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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
LAS VEGAS - HAL, do we still have a problem? As the sneaky computer character in the classic sci-fi flick "2001: A Space Odyssey," you put out those malevolent, controlling vibes. But now, in 2014, you're no scary villain - you're the dude! In fact, you are resonating all over this week's International CES tech fest, here in Vegas - although in a much kinder, gentler fashion. There's a new catchphrase going round - "The Internet of Everything," or IoE - to describe human codependence and willing surrender to the global networks, deep data banks, tracking technology and eerily predictive software that help steer today's high-tech goods and services to give us what we want, when we want it. There's even a new home automation system named HAL debuting at the consumer electronics show.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012
IF YOU'RE expecting a "Best of CES" awards column from the Gizmo Guy, think again. Yes, I was in Las Vegas at the consumer electronics megashow from start to finish, and I figure I was exposed to maybe 400 new products at CES. Sounds impressive, huh? But according to Consumer Electronics Association CEO Gary Shapiro, there were "20,000 product introductions" at this year's trade show, sprawled over a record-breaking 1.8 million square feet of exhibit space. That means I saw all of 2 percent of the show's offerings.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
LATE-NIGHT TV host Craig Ferguson took rude pleasure last week, pondering what CES means: "Cucumber-Enhanced Shorts?" Don't think so. The giant Las Vegas tech fair no longer calls itself the Consumer Electronics Show, but rather International CES. That helps with branding/trademarks and in pulling more foreign exhibitors. The name vagueness also reflects the diversified nature of 20,000-plus products unveiled at the trade show, with the significant refocusing of old-line exhibitors like Panasonic, Sony and Toshiba into more profitable, "business-to-business" products serving, say, the medical, construction and automotive industries.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - In only a few years, smartphones and tablets have dramatically altered how people connect with one another via the Internet. This year's International Consumer Electronics Show, which opens here Tuesday, illustrates how the next frontier centers on using the Web to connect devices. The long-heralded "Internet of things" is finally taking center stage. Interconnected devices were everywhere this weekend as journalists and bloggers got an early look at some of the 3,200 exhibitors expected to draw 150,000 visitors to the massive show.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Concert pianist Bob Taub watched his teenage daughter strive to learn the violin, and wondered: Could he design a digital tool to help her see and hear the exact notes where she was going astray? Last week, six years into an add-on career as an inventor, Taub was here at the massive International Consumer Electronics Show, moving his idea a bit closer to reality. His invention, MuseAmi, is already at the heart of an iPhone app that may prove to be the ultimate Karaoke tool.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013
CAN WE BE frank? Numerous media organizations taking the pulse of the giant CES consumer electronics show put out "Best of CES" lists. But with 3,300 exhibitors unveiling something like 20,000 new products, who can claim to have judged them all? And this year, it became painfully clear the choices can be manipulated. Popular tech website CNET was forced to disqualify the innovative, second-generation DISH Hopper satellite receiver/DVR from its "best of" awards. CBS, a sister operation of CNET parent company Viacom, is suing DISH over Hopper's automatic commercial skip feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1986 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
When the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) comes here each June, McCormick Place becomes more than an exhibit hall. For four days, it is transformed into the hypercharged nerve center of the $35 billion audio, video and computer industries, filled with manufacturers showing off their flashiest equipment and retailers making decisions on what - and how much - to buy. The 20th summer CES - another CES is held each January in Las Vegas - opened yesterday,...
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | By Stephen C. Row, Special to The Inquirer
New Hope-Solebury has taken a bold new step in experimental education, state Department of Education representative Jean diSabatino told the school board Monday night. Speaking to more than 30 residents, parents and the newly installed school board, diSabatino praised New Hope-Solebury for participating in a drastic restructuring of education through a program called the Coalition for Essential Schools (CES) The plan puts less emphasis on a broad-based survey of all disciplines and a greater emphasis on mastery of skills employing a variety of disciplines.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2012 | By Peter Svensson, Associated Press
The largest trade show in the Americas must be a great place to show off new products, right? Wrong. The International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is quickly becoming a launch pad for products that fall flat. When the annual gathering kicks off next week, organizers expect more than 140,000 people to descend on Las Vegas. They will mill around 1.8 million square feet of booths and exhibits, equivalent to 31 football fields. The 2,800 or so exhibitors are hoping to set the tone for the year by showing off tons of tablet computers, throngs of 3-D TVs, and untold numbers of slim, light laptops called ultrabooks.
