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BUSINESS
March 30, 2007 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The race for prestige and profits in cervical-cancer vaccines intensified yesterday when GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. formally asked U.S. regulators to approve its vaccine, Cervarix. The long-expected application to the Food and Drug Administration - for use in adolescent girls and possibly young women - puts Cervarix at least 16 months behind Merck & Co. Inc., maker of Gardasil. Cervarix has been tested and prepared for market partly at GlaxoSmithKline facilities in Upper Merion and Philadelphia, part of the U.S. headquarters of the London-based company.
NEWS
January 18, 2007 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A global marketing war over a potentially multibillion-dollar cancer vaccine is about to escalate, with its epicenter in the tranquil corporate campuses of Montgomery County. GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. said yesterday that it would sponsor an unusual clinical trial of two cancer vaccines directly against each other to see which works better - Gardasil, made by Merck & Co. Inc., or its own experimental vaccine Cervarix, which is expected to hit the market this year. It is the kind of expensive, high-risk comparison that companies undertake only if forced to by regulators or only for a high-profit prescription drug - not for a vaccine.
NEWS
September 10, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Government advisers yesterday recommended federal approval of Cervarix, the GlaxoSmithKline cervical cancer vaccine, after reviewing studies showing it is significantly more effective than Gardasil, the rival vaccine made by Merck & Co. But Merck's product, which has had a three-year head start in the U.S. market, got another boost yesterday when the committee urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to expand its approval for prevention of...
BUSINESS
October 27, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and AstraZeneca P.L.C. beat analysts' projections with strong quarterly results yesterday, although both sank on Wall Street because of unexpected hitches with new products. Nexium-maker AstraZeneca, based in London with U.S. headquarters north of Wilmington, said revenue was up 13 percent over the same period a year earlier, to $6.52 billion from $5.79 billion. Earnings rose 29 percent, to $1.59 billion, or $1.01 a share, from $1.23 billion, or 76 cents a share.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a green light from regulators, Merck & Co. Inc. has begun deploying 1,500 freshly trained salespeople and unleashing a huge marketing campaign around a delicate topic: cancer and sex. The Food and Drug Administration approved Merck's cervical-cancer vaccine Gardasil yesterday, inaugurating a vaccine market potentially worth several billion dollars a year, with the Philadelphia area at its core. Gardasil will be manufactured and marketed from Merck's West Point complex. GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - A vaccine against a cervical cancer virus has cut infections in teen girls by half, according to a study released Wednesday. The study confirms research done before the HPV vaccine came on the market in 2006. But this is the first evidence of how well it works now that it is in general use. "These are striking results, and I think they should be a wake-up call that we need to increase vaccination rates," said Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2008 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. reported a 10 percent drop in fourth-quarter net income yesterday. A handful of its key drugs will lose patent protection this year, and executives are projecting a percentage decline in earnings per share in the mid-single digits for 2008. The combined cocktail of numbers drove down the company's shares in London nearly 8 percent. The company's U.S. shares fell 7.61 percent - dropping $3.49, to $42.39 - in New York. The performance could be summed up by a single drug: Avandia.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia-based research chief of GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., the world's second-largest drugmaker, is leaving to work for a major foundation that has funded some of the company's vaccine research. Tadataka "Tachi" Yamada, 60, will become executive director of the global health program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, in Seattle, the company and foundation said yesterday. Succeeding Yamada on June 1 will be Moncef Slaoui, 46, GlaxoSmithKline's current head of worldwide business development and external research alliances, the company said.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
If parents and their adolescent daughters knew that the HPV vaccine protects against cervical cancer, they'd be more likely to get the shots than uninformed people, right? Um, no, judging from a University of Pennsylvania study that tested the seemingly logical assumption. The yearlong study of 360 parents and teen girls from low-income, predominantly African American neighborhoods in Philadelphia found no link between knowledge about the vaccine and actual immunization, even though it was available free at city health clinics.
NEWS
July 4, 2005 | By Fawn Vrazo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two major pharmaceutical companies are racing to market the world's first cervical cancer vaccines. But at least a year before the drugs become available, conservative and liberal groups are fighting over the propriety of giving vaccines against a sexually transmitted disease to children as young as 9 or 10. Merck & Co.'s Gardasil and Cervarix from GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) prevent infection by two strains of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), which cause most cases of cervical cancer.
