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NEWS
July 8, 2011
For garden-lovers in the Philadelphia area - anywhere, really - there's a new book in town. Published by the University of Pennsylvania Press ($19.77 on Amazon.com), it's called Chanticleer: A Pleasure Garden , by Adrian Higgins with photos by Rob Cardillo. Higgins is the Washington Post's garden editor. Cardillo, who lives in Ambler, is a well-known garden photographer of the first order. In fact, his photographs - almost 100, culled from 4,000 taken over two growing seasons - often threaten to overshadow the prose, only because they're so extraordinary.
NEWS
February 19, 1990 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
It was only its second Delaware Valley appearance, but the justly acclaimed San Francisco vocal ensemble Chanticleer has become so well known that a packed house was on hand to offer enthusiastic greetings when the group performed Friday night in Roberts Hall at Haverford College. Billing itself as the only full-time professional a cappella vocal ensemble in the United States, Chanticleer is the only American chorus able to compete on equal terms with the great (and very old) choirs of Europe in the performance of the Renaissance choral masterworks.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Cherry Hill officials and a local developer have worked out an agreement to solve some nagging problems at a section of the Chanticleer development. For months, some residents of the Mews section of the community have complained about cracking pavement and unfinished landscaping around their town houses. At the same time, developer John Canuso of Voorhees, who built the Mews section, has argued that most of the work is complete and asked the township to release his performance bonds.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
When residents of the Chanticleer condominium development in Cherry Hill complained to New Jersey American Water Co. officials in June that their water pressure was dangerously low and could not provide adequate fire protection, their complaints received prompt attention - too much, they say now. New Jersey American representatives Arthur Sherman and Bob Fonash agreed at that time to take steps to increase the water pressure in Chanticleer, a...
LIVING
April 1, 2005 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Exactly four years ago today, Beth Kephart went to Chanticleer for the first time, in need of a place to wander and think about her future. Although she lived just 10 minutes away, she had never taken a detour into the 35-acre pleasure garden in Wayne, with its colorful flowers, tropical terraces, and extravagant ponds. But there she was on her 41st birthday - wife, mother, well-regarded author whose first book, A Slant of Sun: One Child's Courage, was a 1998 National Book Award finalist - feeling at a crossroads, trying to figure out what was next.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Across the south of England, in the counties of Kent and Surrey and Sussex, there are large estates and small, historic country homes where the public can roam and admire and learn and, implicitly, help preserve a tradition. And what they see is a form of art - the art of making gardens into something like constantly changing three-dimensional paintings. On the Main Line, a 30-acre estate first opened to the public this month, with the intention of doing just that. And more.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Beth Kephart
One hundred million years ago, according to Loren Eiseley, the great anthropologist and Penn professor, the world was monochrome green. No dahlia, no foxglove, no halo-headed hydrangea, no speckled lily. Continent by continent, flowerless-ness reigned. Dinosaurs dreamed in forest hues. And then, Eiseley writes in How Flowers Changed the World, "just a short time before the close of the Age of Reptiles, there occurred a soundless, violent explosion. " The explosion was of color and fruit, pistils and stamen.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Adolph G. Rosengarten Jr. is best remembered as a Main Line gentleman who helped create Chanticleer, an arboretum on his family estate in Wayne. Yet Rosengarten also was a decorated soldier who was involved in one of the most significant espionage developments of World War II. "I had intended to be known as a good landscape gardener, not a spy," Rosengarten wrote in 1974 after his involvement in the Allies' intelligence work became public knowledge. In early 1941, Rosengarten, then 35, went on active military duty and ended up with a coastal artillery unit, which was disbanded in 1943.
