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Challah

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FOOD
September 11, 1996 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, For the Daily News
For Rosh Hashanah this Friday night, Jews of Ashkenazic descent, whose roots are primarily in Eastern Europe, will probably have gefilte fish and matzoh ball soup on their tables. Members of a second branch of Judaism, the Sephardic Jews, whose ancestors were expelled from Spain to the Middle East and elsewhere during the Inquisition, are more likely to serve jellied striped bass and autumn vegetable soup. The two groups' culinary traditions have about as much in common as, say, Italian and Mexican "Christian" food.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sky was still dark Wednesday when the faithful started to arrive at Roling's Bakery in Elkins Park. Some carried crumpled lists, moist from the morning mist, others had memorized their marching orders. "Five raisin and five plain," Deb Goldberg said in a breathy rush. "Every year I come from Center City. It's an annual ritual. " She refers to the ritual buying of the holiday challah. This shop is so small (three's a crowd) that the Roling family sets up a tent in its minuscule parking lot off Montgomery Avenue to sell round loaves of challah for the Jewish High Holy Days.
NEWS
September 29, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sky was still dark Wednesday when the faithful started to arrive at Roling's Bakery in Elkins Park. Some carried crumpled lists, moist from the morning mist; others had memorized their marching orders. "Five raisin and five plain," Deb Goldberg said in a breathy rush. "Every year I come from Center City. It's an annual ritual. " She refers to the ritual buying of the holiday challah. This shop is so small (three's a crowd) that the Roling family sets up a tent in its minuscule parking lot off Montgomery Avenue to sell round loaves of challah for the Jewish High Holy Days.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
As Rosalie Alexander showed two freshly baked loaves of challah to the group of fledgling bakers, a debate arose over whether one should break the traditional Jewish bread or cut it with a knife. "A knife is a weapon of war," Alexander told the nine women who had gathered Tuesday night in the basement kitchen of the Kaiserman Branch of the Jewish Community Center in Lower Merion. "Some Jews believe that it should not be introduced on the Sabbath. " The women, young and old, had come to the JCC to learn to make challah, a braided bread traditionally eaten by Jews on the Sabbath.
FOOD
December 26, 2001 | By RACHEL ROGALA For the Daily News
At Zeke's Fifth Street Deli in Society Hill, owners Paul Cohen and Mark Krause offer a Monte Cristo sandwich with a twist. Zeke's version of this popular sandwich spins in the restaurant's Jewish-deli style by using challah French toast with turkey, ham and Swiss cheese. Of course, a Monte Cristo is not a Monte Cristo unless it is served with a side of maple syrup. Mark says this sandwich is for when "someone likes something different. " With its sweet and savory combinations, surely, this sandwich is fit for a king - or at least a count.
FOOD
April 12, 2013 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Like so many Yiddish words, schmaltz has mixed connotations - it can be used to describe something fine and expensive or something corny and over-the-top sentimental. But for many cooks, its true meaning lies on the palate. "If you don't use schmaltz, your food will be flavorless," says Russ Farer, general manager at Schlesinger's Deli in Center City. "It's that simple. " Schmaltz, of course, is the rendered fat of chicken (or goose) that European Jews adopted for kosher cookery in place of butter when tallow from beef proved prohibitively expensive.
FOOD
April 11, 2013
Makes 4 cups of chicken salad or 6 sandwiches For the chicken salad: 1 whole chicken, approximately    3   pounds Diamond Crystal kosher salt 4 scallions, finely chopped 3 stalks celery, finely    chopped 1 cup mayonnaise Freshly ground black pepper For the sandwich: Schmaltz 12 slices challah Gribenes Cucumber pickles Pickled cherry peppers 1. Make the chicken salad:...
FOOD
November 26, 2009
Makes 10 one-cup servings 1. Wash all vegetables and set aside. Mix challah breadcrumbs with olive oil, salt and pepper and set aside. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Butter the bottom and sides of a deep 8-by-12-inch rectangular baking dish. 2. Slice all vegetables in 1/8-inch thick rounds. Layer the sweet potatoes in a slightly overlapping arrangement on the bottom of the dish. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and 1/4 of the cheese. Repeat this layering process with the rutabagas, butternut squash, and turnips.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Needlework begins its new year of programs on Wednesday at the Jewish Community Center of Southern New Jersey, 2395 West Marlton Pike, Cherry Hill. The organization includes chapters in Canada, Israel and South Africa, said Fradele Feld, publicity chairwoman for the group. Overall, there are about 600 to 700 members, including about 30 people from New Jersey, Philadelphia and suburban Pennsylvania who make up the Delaware Valley Chapter. The local guild was founded about 12 years ago by a group of women in New York, Feld said.
