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Challenges

NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTER Over the last 15 years, Chester Community Charter School has grown so rapidly that it educates more students - about 3,000 - than the cash-strapped traditional classrooms in the surrounding Chester Upland School District. But a group of residents troubled by the charter's rapid growth are questioning whether the privately managed, taxpayer-funded school, which runs from kindergarten through eighth grade, has the legal authority to teach children beyond fourth grade. The seeds of the dispute emerged in August, when the state auditor general reported that there was no evidence that Chester Community's original charter had been updated since being authorized in 1998 for grades K-4. The school and the district dispute the assertion.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
CALLING THE "growth of the reviving neighborhoods" of Spring Garden and Center City "incompatible with the culture of a nearby casino," three institutions yesterday came out against Bart Blatstein's Tower Investments casino project at Broad and Callowhill streets. Congregation Rodeph Shalom and the Mathematics, Civics and Sciences Charter School, both on Broad Street, and Friends Select School, three blocks away, filed the formal "Petition to Intervene" with the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board, said lawyer Larry Spector.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Avenging the Ancestors Coalition, an activist group that played a shaping role in the decade-long effort to commemorate the President's House on Independence Mall, has now turned its attention to the recently rediscovered Mother Bethel Burial Ground at Queen and Lawrence Streets. In a widely circulated e-mail this week, the group noted that it has formed a committee - NOT Over Our Dead Bodies! - and called for citizens to join in protecting ancestral and historical memory. Mother Bethel Church, at Sixth and Lombard Streets, will convene a public meeting Sunday from 3 to 5 p.m. to discuss plans for commemoration, and the Avenging the Ancestors Coalition (ATAC)
SPORTS
December 6, 2013 | By Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Staff Writer
Another week, another mega challenge for the Eagles defense. After doing a decent job on Larry Fitzgerald last week, the gas gets turned up a bit with the arrival of Calvin Johnson and the Lions on Sunday. Though the Birds have been better lately, no team in football has allowed more receptions to opposing wide receivers than the Eagles (204). Ditto for most yards (2,599) and most touchdowns (18). Detroit's receivers and tight ends are strong, long and wrong for a secondary lacking confidence.
SPORTS
November 27, 2013 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Staff Writer
WITH THE exception of the Chiefs back in Week 3, the Eagles really haven't gone up against a top-shelf defense this season. That isn't meant to disparage the impressive performances of LeSean McCoy, who leads the league in rushing, or Nick Foles, who leads the league in passing, or DeSean Jackson and Riley Cooper, who have combined for 14 touchdown catches and are averaging a collective 17.7 yards per catch. It's just a fact. The Chiefs are the only team they've faced that currently is ranked higher than 14th in the league in points allowed (they're tied for second)
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The blocks of Market and Chestnut east of City Hall remain the gash and gaping hole in Center City's success. They are bleak pockets of squalor and neglect. Landlords in the Market East neighborhood - if you can call it a neighborhood - have sat speculatively on properties for decades, avoiding upkeep or improvement. These are the blocks that progress forgot, a costly, damaged, and troubling stretch of our city that inhibits not only tourism but investment, jobs, and revenue. Francis Strawbridge, the final chairman of Strawbridge & Clothier, told me "Market's on a down cycle.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
By most calculations, Toni Pergolin was completely nuts. Why would she leave a secure - and lucrative - job as a chief financial officer at Pennsylvania Hospital to move to a storied nonprofit in Haddonfield that was barely afloat? Then, in August 2004, when she got there, it was even worse. More than 1,500 autistic, developmentally delayed, brain-injured clients, some of whom had lived in Bancroft Neurohealth group homes for most of their lives, were counting on her for a miracle.
SPORTS
November 24, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
LAST TIME OUT, Villanova was able to jump all over Towson because it played some suffocating defense. Last night at the Pavilion, on the 50th anniversary of another generation's 9/11 moment, maybe not so much. It makes a difference. Then again, Delaware has the kind of perimeter guys who can somewhat offset the Wildcats' biggest strength. And the Blue Hens were averaging 85 points a game. So maybe it shouldn't have been all that surprising that with 3 minutes left, the visitors - who'd trailed by nine a little less than 3 minutes earlier - pulled even on yet another three-pointer, this time from straightaway by Davon Usher.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
MAYS LANDING, N.J. Atlantic City Republican mayoral challenger Don Guardian claimed victory - again - Tuesday night after a count of mail-in votes gave him a seemingly insurmountable lead over Democratic incumbent Lorenzo Langford. Guardian's victory speech this time was over a cellphone on speaker to a group of reporters outside the old Atlantic County courthouse, where the Board of Elections counted additional mail-in ballots that increased his lead to 433 votes. "I believe I have sufficient additional votes that would indicate that I am indeed the [mayor-]
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Saoirse Ronan does a lot of sneering and sour-faced grimacing at the beginning of How I Live Now . Her character, Daisy, is a 16-year-old New Yorker with dyed blond hair, a nose stud, a surly attitude. The last place she wants to be is where she is: at Heathrow airport, about to be driven to the middle of nowhere in the English countryside, where her father has dispatched her for the summer - to live with an aunt and three cousins she doesn't know. There are goats and dogs on the farm.
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