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Cervical Cancer

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NEWS
June 15, 2005 | By MARGARET O. KIRK For the Daily News
THE KEY to cancer research - and finding a cure - is identifying cancer's Achilles' heel, argues Dr. Eliav Barr, senior director of clinical research at Merck Research Laboratories in West Point, Montgomery County. And when it comes to cervical cancer, that's exactly what he has done. Since 1995, Barr and his team of Merck researchers have been working to develop a vaccine that can prevent cervical cancer. Now in its third clinical trial, the vaccine is scheduled to go to the Food and Drug Administration for approval later this year, a process that takes from 10 to 12 months.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A vaccine against cervical cancer, being developed by Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Blue Bell, produced positive results in a small sample of 18 women. The vaccine prompted their bodies to produce T cells - a type of white blood cell - that, in a separate lab test, recognized cells with tumor proteins and killed them. The researchers, including a team from the University of Pennsylvania, say the paper in the journal Science Translational Medicine is the first to show that a DNA vaccine alone produced a high level of immunity in people.
NEWS
June 19, 2006
The Food and Drug Administration has delivered an important victory for girls and women in the fight against cervical cancer. In a decision late last week, the FDA approved the sale of the first vaccine to prevent cervical cancer, which claims the lives of 3,900 women in the United States annually. The new drug, Gardasil, is manufactured by Merck & Co. and is expected to cost more than $300 for a three-shot course. Gardasil kills two strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV)
NEWS
March 26, 2006
Sex can give you cancer. Well, not exactly. But a specific sexually transmitted disease - human papillomavirus (HPV) - has been found to cause cervical cancer. That being the case, one would think a new vaccine that prevents cervical cancer would be universally hailed. But the fact that the drug is most effective when administered to children has made it controversial. Some family values groups worried that promiscuity might increase if adolescents knew they'd been vaccinated to ward off a sexually transmitted disease.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Too many doctors are testing the wrong women, or using the wrong test, for a virus that causes cervical cancer. The days of one-size-fits-all screening for cervical cancer are long gone. How often to get a Pap smear - and whether to be tested for the cancer-causing virus HPV at the same time - depend on your age and other circumstances. But a study reported Monday that a surprising number of doctors and clinics aren't following guidelines from major medical groups, suggesting that a lot of women are getting unnecessary tests.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Provocative new research might help explain why black women are so much more likely than white women to develop and die of cervical cancer. They seem to have more trouble clearing HPV, the virus that causes the disease. Doctors have long thought that less access to screening and follow-up health care were the reasons black women are 40 percent more likely than white women to develop cervical cancer and twice as likely to die from it. The new study involving young college women suggests that there might be a biological explanation for the racial disparity, too. If further study confirms this novel finding, it would make the HPV vaccine even more important for black women, said Worta McCaskill-Stevens, a prevention specialist at the National Cancer Institute.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
There's more news on cancer screening tests - this time for women. Scientists advising the government say a Pap test is a good way to screen young and middle-aged women for cervical cancer, and it's needed only once every three years. But they say there is not enough evidence yet to back testing for HPV, the virus that causes the disease. That's at odds with the American Cancer Society and other groups, which have long said that both tests can be an option for women over 30. Those groups and the government advisory task force separately plan to release proposed new guidelines for cervical cancer screening on Wednesday and invite public comment.
