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Chaka Fattah

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NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harrah's Philadelphia has sued U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's son for allegedly bouncing $16,000 worth of checks at the Delaware County casino, the latest in a string of lawsuits filed since the FBI raided the young Fattah's home and office in February. Just two weeks ago the Philadelphia Federal Credit Union sued Chaka Fattah Jr. for $17,467, alleging that he failed to make payments on a loan there. Ronald Sarachan, a lawyer for Fattah Jr., to declined comment about the suits. Attorneys for Harrah's did not respond to requests for comment.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
The crimes Chaka Fattah was found guilty of Tuesday won't be mistaken for small-time. Money stolen to pay off illicit political debt was laundered through charities and companies. A network of aides and associates handled the details. Bribes were masked as a fictitious Porsche purchase or a sort of Fattah family child-care scholarship. And when the longtime Democratic congressman was convicted after a nine-year investigation, a monthlong trial, and three days of jury deliberations, it was as the captain of a criminal organization.
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Jonathan Tamari, and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
A veritable who's who of Pennsylvania politics could end up taking the stand when U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah goes on trial next year on federal racketeering conspiracy charges. A list of possible government witnesses filed with the court Tuesday contains such boldface names as U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey (D., Pa.), former Gov. Ed Rendell, and State Sen. Vincent Hughes (D., Phila.). Also mentioned are behind-the-scenes political players, including Greg Harvey, a veteran Philadelphia election lawyer, and William Sasso, a prominent GOP donor, a confidant of former Gov. Tom Corbett, and chairman of the law firm Stradley Ronon.
NEWS
October 27, 1998
U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's energy and attention to detail have enabled him to get good things done, even as a minority party member of a particularly partisan Congress. The Philadelphia Democrat's $140 million High Hopes/21st Century Scholarship plan became law earlier this month. The program seeks to motivate disadvantaged sixth graders to stay in school through mentoring, tutoring and a promise of federal aid for college to students who persevere in learning. Urging children as young as 12 to think about higher education - and helping them get ready for it - helps counter the feeling that poor children aren't "college material.
NEWS
October 16, 2006
Penna. Second District This is solidly Democratic turf covering West and Northwest Philadelphia and reaching into Montgomery County's Cheltenham Township. The mostly urban district includes pockets of poverty, but primarily middle-income voters. The Case for Fattah Democrat Age 49 Philadelphia U.S. Representative Over nearly a dozen years in Congress, Chaka Fattah, 49, has developed a laser focus on initiatives that boost the higher-education prospects of urban teens.
NEWS
March 1, 2006
With all of his political clout, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah should be well-positioned to abide voluntarily by Philadelphia's new campaign-contribution limits. This would be the year to do it, as civic leaders are mounting an all-out effort to change the city's pay-to-play political culture. All the right elements are there for Fattah: high profile, strong political base, 25 years a public-policy wonk and lawmaker, married to a local TV news anchor. Yet the veteran Democratic lawmaker is among several would-be mayoral candidates dancing around the limits by delaying a formal campaign announcement.
NEWS
November 7, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE VOTERS may still believe in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, but another member of his inner circle has bailed from the net closing in around him. Now Tom Lindenfeld, a Washington, D.C., political consultant, may help investigators land Fattah in an ongoing public-corruption probe. One day after Fattah collected 87 percent of the vote to win his 11th term in the 2nd District, Lindenfeld, 59, pleaded guilty to wire fraud in U.S. District Court in connection with an illegal $1 million loan he funneled into Fattah's failed 2007 mayoral bid. As part of the plea deal, Lindenfeld agreed to cooperate in the investigation linked to Fattah - who has not been charged - and to testify at trial if necessary.
NEWS
August 14, 2015
U.S. REP. CHAKA Fattah , indicted two weeks ago for racketeering, bribery and a whole bunch of other things that members of Congress probably aren't supposed to do, may already have a Democratic challenger in the 2016 primary. Some political observers - yeah, we're looking at you , Philly Mag - have speculated that it's unlikely that a serious Democrat would challenge Fattah if he refuses to step down, which currently is his plan. Maybe they are right. Party leaders - Ed Rendell , Mayor Nutter , Bob Brady , even Nancy Pelosi - have all expressed plenty of sadness that this whole ordeal is happening to Fattah, but not much concern about the corruption allegations contained in the 29-count indictment.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
A federal courtroom packed with supporters of political consultant Gregory Naylor erupted in cheers Tuesday as he was sentenced to probation for his role in the corruption case of former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. Naylor could have been sent to prison for more than three years after pleading guilty in August 2014 to concealing the misuse of $622,000 in campaign contributions and federal grant funds, and lying about it to the FBI. Prosecutors, while saying his cooperation with them and testimony against Fattah was pivotal, still wanted him to serve some prison time.
