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BUSINESS
May 14, 1996 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 43 years, Edward and Mary Cipressi started family traditions with their custom dinette sets. Customer Jerry Klein bought a drop-leaf dinette set with two chairs from the Cipressis' Kitchen Karnival store in Northeast Philadelphia 10 years ago. When his son got married not too long ago, he headed to the Kitchen Karnival to do the same. But chain-store competition, lower disposable incomes and their own failing health conspired to sap the vitality from their business. So at 83 and 81, respectively, Edward and Mary Cipressi, a couple married for 63 years, decided to close their business.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | By Greg McCullough, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For 58 years, Tiny Towne has catered to the needs of children, with its veteran staff selling a range of eclectic merchandise that includes everything from Boy Scout uniforms to pint-size furniture. The oldest retailer on 69th Street, the store survived the economic hardships brought on by World War II and SEPTA strikes. What it cannot withstand, however, has been consumers' gradual defection to flashy national chain stores. Next month, Tiny Towne will shut down. Store owner Stuart Wenger, 48, said that in the face of hard times, employees had found it increasingly difficult to maintain the store's standard of service.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
THIS SATURDAY CAN be a different type of shopping day. No need to worry about trying to find a parking space at a suburban mall, or being overrun by hordes of shoppers acting as if they had just stumbled onto the newest bazaar in Istanbul. Instead, because it's Small-Business Saturday, you might consider visiting a small, intimate, popup boutique, say, in Center City, where you can pick up a WeWood watch. I'm thinking of Kembrel - which has two locations, on Locust near 12th and on Chestnut near 18th - a small-biz alternative to the big-box retailers and chain stores.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1997 | By Mary Blakinger, FOR THE INQUIRER
At the Main Line's Suburban Square, regarded as a jewel among the region's shopping centers, the holiday season has been welcomed with red bows and strings of white lights festooning the sidewalk trees. But merchants are looking toward the New Year with a less festive sentiment: uncertainty. Intershop Holding Ltd., Suburban Square's Swiss owner, has been looking for a buyer for all its U.S. properties for nine months, said spokesman Dave Collins, in Dallas. That leaves merchants wondering: Will rents rise?
BUSINESS
March 20, 2002 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jones Apparel Group Inc., moving to increase its sales in moderately priced and discount retail stores, announced yesterday that it had an agreement to acquire Gloria Vanderbilt Apparel Co. and the Vanderbilt brand name for $138 million. Jones, which is based in Bristol, said it would pay $80 million in cash and $20 million in stock, plus assume about $38 million in debt, for Gloria Vanderbilt, a designer and distributor of stretch and twill jeans for women. The price may increase if certain earnings goals are met in the first year, Jones said in a statement.
NEWS
December 12, 2007 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wegmans supermarket chain plans to open a liquor mart inside its Cherry Hill store, making it one of the few groceries in South Jersey to sell alcohol. Jason Wehle, a son-in-law of chief executive officer Danny Wegman's, paid $500,000 in October for the retail liquor license formerly held by Corkscrewed on Marlton Pike. Wegmans will carve out space in its Route 70 store to sell liquor, spokeswoman Jeanne Colleluori said yesterday. She said that planning was in the early stages, and that she did not know when liquor sales would begin.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | By Vicki McClure, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At the age of 19, Mike Fiscaro Jr. was preparing flight meals for United Airlines yet yearned to open his own music store. So his father, a technician at Bell Atlantic, cashed in his retirement account and handed him $100,000 in savings to start the Music Factory. Located across Hurffville Cross Keys Road from Washington Township High School, the nine-year-old business now sells $750,000 annually in CDs and vinyl recordings. Business has gone so well that Fiscaro's father retired from the phone company and works full time in the store.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finding a job has been tough, especially for those who just graduated from college. The job market is better if you are in health care, and a lot better if you have a pharmacy degree. That's according to the area's pharmacy schools, whose graduates are enjoying multiple job offers at a time when other new grads can barely get an interview. Graduates of Philadelphia's two pharmacy schools - University of the Sciences and Temple University School of Pharmacy - often have four or five offers from retail chain stores, hospitals and companies willing to pay them $80,000 or more to fill prescriptions and dispense medication advice to patients.
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After more than a year of surveys, studies and community meetings, planners here are ready for the good stuff: upscale shops, tree-lined streets, and pedestrian-friendly traffic. The township's Economic Development Task Force has met with urban planners and completed details for sprucing up commercial districts in Glenside, Elkins Park and Cheltenham Village and along East Cheltenham Avenue. The Board of Commissioners must sign off on the revitalization plans, but a date for the vote has not been set. The project has two components, said Joel Johnson, manager of the Main Street program: beautifying streetscapes and slowing the rush of traffic, and retaining businesses while attracting new ones.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A group of local civic leaders is gearing up to attempt the unimaginable: Make Narberth cuter. By most accounts, tiny half-square-mile Narberth ranks at the top of the quaint scale for its tidy blocks of single-family homes, its friendly central park, its family grocer who knows customers by their first and last names and, of course, its thriving, altogether charming, downtown - all two blocks of it. But in the age of the mega-mall and...