NEWS
September 24, 2002
By Sidney B. Kurtz On the fourth Friday of each month, about 1:15 p.m., you can see her entering the front door of the Kresson View Center, a nursing home in Voorhees, to get ready for Shabbus (Sabbath) services. A couple of tables have been pushed together and chairs placed around them in the dining room or in the conference room, whichever is available. Hilda Isaacson, with the blessing of the Jewish Family Service and with her trademark silvery-white hair neatly coiffed, spreads out white tablecloths and sets out two candelabras, a bottle of grape juice, printouts of Hebrew prayers with transliteration for those not familiar with the age-old language, and a fresh, twist challah - the traditional bread eaten on the Sabbath.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
MARGATE, N.J. - Lobster, challah, hollah! Ten things I learned at the Margate Community Farmers Market: 1. There's lobster in those waters off Atlantic City. Not only are people freaking out over the Caribbean-blue waters at the Jersey Shore this summer (due to drought conditions resulting in less storm water runoff plus a whole lot of phytoplankton), but there are lobsters! In fact, fisherman Patrick Irwin, 42, says he catches the lobsters that many people are eating in New York City and Philadelphia restaurants 12 miles off Atlantic City's Delta Basin on Maryland Avenue.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
"Typically, we braid the challah," Debbie Friedner says. "We separate the strands and wind them like this. " The career counselor, 60, expertly twists the glistening dough on her Cherry Hill dining-room table as family members look on. "I'm going to let it rise a second time. Then I'll put it in the oven and let it bake," Friedner continues. "And when it's done, I'm going to [brush] it with a bit of egg wash and sprinkle poppy seeds and sesame seeds on top. " If all that sounds rather wonderful, imagine 100 or more Jewish women like Friedner baking challah together for the Sabbath ( Shabbos or Shabbat , in Yiddish and Hebrew, respectively)
FOOD
April 12, 2013 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Like so many Yiddish words, schmaltz has mixed connotations - it can be used to describe something fine and expensive or something corny and over-the-top sentimental. But for many cooks, its true meaning lies on the palate. "If you don't use schmaltz, your food will be flavorless," says Russ Farer, general manager at Schlesinger's Deli in Center City. "It's that simple. " Schmaltz, of course, is the rendered fat of chicken (or goose) that European Jews adopted for kosher cookery in place of butter when tallow from beef proved prohibitively expensive.
FOOD
April 11, 2013
Makes 4 cups of chicken salad or 6 sandwiches For the chicken salad: 1 whole chicken, approximately    3   pounds Diamond Crystal kosher salt 4 scallions, finely chopped 3 stalks celery, finely    chopped 1 cup mayonnaise Freshly ground black pepper For the sandwich: Schmaltz 12 slices challah Gribenes Cucumber pickles Pickled cherry peppers 1. Make the chicken salad:...
FOOD
September 13, 2012 | By Jim Romanoff, Associated Press
Laura Frankel thinks about Rosh Hashanah in simple terms: "A time for Mom to shine. " That's because the Jewish new year, which is the first high holy day to occur each autumn, usually isn't celebrated with the sort of big gathering you might have for a Passover seder, but rather a smaller, more contemplative meal with close family, says Frankel, the chef at Spertus, a Jewish culture center in Chicago. And though there are some traditional symbolic foods included - such as a big round challah loaf to represent the continuing cycle of life, and apples dipped in honey to start off the new year on a sweet note - Frankel says the meal most often is built around one of mom's comfort meals, such as a brisket or roast chicken.
FOOD
September 29, 2011 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Every cuisine exists as part of a story. One part of the story told by Jewish foods is of migration, assimilation, and now-vanished worlds. Eastern Europe, Spain, Russia, Yemen, Greece, Iran, Egypt, Syria, Tunisia, and Bukhara in what is now Uzbekistan were all once home to large and vibrant Jewish communities. As these old communities were forced to disband and regroup in the diaspora, the foods of their past became an important link in their new lines. So the story of modern Jewish food is one of a dynamic, multicultural cuisine.
NEWS
September 29, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sky was still dark Wednesday when the faithful started to arrive at Roling's Bakery in Elkins Park. Some carried crumpled lists, moist from the morning mist; others had memorized their marching orders. "Five raisin and five plain," Deb Goldberg said in a breathy rush. "Every year I come from Center City. It's an annual ritual. " She refers to the ritual buying of the holiday challah. This shop is so small (three's a crowd) that the Roling family sets up a tent in its minuscule parking lot off Montgomery Avenue to sell round loaves of challah for the Jewish High Holy Days.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sky was still dark Wednesday when the faithful started to arrive at Roling's Bakery in Elkins Park. Some carried crumpled lists, moist from the morning mist, others had memorized their marching orders. "Five raisin and five plain," Deb Goldberg said in a breathy rush. "Every year I come from Center City. It's an annual ritual. " She refers to the ritual buying of the holiday challah. This shop is so small (three's a crowd) that the Roling family sets up a tent in its minuscule parking lot off Montgomery Avenue to sell round loaves of challah for the Jewish High Holy Days.
FOOD
November 26, 2009
Makes 10 one-cup servings 1. Wash all vegetables and set aside. Mix challah breadcrumbs with olive oil, salt and pepper and set aside. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Butter the bottom and sides of a deep 8-by-12-inch rectangular baking dish. 2. Slice all vegetables in 1/8-inch thick rounds. Layer the sweet potatoes in a slightly overlapping arrangement on the bottom of the dish. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and 1/4 of the cheese. Repeat this layering process with the rutabagas, butternut squash, and turnips.
NEWS
September 9, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
In the light of day, on a cafe table at the edge of Rittenhouse Square, the challah roll strikes a pose, clasping in its jaws the 13-ounce Rougeburger, one of the town's undisputed jefes . And over at the Grill off the rotunda of the Ritz-Carlton, a longer golden roll enfolds the luxe lobster salad, garnished with shaved radish, tomato and pea tendrils. And here and there - perhaps at Ansill or Marigold or Snackbar or other trendy rooms, or the occasional country club, or catered affair or, on Sunday mornings, the farm market at Head House Square - a cheese plate is finished with tiles of sour-cream crackers, baskets bulge with black-olive flatbreads, or an exotic, soy-seasoned, peanut-crusted focaccia may make a memorable debut.
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