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NEWS
August 26, 2016
THERE IS NO good reason for an elected official to create a nonprofit organization. We have said this before - and this week's Inquirer report that a federal probe into District Attorney Seth Williams' finances have extended to a nonprofit he created, prompts us to say it again: The practice of politicians starting nonprofits must stop. We don't know what the probe of Williams' Second Chance Foundation entails - or whether it is related to his admission this month that he failed to report $160,000 in gifts - but we do know that the minute the words "Williams" and "nonprofit" appeared in the same sentence, we had four immediate thoughts: 1. Chaka Fattah 2. Vince Fumo 3. Mike Veon 4. Kenyatta Johnson We also thought about Tom DeLay, Rick Santorum, and, yes, Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
A federal courtroom packed with supporters of political consultant Gregory Naylor erupted in cheers Tuesday as he was sentenced to probation for his role in the corruption case of former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. Naylor could have been sent to prison for more than three years after pleading guilty in August 2014 to concealing the misuse of $622,000 in campaign contributions and federal grant funds, and lying about it to the FBI. Prosecutors, while saying his cooperation with them and testimony against Fattah was pivotal, still wanted him to serve some prison time.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
A very smart guy who has worked in Philadelphia politics since I was in short pants once explained how ethical lines get crossed in this city. Politicians don't typically walk up to the line, give it a long look, and then step over, he told me. What really happens is they stop and look back, see the line in their distant tracks, and then realize they crossed it without much thought at all. If Chaka Fattah is looking back these days, he's...
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
It was clear throughout the trial that Chaka Fattah never thought it would happen - never thought it could happen - that he would really lose it all. Through four weeks of damning testimony, the 11-term congressman who had so long dominated the stratosphere of Philly politics came across as all cool confidence and smiles. He smiled after prosecutors explained how he orchestrated an illegal $1 million loan for his floundering 2007 mayoral campaign and then paid it back with stolen money.
NEWS
June 25, 2016
ISSUE | POLITICAL CORRUPTION Cronies backed Fattah even after verdict Almost as unsurprising as the conviction of U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) on all 22 counts of fraud, money-laundering, and bribery was the reaction of the political clerisy ("Reaction: Heavy hearts, calls to quit," Wednesday). Not one of Fattah's Democratic colleagues called for his resignation; that reasonable response to the jury's verdict was left to Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a group that, as confirmed by the Inquirer's "Philadelphia Political Hall of Shame," should never be confused with the capos who run Philadelphia's Democratic Party.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Jonathan Tamari, and Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITERS
Chaka Fattah resigned his U.S. House seat effective immediately Thursday, a day after Republican leaders balked at his plan to remain in Congress for three months following his conviction on federal corruption charges. In a letter to Speaker Paul Ryan, the Philadelphia Democrat wrote that he had hoped to resign Oct. 3 - a day before his sentencing - to ensure an orderly transition. "However, out of respect for the entire House leadership, and so as not to cause a distraction from the House's work for the people, I have changed my effective date," the letter said.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
The crimes Chaka Fattah was found guilty of Tuesday won't be mistaken for small-time. Money stolen to pay off illicit political debt was laundered through charities and companies. A network of aides and associates handled the details. Bribes were masked as a fictitious Porsche purchase or a sort of Fattah family child-care scholarship. And when the longtime Democratic congressman was convicted after a nine-year investigation, a monthlong trial, and three days of jury deliberations, it was as the captain of a criminal organization.
NEWS
May 31, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
Chaka Fattah wanted context. And he didn't care if the people he represents in the Second Congressional District had to wait until after his primary election and during his federal trial to get it. The 11-term congressman, who in February said he was "ramping up" his use of federal money to advertise his office as his reelection campaign fund-raising faltered, declined to tell me how much he was spending until U.S. House rules required it. ...
NEWS
May 20, 2016
COUNCILMAN DAVID OH had a "re-election victory" celebration this month at 1925, the Center City lounge and bottle-service club. The celebration - six months after he was re-elected last fall - doubled as a "retire-the-debt" fund-raiser with recommended contribution levels of $100, $250, $500, $1,000. Top-shelf open bar included. Our invitation must've gotten lost in the mail, but guess who showed up with a fat check? Soda mogul Harold Honickman. The timing of Oh's soiree couldn't have been better for the soda industry, with City Council currently debating Mayor Kenney's proposed 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-drinks tax. Campaign cash is like a bottle of shaken-up soda: It goes everywhere.
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