CollectionsCerebral Palsy
IN THE NEWS

Cerebral Palsy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | By Sharon Tubbs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1986, Kirk Vosbikian, a third grader at Parkway Elementary School, died of a rare form of cancer. Nine years later, his ordeal is inspiring a spirit of giving among the school's students and teachers, as evidenced by a display of affection for another ailing Parkway student. The teachers and students call their fund-raising campaign the Circle of Giving. So far, the students have donated $475.03 in pennies to Ronald McDonald House in Philadelphia. Plus, they sold about $500 worth of hoagies on Election Day for charities that benefit cerebral palsy.
NEWS
February 10, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A major report on the causes of cerebral palsy is renewing debate over how often, and how much, a physician is to blame when a baby is born with the disorder. The 95-page document, issued by two leading physicians groups, concludes that cerebral palsy is rarely caused by lack of oxygen, or asphyxia, during labor and delivery. It also sets out nine criteria for judging whether a child's disability is due to asphyxia, and whether it occurred during birth. Trial lawyers have denounced the report as self-serving and dangerous.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | By Marguerite P. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
Steven Roach always loved karate: He read about it, watched martial-arts movies and dreamed about studying it. But because he has cerebral palsy, Roach, 17, and almost everyone else thought he could never actually practice karate. Now, after four months of lessons, the Doylestown Township student has earned his second karate belt and says the martial art has done more for him than almost an entire lifetime of physical therapy for cerebral palsy, which damages the central nervous system.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The climb up the 72 steps that lead to the entrance of the Philadelphia Museum of Art began at 10 a.m. Saturday for the woman known as the Left-Thumb Blogger. Glenda Watson Hyatt, a 44-year-old writer with cerebral palsy whose autobiography is called I'll Do It Myself , didn't quite do it alone. The Rocky devotees wouldn't let her. Hyatt was surrounded by a Rocky impersonator, a newspaper executive who wrote a book about Rocky, and a band playing the Rocky theme.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | BY LARRY MCMULLEN
Butch Dow has what some people would call an attitude. Here's how his works: "I have a mild case of cerebral palsy," he was telling me last night. We were sitting at the kitchen table in his rowhouse in South Philadelphia. His aluminum crutches were propped against a cabinet. "How long could you stand on your legs without the crutches?" I asked. "About five seconds," he said. Then he told me how long it took from the time he was born until he first walked as a kid. "Thirteen years," he said.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
To be or not to be. Shakespeare chose simple words for the most complicated of questions, words so powerful that they have resonated for four centuries. When Heather Krause, a teaching artist with Walnut Street Theatre, saw how her students responded to those words, she had an outrageous idea: stage Hamlet with six high school-age actors with mental retardation and cerebral palsy, children so disabled that all are in wheelchairs and some cannot speak without the aid of machines.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New evidence suggests that cerebral palsy, a disabling disorder in newborns that causes a lifetime of problems, can be triggered by infections and blood clots in the fetus. Researchers found telltale signs of such infections and blood clots by tracking down certain chemicals in the blood of babies who were later diagnosed with cerebral palsy. The insight will not immediately lead to treatment, diagnosis or prevention, but provides important clues into the secrets of a maddeningly mysterious disease.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On her first day of kindergarten, Kelly Matula's anxieties were higher than those of most of her classmates. Along with the pressures of meeting new friends and learning to stand with others in a straight line, she had just been fitted with knee-high leg braces. Matula, who has cerebral palsy, already had an awkward gait. The braces made it even more so. Teachers and students watched fearfully as she teetered at the top of the slide before safely making her way down. On the second day of school, she tripped over a curb on her way in from recess and fell.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
After Jason's foster mother dresses him in the morning, he swings into action for the day. He sits down on the living room floor, takes off both shoes and one sock and twirls the sock around in the air. Then he pads out to the kitchen to eat anything that's set before him, as his appetite is zesty. Jason, 1 1/2, is in good health and has an average IQ. He has mild cerebral palsy, which is a non-progressive condition, not a disease. It's usually caused by damage to the motor-controlled centers of the brain.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