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BUSINESS
December 24, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
In the battle for city dwellers, big-box retailer Target Corp. plans to open three mini-stores in Center City over the next 22 months. The idea: Bring a slimmed-down Target to the neighborhoods rather than have residents venture out to the suburbs. The company is betting that a vast number of millennials - 18- to 34-year-olds who are driving much of consumer demand these days, along with longtime residents and those returning to the city - will populate its "flexible format" stores, miniversions of a typical Target.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As RadioShack and other troubled chains weigh plans for closing stores across the United States, others see an opportunity to grab new locations. "We have a lease" to take over one of the 29 Philadelphia-area RadioShack stores, and are negotiating for others from Boston to Austin, Texas, says Todd Leff , chief executive of Hand & Stone Massage and Facial Spas , a 200-store franchise based in Hamilton, N.J. The chain has 35 locations in the Philadelphia area...
NEWS
July 2, 2013
Q: How long have you been involved with the business? A: I apprenticed all my life to run the store. I worked here after school, on Saturdays. Then, when I went to Temple, I came in after classes. I did other small jobs but always came back because I wanted to keep the business open. Q: How have you managed to stay in business so long? A: We have hands-on customer service. When customers walk in the door, we greet them and we find out what they need. If we don't have it, we special-order it. Q: What's the biggest challenge to keeping the business alive?
NEWS
November 23, 2012
THIS SATURDAY CAN be a different type of shopping day. No need to worry about trying to find a parking space at a suburban mall, or being overrun by hordes of shoppers acting as if they had just stumbled onto the newest bazaar in Istanbul. Instead, because it's Small-Business Saturday, you might consider visiting a small, intimate, popup boutique, say, in Center City, where you can pick up a WeWood watch. I'm thinking of Kembrel - which has two locations, on Locust near 12th and on Chestnut near 18th - a small-biz alternative to the big-box retailers and chain stores.
NEWS
May 12, 2008
YOU COULDN'T LEAVE Lee L. Santoro alone on a street corner for any length of time without his being surrounded by children, their parents and even their pets. His granddaughter Jessica Griffin would go to a museum or restaurant with him, leave him outside the entrance to retrieve the car, and by the time she got back, the old man was the center of attention by a group of strangers. What was it about Lee that drew people to him? Was it the aura of a man who always saw the good and positive in everything, the born salesman who charmed his customers, the friendly man who was genuinely interested in others and liked to strike up conversations wherever he went?
NEWS
December 12, 2007 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wegmans supermarket chain plans to open a liquor mart inside its Cherry Hill store, making it one of the few groceries in South Jersey to sell alcohol. Jason Wehle, a son-in-law of chief executive officer Danny Wegman's, paid $500,000 in October for the retail liquor license formerly held by Corkscrewed on Marlton Pike. Wegmans will carve out space in its Route 70 store to sell liquor, spokeswoman Jeanne Colleluori said yesterday. She said that planning was in the early stages, and that she did not know when liquor sales would begin.
NEWS
December 3, 2006 | By Matt Sandy FOR THE INQUIRER
On the Main Line, the evolutionary axiom "adapt to survive" is illustrated on the amply stocked shelves of Mapes, a "family store" that has existed in some form since the late 19th century. Opened in 1897 by the Davis family, the original location on Haverford Avenue in Narberth was a haunt of Bert Bell, the first commissioner of the National Football League. Currently, the Mapes realm encompasses two 5 & 10s, two toy stores, one card shop, and one hardware store spread among Narberth, Ardmore and Havertown.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2006 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Small-business owners in Center City are seeing sharp increases in leasing costs because of the booming market for retail space and restaurants, speakers at an economic forecast session said yesterday. The panelists at the meeting, organized by the Center City Proprietors Association, said the trend was triggered by national chains' seeking new locations. Loehmann's, the discount designer clothing chain, for example, will move this spring into a vacant spot on Chestnut Street near 15th Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2004 | By BECKY BATCHA -- For the Daily News
SOMETIMES IT seems that Philadelphians are genetically programmed to shop on east-west streets, like Market and Walnut. But now that Broad Street has attracted a critical mass of retailers - on top of all those shiny new cultural spaces and restaurants - it's worth reconsidering the city's Y-axis as a holiday shopping destination. The mix of stores on and near the Avenue of the Arts is appropriately eclectic for an arts district, with a handful of popular retail chains like Banana Republic and Tower Records, a couple of Philly institutions like I. Goldberg and Mitchell & Ness, two unusually good gift shops inside major cultural venues, and a brave new cluster of high-end boutiques on lowbrow 13th Street, one block over.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finding a job has been tough, especially for those who just graduated from college. The job market is better if you are in health care, and a lot better if you have a pharmacy degree. That's according to the area's pharmacy schools, whose graduates are enjoying multiple job offers at a time when other new grads can barely get an interview. Graduates of Philadelphia's two pharmacy schools - University of the Sciences and Temple University School of Pharmacy - often have four or five offers from retail chain stores, hospitals and companies willing to pay them $80,000 or more to fill prescriptions and dispense medication advice to patients.
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