NEWS
October 7, 2005 | By Fawn Vrazo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A long-sought dream - a vaccine to eradicate most cases of deadly cervical cancer worldwide - moved closer to realization yesterday with Merck & Co. Inc.'s announcement that short-term studies had shown its drug to be 100 percent effective in combating the virus that causes the disease. The studies, which tested Merck's Gardasil vaccine for six months on more than 12,000 women in 13 countries, are the most important clinical trial toward gaining Food and Drug Administration approval later this year.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
Still more evidence that sex with many partners can have lethal consequences: Recent medical studies have linked another dangerous virus - passed silently between partners - to a disease that can kill. Several strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) have been identified as a cause of women's cancers of the cervix, vagina and vulva and as a possible cause of cancer of the penis in men and anal cancer in gay men, researchers say. The link to cervical cancer is strongest: HPV infection is found in about 90 percent of patients who develop precancerous cervical changes, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Editor's note: This is the first in an occasional series about key people and discoveries at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, this year marking its 250th anniversary.   Fifty years ago, most scientists dismissed the idea that cancer could be seeded by the same kind of germ as colds and the flu. Not Gertrude and Werner Henle, husband-and-wife virologists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 16, 2015
ISSUE | KANE'S FUTURE No rush to judge As a former elected official who lived through a highly publicized grand jury investigation that ended without a finding of wrongdoing - shortly after I lost my campaign for reelection - I would advise waiting for the facts before recommending that state Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane resign ("Kane may need to step down," Jan. 11). Indictments and convictions matter. Public allegations from an unnamed source (in my case, a district attorney of the opposite political party)
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
If parents and their adolescent daughters knew that the HPV vaccine protects against cervical cancer, they'd be more likely to get the shots than uninformed people, right? Um, no, judging from a University of Pennsylvania study that tested the seemingly logical assumption. The yearlong study of 360 parents and teen girls from low-income, predominantly African American neighborhoods in Philadelphia found no link between knowledge about the vaccine and actual immunization, even though it was available free at city health clinics.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
The number of teenage girls in the United States vaccinated against human papillomavirus, a sexually transmitted infection that can cause cervical cancer, has not risen, though the shot can dramatically reduce the risk of the virus. Vaccinations among 13- to 17-year-old girls remained unchanged last year from 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fifty-four percent of the teenagers received one dose of HPV vaccine and 33 percent got all three prescribed doses, the CDC reported.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - A vaccine against a cervical cancer virus has cut infections in teen girls by half, according to a study released Wednesday. The study confirms research done before the HPV vaccine came on the market in 2006. But this is the first evidence of how well it works now that it is in general use. "These are striking results, and I think they should be a wake-up call that we need to increase vaccination rates," said Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
SPORTS
May 13, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Denise Benn spent Mother's Day last year enduring the effects of chemotherapy, trying to treat the cancer that invaded her colon and worried her five sons. One of those sons is Arrelious Benn, now an Eagles wide receiver and in better spirits than a year ago. One of the reasons is the health of Denise, whose cancer is in remission. On Saturday, one day before Mother's Day, Denise joined her five sons on Team Arrelious, created for the Susan G. Komen Global Race for the Cure, a 5K walk/run in his native Washington.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Multinational drug companies, like other businesses, see Africa as an emerging market with tremendous opportunities and challenges, and that was a backdrop to Thursday's announcements of two programs designed to deliver more medicine and better health care to the continent. Merck & Co. and GlaxoSmithKline Plc joined the GAVI alliance in announcing from Cape Town, South Africa, an agreement to supply human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine at lower prices to developing countries to help girls and women in those nations avoid cervical cancer.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia researchers have detected part of the virus that causes cervical cancer in a surprising place: a congenital brain malformation that causes an intractable form of epilepsy in children. This is the first study to uncover evidence of the microbe - human papillomavirus (HPV) - in the brain. It is also the first to suggest that an infection in the fetal brain leads to the malformation, which has no known genetic or environmental cause. Peter Crino, a neurologist in the Shriners Hospitals Pediatric Research Center at Temple University, conducted the study with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new studies show American women are getting way too much of a good thing: cervical cancer screening. This may come as a surprise to women, who for half a century have been indoctrinated to get a Pap smear every year. As a result, cervical cancer has become relatively uncommon and highly preventable. But over the last decade, expert groups have recommended less frequent screening, responding to the evolving science and technology. Last year, for the first time, three key groups got together to issue uniform guidelines.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
From today through Oct. 17, Philly.com and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series culminates in a special Philly.com/health Inquirer section on Oct. 18, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . "My little Sister, Debbi, was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer when she was 29 years old and pregnant," said Traci Walters of Texas. "They induced labor about a month early because the tumor was growing so fast because she was pregnant.
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