of meeting new friends and learning to stand with others in a straight line, she had just been fitted with knee-high leg braces. Matula, who has cerebral palsy, already had an awkward gait. The braces made it even more so. Teachers and students watched fearfully as she teetered at the top of the slide before safely making her way down. On the second day of school, she tripped over a curb on her way in from recess and fell.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
After Jason's foster mother dresses him in the morning, he swings into action for the day. He sits down on the living room floor, takes off both shoes and one sock and twirls the sock around in the air. Then he pads out to the kitchen to eat anything that's set before him, as his appetite is zesty. Jason, 1 1/2, is in good health and has an average IQ. He has mild cerebral palsy, which is a non-progressive condition, not a disease. It's usually caused by damage to the motor-controlled centers of the brain.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
His face beaming with pride and anticipation, the 13-year-old boy who was about to become a man intently watched the rabbi and the congregation. Taking his cues from the rabbi, he offered the traditional songs, prayers and blessings from the Torah in English, Hebrew and his native Russian. Eugene can't walk, talk or use his hands because of cerebral palsy. Yesterday, though, with the aid of a special computer synthesizer to help him "speak," he was able to fulfill a dream. He was bar mitzvahed at Congregation Beth Am Israel in Penn Valley.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
NEWARK, N.J. - So much attention was being directed at the man who preferred to stick to his own script of saying nothing. Media members - some armed with notepads and recorders and others with cameras and boom mikes - lined up 10 deep to get a glimpse of Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch on Tuesday afternoon at the Prudential Center. After six minutes and some interesting answers about his youth in Oakland, Lynch declared his talking portion of Super Bowl media day over. "Y'all have a good day," he said.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Cerebral palsy has left Jonathan Chiccino's body crippled and contorted. But it hasn't left a scratch on his keen intellect. The 32-year-old Temple University graduate with a 3.6 grade point average is setting his sights on law school. The barrister-to-be wants to practice either family or divorce law. Before Chiccino can join the bar, he must first clear a bar - the law school admissions test. It won't be easy. He'll need a waiver for special accommodations including extended time to complete the exam.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2001, an 8-year-old from Springfield, Delaware County, named Hayden Dahmm - then severely vision-impaired but with a remarkable talent for drawing - made headlines by creating a comic book that starred a crime-fighting toilet and that raised more than $10,000 for the families of victims of the 9/11 attacks. Two years ago, Dahmm began creating a new improbable story. He walked onto an unfamiliar Swarthmore College campus with a white cane - "bumping into things," in his words - and a dream of accomplishing something not many before him have: overcoming his now-total blindness to become an engineer.
NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Plymouth Whitemarsh had posted its biggest win of the season, a 28-23 triumph over Upper Dublin on Friday night, senior quarterback Connor Hanlon hurried off the field to celebrate with family members. Included in the group was his 15-year-old brother, Sean, who has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair. "He means so much to me," Connor Hanlon said. "He keeps me grounded. Whenever things get rough, I think of all that he's had to go through in his life. He's made so many trips to the hospital.
SPORTS
July 29, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEWARK, N.J. - Saturday's WNBA All-Star Game was supposed to be Elena Delle Donne's coronation. She was to start. She was the first rookie to receive the most votes. The game was to be a celebration, not just for her but for a league that has had an influx of young, marketable stars this year. But she suffered a concussion on Wednesday and announced on Friday that she will not play. On Thursday, fellow rookie and projected starter Brittney Griner announced she would also miss the game, with a sprained left knee.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
A 45-year-old Gloucester County man with cerebral palsy drowned while exercising in his family's inground pool Thursday, authorities said. The man, whose name was not released, was found at the bottom of the pool's deep end by family members who left him briefly unattended at the residence in the 1000 block of Spruce Avenue in Monroe Township, authorities said. He was rushed to Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Washington Township and pronounced dead at 6:06 p.m. The Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office and the Monroe Township police preliminarily determined the drowning was accidental.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Julia Burke didn't wear her leg braces to class, so her teacher told her to hit the floor for a few punishment push-ups. "Are you kidding me?" said Burke, 17, a student at Bishop McDevitt High School in Wyncote. Teacher Kenn Perry offered no jokes from his wheelchair, and Burke, who has cerebral palsy, gave him four. In the self-defense class that Perry teaches with fellow black belt Christopher Genell, tough talk comes with high expectations. Students get no easy outs because they have disabilities.
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amanda Long is immobile without her wheelchair. She lacks the coordination to lift a fork. And she has not spoken a word since she was 3. Yet Long's powerful artwork hangs on the walls of Tastykake Inc.'s corporate headquarters, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and 15 other buildings on the East Coast. Long, 21 of Center Valley, Pa., is one of more than 50 students who attend HMS School for Children With Cerebral Palsy in University City. Like the Irish painter and writer Christy Brown, portrayed in the film My Left Foot , Long and her fellow students have repurposed their bodies to overcome some of the restrictions imposed by their illness.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
This piece of financial common sense might appear to be elementary: Never give out your ATM personal identification number. But if you're Michael Anderson, it's not so elementary. Anderson, 31, of Merion, has cerebral palsy. Who but someone with Anderson's PIN could withdraw money for a man who uses a wheelchair and has limited use of his hands? And yes, he's been robbed by one of his attendants. Susan Tachau has seen this time and time again with many of her clients - and several times with Anderson, who is her son. As Tachau has counseled people with disabilities, she has discovered cases in which they have been ripped off and failed to realize it until their accounts have been emptied.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|