NEWS
July 5, 1994 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faced with declining enrollment at many of its two-year campuses across the state, including Ogontz in Montgomery County and the Delaware County campus in Media, Pennsylvania State University is planning cutbacks to offset a projected $12 million shortfall in tuition income. The cutbacks, to be spread out over the next two academic years, include laying off workers, eliminating unfilled positions and deferring projects. In addition, some schools have begun to look into joint efforts between campuses.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
LATE-NIGHT TV host Craig Ferguson took rude pleasure last week, pondering what CES means: "Cucumber-Enhanced Shorts?" Don't think so. The giant Las Vegas tech fair no longer calls itself the Consumer Electronics Show, but rather International CES. That helps with branding/trademarks and in pulling more foreign exhibitors. The name vagueness also reflects the diversified nature of 20,000-plus products unveiled at the trade show, with the significant refocusing of old-line exhibitors like Panasonic, Sony and Toshiba into more profitable, "business-to-business" products serving, say, the medical, construction and automotive industries.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
LAS VEGAS - HAL, do we still have a problem? As the sneaky computer character in the classic sci-fi flick "2001: A Space Odyssey," you put out those malevolent, controlling vibes. But now, in 2014, you're no scary villain - you're the dude! In fact, you are resonating all over this week's International CES tech fest, here in Vegas - although in a much kinder, gentler fashion. There's a new catchphrase going round - "The Internet of Everything," or IoE - to describe human codependence and willing surrender to the global networks, deep data banks, tracking technology and eerily predictive software that help steer today's high-tech goods and services to give us what we want, when we want it. There's even a new home automation system named HAL debuting at the consumer electronics show.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - In only a few years, smartphones and tablets have dramatically altered how people connect with one another via the Internet. This year's International Consumer Electronics Show, which opens here Tuesday, illustrates how the next frontier centers on using the Web to connect devices. The long-heralded "Internet of things" is finally taking center stage. Interconnected devices were everywhere this weekend as journalists and bloggers got an early look at some of the 3,200 exhibitors expected to draw 150,000 visitors to the massive show.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013
CAN WE BE frank? Numerous media organizations taking the pulse of the giant CES consumer electronics show put out "Best of CES" lists. But with 3,300 exhibitors unveiling something like 20,000 new products, who can claim to have judged them all? And this year, it became painfully clear the choices can be manipulated. Popular tech website CNET was forced to disqualify the innovative, second-generation DISH Hopper satellite receiver/DVR from its "best of" awards. CBS, a sister operation of CNET parent company Viacom, is suing DISH over Hopper's automatic commercial skip feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012
IF YOU'RE expecting a "Best of CES" awards column from the Gizmo Guy, think again. Yes, I was in Las Vegas at the consumer electronics megashow from start to finish, and I figure I was exposed to maybe 400 new products at CES. Sounds impressive, huh? But according to Consumer Electronics Association CEO Gary Shapiro, there were "20,000 product introductions" at this year's trade show, sprawled over a record-breaking 1.8 million square feet of exhibit space. That means I saw all of 2 percent of the show's offerings.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Concert pianist Bob Taub watched his teenage daughter strive to learn the violin, and wondered: Could he design a digital tool to help her see and hear the exact notes where she was going astray? Last week, six years into an add-on career as an inventor, Taub was here at the massive International Consumer Electronics Show, moving his idea a bit closer to reality. His invention, MuseAmi, is already at the heart of an iPhone app that may prove to be the ultimate Karaoke tool.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2012
OPENING TODAY in Las Vegas, the 2012 edition of the International CES is awash in Internet-connected and higher-definition video screens, razor-thin Ultrabook laptops and iPad wannabees - some at dirt-cheap prices. The enormous consumer electronics (and beyond) trade show also is flaunting dramatic growth in categories ranging from health and fitness to voice- and motion- controlled . . . everything. But for this seasoned showgoer, the most compelling CES story is how veteran companies are striving to make their products relevant.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2012 | By Peter Svensson, Associated Press
The largest trade show in the Americas must be a great place to show off new products, right? Wrong. The International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is quickly becoming a launch pad for products that fall flat. When the annual gathering kicks off next week, organizers expect more than 140,000 people to descend on Las Vegas. They will mill around 1.8 million square feet of booths and exhibits, equivalent to 31 football fields. The 2,800 or so exhibitors are hoping to set the tone for the year by showing off tons of tablet computers, throngs of 3-D TVs, and untold numbers of slim, light laptops called ultrabooks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2011
THE GIZMO: The "all connected" CES 2011 Report. TECHNO TOGETHERNESS: The promise of "connected electronics" - gizmos capable of communicating and sharing content with kindred products and sites - has been well-fulfilled in recent years with hot-selling smart phones, computers, game systems and Internet-enabled TVs. But at last week's International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, it seemed almost EVERYTHING new and cool had an...
BUSINESS
January 13, 2005 | By John J. Fried INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Consumers whose lives revolve around home entertainment - music, digital photos, TV shows and movies - face more frustration than fun in the near future. That was about the only inescapable conclusion one could take away from last week's Consumer Electronics Show. Manufacturers of computers, televisions, MP3 players, video recorders and game boxes showed off perhaps their most dazzling array of products ever. But looming everywhere - in the booths crowded by the 130,000-plus who thronged the show, and in panel discussions before standing-room-only audiences in 500-seat meeting rooms - was this troubling question: Is the consumer electronics industry any nearer to making it easy for consumers to access the thousands of songs and photos and the hours of recorded TV shows and movies they have accumulated, no matter what device they are stored in and no matter where they want that access?
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