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NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
If parents and their adolescent daughters knew that the HPV vaccine protects against cervical cancer, they'd be more likely to get the shots than uninformed people, right? Um, no, judging from a University of Pennsylvania study that tested the seemingly logical assumption. The yearlong study of 360 parents and teen girls from low-income, predominantly African American neighborhoods in Philadelphia found no link between knowledge about the vaccine and actual immunization, even though it was available free at city health clinics.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - A vaccine against a cervical cancer virus has cut infections in teen girls by half, according to a study released Wednesday. The study confirms research done before the HPV vaccine came on the market in 2006. But this is the first evidence of how well it works now that it is in general use. "These are striking results, and I think they should be a wake-up call that we need to increase vaccination rates," said Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
September 10, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Government advisers yesterday recommended federal approval of Cervarix, the GlaxoSmithKline cervical cancer vaccine, after reviewing studies showing it is significantly more effective than Gardasil, the rival vaccine made by Merck & Co. But Merck's product, which has had a three-year head start in the U.S. market, got another boost yesterday when the committee urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to expand its approval for prevention of...
BUSINESS
February 8, 2008 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. reported a 10 percent drop in fourth-quarter net income yesterday. A handful of its key drugs will lose patent protection this year, and executives are projecting a percentage decline in earnings per share in the mid-single digits for 2008. The combined cocktail of numbers drove down the company's shares in London nearly 8 percent. The company's U.S. shares fell 7.61 percent - dropping $3.49, to $42.39 - in New York. The performance could be summed up by a single drug: Avandia.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2007 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s Cervarix cervical-cancer vaccine will be delayed in the United States because federal regulators demanded more information, the company said yesterday. The Food and Drug Administration is evaluating the drug before granting marketing approval. The vaccine protects girls and women against two strains of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus that causes cervical cancer. The delay could be six months to two years if the drugmaker needs to submit results from a clinical trial, Panmure Gordon & Co. P.L.C.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2007 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The race for prestige and profits in cervical-cancer vaccines intensified yesterday when GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. formally asked U.S. regulators to approve its vaccine, Cervarix. The long-expected application to the Food and Drug Administration - for use in adolescent girls and possibly young women - puts Cervarix at least 16 months behind Merck & Co. Inc., maker of Gardasil. Cervarix has been tested and prepared for market partly at GlaxoSmithKline facilities in Upper Merion and Philadelphia, part of the U.S. headquarters of the London-based company.
NEWS
January 18, 2007 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A global marketing war over a potentially multibillion-dollar cancer vaccine is about to escalate, with its epicenter in the tranquil corporate campuses of Montgomery County. GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. said yesterday that it would sponsor an unusual clinical trial of two cancer vaccines directly against each other to see which works better - Gardasil, made by Merck & Co. Inc., or its own experimental vaccine Cervarix, which is expected to hit the market this year. It is the kind of expensive, high-risk comparison that companies undertake only if forced to by regulators or only for a high-profit prescription drug - not for a vaccine.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and AstraZeneca P.L.C. beat analysts' projections with strong quarterly results yesterday, although both sank on Wall Street because of unexpected hitches with new products. Nexium-maker AstraZeneca, based in London with U.S. headquarters north of Wilmington, said revenue was up 13 percent over the same period a year earlier, to $6.52 billion from $5.79 billion. Earnings rose 29 percent, to $1.59 billion, or $1.01 a share, from $1.23 billion, or 76 cents a share.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a green light from regulators, Merck & Co. Inc. has begun deploying 1,500 freshly trained salespeople and unleashing a huge marketing campaign around a delicate topic: cancer and sex. The Food and Drug Administration approved Merck's cervical-cancer vaccine Gardasil yesterday, inaugurating a vaccine market potentially worth several billion dollars a year, with the Philadelphia area at its core. Gardasil will be manufactured and marketed from Merck's West Point complex. GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A vaccine to prevent cervical cancer won endorsement yesterday by a federal medical panel, a key step toward approval for use by millions of girls and young women perhaps by July. Gardasil, which would be manufactured in the Philadelphia suburbs by Merck & Co. Inc., still needs final approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but the agency typically takes its panels' advice. Merck predicted Gardasil would prevent about 350,000 cases yearly of cervical cancer worldwide within two decades, when all girls vaccinated as infants will have entered high-risk adulthood.
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