His face beaming with pride and anticipation, the 13-year-old boy who was about to become a man intently watched the rabbi and the congregation. Taking his cues from the rabbi, he offered the traditional songs, prayers and blessings from the Torah in English, Hebrew and his native Russian. Eugene can't walk, talk or use his hands because of cerebral palsy. Yesterday, though, with the aid of a special computer synthesizer to help him "speak," he was able to fulfill a dream. He was bar mitzvahed at Congregation Beth Am Israel in Penn Valley.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Julissa has a fun-loving, easygoing personality and a brilliant smile that draws people to her. The 6-year-old loves to be active and explore new places, so she was thrilled to have the opportunity recently to visit a discovery museum where children can enjoy a variety of fun activities. Julissa spent the afternoon dancing and playing. She especially liked the children's theater, where she dressed up and danced on stage. Diagnosed with cerebral palsy, Julissa is enrolled in the first grade in a school where she receives occupational, physical, and speech therapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Jayden has a vivid imagination and delights in pretending to do many things, such as cooking, cleaning, painting, and playing basketball. The 6-year-old is passionate about basketball and pretends to shoot a basketball into a hoop and make the shot. He is thrilled when someone plays "pretend" with him. Jayden's caretakers describe him as joyful, playful, happy, friendly, and loving. He gets along well with everyone he comes in contact with. At his previous school, he was known as the Mayor.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
The moment that St. John Chrysostom Church in Wallingford was accepting a national award for its efforts to welcome people with disabilities was the moment that Helen Howlett was coping with a familiar struggle. The paralegal was in the church lobby, tending to her nephew E.J., who has autism. The 6-year-old scooted from door to door, yelled out his name, and tried to escape the grasp of his harried aunt. "Even in an accessible church, it's not easy," said Howlett, of South Philadelphia, E.J.'s guardian.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITER
Longtime Philadelphia prosecutor Ed McCann will become the second-in-command at the Montgomery County District Attorney's office as it prepares for two of the biggest trials in county history. District Attorney Kevin Steele announced McCann's hiring as his first assistant Tuesday. "Ed brings tremendous experience to our prosecutorial team as well as strong leadership and managerial skills that will benefit the citizens of Montgomery County," Steele said in statement. McCann, 52,resigned in November from the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, where he spent 26 years and rose to the position of first assistant.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 26 years in the city prosecutor's office, First Assistant District Attorney Ed McCann resigned Monday, officials said. George D. Mosee Jr., the head of the office's juvenile division, will replace him, District Attorney Seth Williams said in a statement. McCann declined to say why he was leaving - although his name has been floated in courthouse circles as a possible addition to Mayor-elect Jim Kenney's administration. "I'm really proud of my 26 years of service," McCann said.
SPORTS
November 13, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer jneiburg@phillynews.com
IT WAS probably the hardest practice the Flyers had since training camp, and there weren't many smiles when players started filtering off the ice. Then Jake Voracek, who has yet to score this season, saw Liam Idzi and couldn't help but smile. Liam, 8, came from Madison, Wis., with his family and nurse, thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Liam is in a wheelchair because he's been diagnosed with cerebral palsy and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a difficult-to-treat form of epilepsy.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a 10-year-old boy who has cerebral palsy was amazed when Pope Francis started his trip to Philadelphia last month by blessing the child. Then the blessings continued to pour in. They came in donations of $10 and $25 and $500 and $1,000. And a $50,000 donation came from J.J. Abrams, the director of the coming Star Wars movie, and his wife. More than 940 donations totaling more than $115,000 have come in to help the family through the online fund-raiser "Michael Keating: Blessed By Pope Francis" on Crowdrise.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Julie and Derek saw Addie for the first time in a 15-second video clip: a stunned-looking toddler in a McDonald's T-shirt, with a paper sign bearing her name in Chinese characters. She had a club foot and was missing five fingers. Derek pictured his grandmother, whose dominant hand had fingers ending at the first knuckle, deftly chopping vegetables. Julie, an occupational therapist, was already planning the exercises that would help Addie learn to walk. But neither wavered: This child, living in a foster home 8,000 miles away, was their daughter.
NEWS
October 5, 2015
* THE LEFTOVERS. 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. In Season 2, creators Damon Lindelof and Tom Perrotta take us far beyond Perrotta's original novel, to a place called Miracle, a Texas town that was somehow immune from the vanishing of 2 percent of the world's population. Emmy winner Regina King (pictured right, with Carrie Coon) joins the cast. * HOMELAND. 9 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. Picking up nearly two years after the attack on the U.S. embassy in Islamabad, Season 5 places now-former CIA operative Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes)
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware moms Nancy Lemus and Luz Moyao drove to the papal Mass in Philadelphia early Saturday, hoping for a blessing with perhaps miraculous effects. Lemus' son Christopher Garcia, 10, has severe cerebral palsy and dystonia, a neurological muscle movement disorder. Moyao's son Angel Zavaleta, 8, has TARP Syndrome, a rare condition that causes several birth defects. Lemus and Moyao sat in the front row of the chapel at the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul waiting for Pope Francis, who was to walk past them.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|