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LIVING
December 9, 1994 | By Cheryl Lynne Potter, FOR THE INQUIRER
The main ingredient of artist Osman Karriem Hayes' art form is so exotic it can be found right there on the grocery-store shelf, in between such household items as plastic wrap, sandwich bags, and other paper products. And to most people, the thin, shiny sheets that are Hayes' principal medium are no secret ingredient at all: They're just plain old aluminum foil. It doesn't matter what name is on the foil package wrapper. Hayes, who calls himself a "tinfoil artist," is able to manipulate the silvery, pliable material into whatever character his fertile imagination suggests.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Kristeen Fabrizio hobbled into the cafeteria at the Phoenixville Area Junior High School, her legs bound in a narrow, ankle-length elastic tube. "I swim. I fell in love," said Fabrizio, 10, of Phoenixville, when she took her turn on stage Tuesday morning. "Who am I?" Dozens of second, third and fourth graders waved their hands, eager to guess whom Fabrizio was portraying in the Barkley Elementary School's Character Costume Cavalcade. The cavalcade was part of the monthlong "Kids Who Read Succeed Program" coordinated by librarian Lois Boyer and elementary school principal Joseph C. Dougherty.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Michael Smerconish
Steve Solms died last week. I knew him only peripherally, but always got a kick out of his joie de vivre. Others have reminisced about the time the real estate developer and diehard 76ers fan brazenly walked onto the court during player introductions and presented Julius Erving with a doctor's bag. I'll always remember seeing Solms in the midst of a real estate crash, but looking no worse for the wear at poolside in Las Vegas and flashing a wad of...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The Internet comic strip Get Your War On by David Rees has been commenting on the war on terrorism by showing people in offices talking to one another on the phone or over coffee and doughnuts about the state of the world. The Rude Mechanicals of Austin, Texas, have adapted the comic strip (www.getyourwaron.com) for the stage, using overhead projectors and five actors in suits, ties and high heels. They provide an illustrated, damning chronicle of the Bush administration, starting in 2001 and tracing the war on terrorism through Afghanistan and Iraq, with excursions into the anthrax scares, Enron, the Katrina catastrophe, and Terry Schiavo.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Surabhi Avasthi, New York Daily News
At the end of the day, Tracey Ullman has no trouble peeling off her many personae - and the various wigs, mustaches and thick accents that go along with each. "I don't get attached to any of them for more than half an hour," Ullman says of the gallery of quirky characters she plays on her HBO comedy series, "Tracey Takes On . . . " which kicks off its second season at 11 p.m. tomorrow. "I'm quite glad to take them all off and go back to being Tracey. " When she's not in character, the 37-year-old British comic actress wears simple, tailored clothing and no makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Brendan Behan's 1958 play The Hostage concerns a British soldier taken prisioner by the Irish Republican Army in retaliation for the planned execution of an IRA member. That's the plot, but it certainly isn't the play. In fact, Behan spends probably less than half of this three-hour piece dealing with the plot. The rest of the time is spent on the frequently crazy doings of a passel of minor characters and in the performance of a large number of mostly humorous songs. The Hostage, which Temple University Theaters is producing, is a strange theatrical bird.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010
By Glenn Taylor Ecco Press. 360 pp. $24.99 Reviewed by Sherrie Flick Many of us like television shows, even the predictable programs in which the characters consistently react the way you expect. In these shows, the ending isn't so much a revelation as a logical conclusion. It can be comforting to watch these shows and not have to think much. On the other hand, I try to read a lot. Reading makes me happy to be alive, and some days when it's hot and humid and oil is spilling into the Gulf of Mexico, I need something to revive my faith in humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - Is any play more perfectly titled than Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance? The Pulitzer Prize-winning 1966 play, now at the McCarter Theatre through Feb. 27, has well-coiffed suburbanites balancing their composure against chaotic forces within themselves and outside the door. Other balances are needed for a successful rendering of this play. As much as one wishes more of them were achieved in this Emily Mann-directed production, there's still plenty happening with such a rich script wrestled into life by high-caliber actors Kathleen Chalfant and John Glover.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
Anthony Quinn is chuckling. It's a deep, warm chuckle that rumbles up from the kettle drum of mirth in the potbelly he has borrowed from Zorba the Greek. Anthony Quinn is chuckling about someone's notion that the billing of his play (opening officially tonight at the Forrest Theater) should read "Zorba is Anthony Quinn" rather than "Anthony Quinn is Zorba. " "I think it's lovely, but I think it's nonsense, but they said the same thing when I played Gauguin . . . 'Requiem for a Heavyweight.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A door at the back of the darkened stage swings ajar to disgorge a man in a black jacket, who edges into a spotlit square and begins telling you a story. It is a story of life's randomness, something about an auto accident. Soon he is joined by a second man, who also appears involved in the story; it is, in fact, somehow his story. And In on It, a production at the Arden Theatre by Daniel MacIvor's Canadian company da da kamera, is off and running. As it initially unfolds, the story is about Ray, whose wife leaves him for a friend of theirs just as Ray is diagnosed with a fatal disease.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