LIVING
October 10, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At age 7, Jonathan Wright was thrilled with his unconventional birthday presents: a huge rhododendron bush in full bloom and a shovel to plant it with. It should come as no surprise, then, that at age 29 he's a rising star in the world of public horticulture. As the youngest of seven full-time gardeners at Chanticleer, the nationally acclaimed "pleasure garden" in Wayne, Wright already has a job a lot of his peers, of any age, would kill for. "It's amazing," Wright says. "I'm so lucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The garden's "off-season" used to be a time to rest and daydream about next year's triumphs, but for professional gardeners and many an amateur, that's the fantasy now. "The off-season used to be a nice time to decompress, but I'm actually busier then. It's more restful to go out and weed," says Joe Henderson, one of six full-time horticulturists at Chanticleer, the public garden in Wayne, who are expected to take on a creative project every winter. This keeps everyone "focused and busy," to put it mildly, and allows for "time to dream about future designs," according to Chanticleer's executive director R. William Thomas.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Weaver, 76, of Meadowbrook, a chemical engineer, died Wednesday, Dec. 11, of bile duct cancer at Holy Redeemer Hospital's hospice. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Mr. Weaver graduated from Central High School, and from Cornell University in 1959 with a degree in chemical engineering. He spent most of his career with Rohm & Haas Co., starting in research in 1969 and retiring in 1990 as vice president for environmental, health and safety, and engineering. After that, he worked for eight years in the New York office of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Kale in the serpentine" sounds like the title of a whodunit, but there's no mystery here - just something new and fun that awaits visitors to Chanticleer, the public garden in Wayne that likes to change things up every year. Other Philadelphia-area gardens have added stuff this spring, too, from new tree houses and replenished rose gardens to "steps-free" walkways and giant bug sculptures. But "kale in the serpentine" definitely stands out. First, the serpentine. It's a hillside garden planted every spring with snaking swaths of cool and colorful crops like wheat, tobacco, barley, cotton, flax, sunflowers, or sorghum.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The garden's "off-season" used to be a time to rest and daydream about next year's triumphs, but for professional gardeners and many an amateur, that's the fantasy now. "The off-season used to be a nice time to decompress, but I'm actually busier then. It's more restful to go out and weed," says Joe Henderson, one of six full-time horticulturists at Chanticleer, the public garden in Wayne, who are expected to take on a creative project every winter. This keeps everyone "focused and busy," to put it mildly, and allows for "time to dream about future designs," according to Chanticleer's executive director R. William Thomas.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Beth Kephart
One hundred million years ago, according to Loren Eiseley, the great anthropologist and Penn professor, the world was monochrome green. No dahlia, no foxglove, no halo-headed hydrangea, no speckled lily. Continent by continent, flowerless-ness reigned. Dinosaurs dreamed in forest hues. And then, Eiseley writes in How Flowers Changed the World, "just a short time before the close of the Age of Reptiles, there occurred a soundless, violent explosion. " The explosion was of color and fruit, pistils and stamen.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curious about what some of the public gardens and arboretums in the Philadelphia region are planning for 2012? Here's a preview: Awbury Arboretum in Germantown has a new community apiary - three hives outside and a demonstration hive inside the Francis Cope House. A 10-session beekeeping course is under way and a 4-H beekeeping club is planned, as are honey sales. Beekeeper Anaiis Salles suggested the apiary because "Awbury has underutilized green space, plenty of room for hives, it's easy to get to, and has a really nontoxic environment.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
For garden-lovers in the Philadelphia area - anywhere, really - there's a new book in town. Published by the University of Pennsylvania Press ($19.77 on Amazon.com), it's called Chanticleer: A Pleasure Garden , by Adrian Higgins with photos by Rob Cardillo. Higgins is the Washington Post's garden editor. Cardillo, who lives in Ambler, is a well-known garden photographer of the first order. In fact, his photographs - almost 100, culled from 4,000 taken over two growing seasons - often threaten to overshadow the prose, only because they're so extraordinary.
NEWS
April 18, 2009
Sheryl Graham Monkemeyer, 46, of Newtown Square, a nurse, died of Huntington's disease, an incurable neurodegenerative disorder, April 6 at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mrs. Monkemeyer grew up in Newtown Square. While attending Marple Newtown High School, she volunteered with the Newtown Square Ambulance Service and at Bryn Mawr Hospital. After earning a bachelor's degree in nursing from Villanova University, she was a nurse at Dunwoody Village in Newtown Square, Manor Care in Yeadon, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby, and Cooper Hospital in Camden.
LIVING
March 20, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flowers go in one bed, vegetables in another. That's how many of us learned to garden. But there's another way, one that combines edible and ornamental, functional and beautiful, in a riotous mix of peas and tomatoes, blueberries and strawberries, with sunflowers and sage tossed in. Scholars call this garden a potager, from the French potage, meaning soup. It's also known as a combination garden or, more popular, a kitchen garden. Rooted in the Middle Ages, this all-in-one approach enjoyed Renaissance renown at the grand French chateaux and now resonates through our own era of gloom and recession.
LIVING
October 10, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At age 7, Jonathan Wright was thrilled with his unconventional birthday presents: a huge rhododendron bush in full bloom and a shovel to plant it with. It should come as no surprise, then, that at age 29 he's a rising star in the world of public horticulture. As the youngest of seven full-time gardeners at Chanticleer, the nationally acclaimed "pleasure garden" in Wayne, Wright already has a job a lot of his peers, of any age, would kill for. "It's amazing," Wright says. "I'm so lucky.
NEWS
January 28, 2007 | By Nancy A. Goldenberg
Many of us make New Year's resolutions, most of which are quickly broken. But this year, I made one that's easy to keep, the perfect antidote to the onslaught of negative news or the super-heated rhetoric of the mayoral campaign. At least once a month, I'm going to visit a local attraction I've never been to before. Like the New Yorker who's never been to the top of the Empire State Building, many of us must meekly admit to never having been to some of the Philadelphia area's well-known cultural attractions.
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