John Patrick Shanley's Outside Mullingar is a lovable play about love. The Philadelphia Theatre Company production is lovable, too - full of quirky charm and tasty dialogue and, well, lovable characters. The cast is superb; they create rich accents and meticulously craft personalities. Shanley, best known for his New York voice in both the tough-minded play Doubt and the romantic screenplay for Moonstruck , here returns to his Irish roots. Outside Mullingar is set on two farms in rural Ireland, and although we're told the events begin in December 2008 and continue to 2013, it feels long ago and far away.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Rapture, Blister, Burn may go down in history as the first feminist play to end with brainy female characters toasting Phyllis Schlafly, that bête noire of the Equal Rights Amendment, without sarcasm. It's no gimmick. Gina Gionfriddo's intellectually ambitious comedy, reopening the question of women choosing between career and family, allows that all choices are valid, even mediocre ones. A bit dour, perhaps? No. Rapture , which opened Wednesday at the Wilma Theater, is part of a growing genre that might be called war-of-the-brain-cells plays, such as Yasmina Reza's 2008 God of Carnage , with intelligent urbanites talking, drinking, and destroying each other's pretensions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There's a strange sort of bookending between Philadelphia Theatre Company's 40th-season opener, Lisa D'Amour's Detroit , and last season's production of Christopher Durang's Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike . Where Durang's characters examined contemporary America through the eyes of an elder generation filled with nostalgia and disdain for today's careless youth, D'Amour brings us up to date, in real time, with the American Dream's death...
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT - Taney Dragons player Joe Richardson Jr. said there's one ritual he will perform before stepping onto the field for the team's first game in the Little League World Series today: He must eat a bag of Skittles. "I didn't know that was a ritual," his father, Joe Richardson Sr., of Francisville, said. "I just thought he wanted to eat candy. " As the first of the Taney Dragons players' families arrived at the Little League World Series complex in South Williamsport yesterday, they gathered around the batting cages and got their first look at their children in days.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"INTO THE STORM" is a "Sharknado" movie with a troubling lack of sharks. But there is a whale of sorts - an EF5 (big) tornado pursued o'er the amber waves by the Ahabian storm chaser (Matt Walsh), whose obsessive zeal to find and film a gigantic tornado endangers his overworked and fearful crew. They track a super cell to a town in Oklahoma where a high school principal (right-sized Richard Armitage, from the "Hobbit" movies) watches nervously as clouds approach a packed graduation service.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
    "IF YOU have a character who is smelling and tasting green onions and also has a hand on their bottom, your audience understands them better," said Diana Gabaldon , the mega-best-selling author of the Outlander series. Gabaldon was explaining why she needed to travel to Philadelphia in order to write the most recent entry in the series, Written in My Own Heart's Blood , which takes place during the Revolutionary War. If she imbues her characters with more sensory details - from bad breath to some backside-related flirting - her faraway characters become real for her readers, who have gobbled up 17 million copies of her books in print.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Flashpoint Theatre does it again: Herringbone , the second show of its summer season - following the The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington - is another knockout, with Ben Dibble giving a performance of stunning virtuosity in a musical that's strange and compelling by any standard. Everyone who attends Philadelphia theater regularly knows Dibble's range, from Shakespeare to children's shows; he sings, he dances, he acts in comedies and tragedies.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
If jurors walked away with one word lodged in their heads after the first day of defense testimony in the federal trial of five former Philadelphia Traffic Court judges, it is likely to have been impeccable. A parade of character witnesses employed that adjective over and over again Thursday to describe the reputations of the former jurists now facing mail- and wire-fraud charges. How would Judge Michael Lowry's character best be described? "Impeccable," said several of his childhood pals.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some fathers bond with their sons over a baseball game, a museum visit, a day at the zoo. Others wake up at 4 in the morning, drive from Virginia to Philadelphia, dress up in Batman, Robin, and Nightwing costumes, and become celebrities at the Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con. "It's something we do together," said Dave Huffman, 47, outfitted in full Batman costume. "We've met a lot of fun people. " Huffman drove up from Chesapeake, Va., to spend the day with his sons at the Convention Center, where 25,000 visitors were expected over four days.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In 1990, Eric Bogosian - a darling of Manhattan's performance art scene because of the brusque Talk Radio and such one-mess shows as Drinking in America - crafted the perfect, tic-filled vehicle for himself in 1990's blackly comic Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll . This set of manic soliloquies had him bouncing off walls and leaping about the stage in a tangled weave of grotesque faces and fin de siècle commentary, speaking through characters that...
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