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LIVING
December 9, 1994 | By Cheryl Lynne Potter, FOR THE INQUIRER
The main ingredient of artist Osman Karriem Hayes' art form is so exotic it can be found right there on the grocery-store shelf, in between such household items as plastic wrap, sandwich bags, and other paper products. And to most people, the thin, shiny sheets that are Hayes' principal medium are no secret ingredient at all: They're just plain old aluminum foil. It doesn't matter what name is on the foil package wrapper. Hayes, who calls himself a "tinfoil artist," is able to manipulate the silvery, pliable material into whatever character his fertile imagination suggests.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Kristeen Fabrizio hobbled into the cafeteria at the Phoenixville Area Junior High School, her legs bound in a narrow, ankle-length elastic tube. "I swim. I fell in love," said Fabrizio, 10, of Phoenixville, when she took her turn on stage Tuesday morning. "Who am I?" Dozens of second, third and fourth graders waved their hands, eager to guess whom Fabrizio was portraying in the Barkley Elementary School's Character Costume Cavalcade. The cavalcade was part of the monthlong "Kids Who Read Succeed Program" coordinated by librarian Lois Boyer and elementary school principal Joseph C. Dougherty.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Michael Smerconish
Steve Solms died last week. I knew him only peripherally, but always got a kick out of his joie de vivre. Others have reminisced about the time the real estate developer and diehard 76ers fan brazenly walked onto the court during player introductions and presented Julius Erving with a doctor's bag. I'll always remember seeing Solms in the midst of a real estate crash, but looking no worse for the wear at poolside in Las Vegas and flashing a wad of...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The Internet comic strip Get Your War On by David Rees has been commenting on the war on terrorism by showing people in offices talking to one another on the phone or over coffee and doughnuts about the state of the world. The Rude Mechanicals of Austin, Texas, have adapted the comic strip (www.getyourwaron.com) for the stage, using overhead projectors and five actors in suits, ties and high heels. They provide an illustrated, damning chronicle of the Bush administration, starting in 2001 and tracing the war on terrorism through Afghanistan and Iraq, with excursions into the anthrax scares, Enron, the Katrina catastrophe, and Terry Schiavo.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Surabhi Avasthi, New York Daily News
At the end of the day, Tracey Ullman has no trouble peeling off her many personae - and the various wigs, mustaches and thick accents that go along with each. "I don't get attached to any of them for more than half an hour," Ullman says of the gallery of quirky characters she plays on her HBO comedy series, "Tracey Takes On . . . " which kicks off its second season at 11 p.m. tomorrow. "I'm quite glad to take them all off and go back to being Tracey. " When she's not in character, the 37-year-old British comic actress wears simple, tailored clothing and no makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Brendan Behan's 1958 play The Hostage concerns a British soldier taken prisioner by the Irish Republican Army in retaliation for the planned execution of an IRA member. That's the plot, but it certainly isn't the play. In fact, Behan spends probably less than half of this three-hour piece dealing with the plot. The rest of the time is spent on the frequently crazy doings of a passel of minor characters and in the performance of a large number of mostly humorous songs. The Hostage, which Temple University Theaters is producing, is a strange theatrical bird.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010
By Glenn Taylor Ecco Press. 360 pp. $24.99 Reviewed by Sherrie Flick Many of us like television shows, even the predictable programs in which the characters consistently react the way you expect. In these shows, the ending isn't so much a revelation as a logical conclusion. It can be comforting to watch these shows and not have to think much. On the other hand, I try to read a lot. Reading makes me happy to be alive, and some days when it's hot and humid and oil is spilling into the Gulf of Mexico, I need something to revive my faith in humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - Is any play more perfectly titled than Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance? The Pulitzer Prize-winning 1966 play, now at the McCarter Theatre through Feb. 27, has well-coiffed suburbanites balancing their composure against chaotic forces within themselves and outside the door. Other balances are needed for a successful rendering of this play. As much as one wishes more of them were achieved in this Emily Mann-directed production, there's still plenty happening with such a rich script wrestled into life by high-caliber actors Kathleen Chalfant and John Glover.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
Anthony Quinn is chuckling. It's a deep, warm chuckle that rumbles up from the kettle drum of mirth in the potbelly he has borrowed from Zorba the Greek. Anthony Quinn is chuckling about someone's notion that the billing of his play (opening officially tonight at the Forrest Theater) should read "Zorba is Anthony Quinn" rather than "Anthony Quinn is Zorba. " "I think it's lovely, but I think it's nonsense, but they said the same thing when I played Gauguin . . . 'Requiem for a Heavyweight.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A door at the back of the darkened stage swings ajar to disgorge a man in a black jacket, who edges into a spotlit square and begins telling you a story. It is a story of life's randomness, something about an auto accident. Soon he is joined by a second man, who also appears involved in the story; it is, in fact, somehow his story. And In on It, a production at the Arden Theatre by Daniel MacIvor's Canadian company da da kamera, is off and running. As it initially unfolds, the story is about Ray, whose wife leaves him for a friend of theirs just as Ray is diagnosed with a fatal disease.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
GIBBSBORO Fifth grader Raymond Ennis penned a sticky scenario for his classmates: Would you keep your promise to play with your little brother or jump at the chance to hang out with a friend? The response was swift and decisive from the youngsters in his reading group during a lesson on character at Gibbsboro Elementary School. "If you make a promise, you should keep it," said Raymond, 11, drawing nods of agreement from a small circle of students. At Gibbsboro Elementary, character-building is part of the curriculum for all ages and subjects.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
  In   "Possessions," one of five very fine entries in The Oscar-Nominated Short Films 2014: Animated , the ghost spirit of a broken old umbrella springs to life, causing a night of splendid havoc for a weary Japanese traveler. A gorgeously realized homage to the concept of Tsukumogami - that after 100 years, tools and instruments attain souls and self-awareness - Shuhei Morita's 'toon works as a metaphor for the process of animation itself: Whether the artist is using pencil and paper, or spacewarp software, the inanimate is transformed into something alive and vital.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Alexander was an immigrant success story. A native of the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago, Alexander came to the United States in 1995 at age 44. He built his own auto-repair business in West Philadelphia, met a local woman, and had a son. His reputation as a hardworking, honest, law-abiding man was pristine - right up until he shotgunned his ex-girlfriend in front of her family. The question facing Common Pleas Court Judge Glenn B. Bronson is whether the 62-year-old Alexander's reputation alone is so sterling that it negates any criminal intent in the Feb. 26, 2013, killing of 37-year-old Jennifer Fitzpatrick.
SPORTS
January 21, 2014 | BY BERNARD FERNANDEZ, For the Daily News
IT SAYS MUCH when one legendary newspaperman feels as strongly about another as John Schulian does about Sandy Grady. Schulian, the 1984 recipient of the Boxing Writers Association of America's Nat Fleischer Award for Excellence in Boxing Journalism, calls Grady, one of his role models, "the Red Smith of Philadelphia from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. " That description is spot-on, and is much of a compliment to Smith, the late, great New York columnist who won the Fleischer in 1975 and in 1976 became the first sports writer to win a Pulitzer Prize, as it is to Grady.
SPORTS
January 17, 2014 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Columnist
THE CEMETERY in Southwest Philadelphia is an abandoned, tumbledown ruin, overgrown in many places, gravestones knocked on their sides. To attempt to find a grave there, amid tens of thousands of graves, would have been impossible without the help of the Friends of Mount Moriah Cemetery, a volunteer group working to preserve and restore the property. The email was answered within a day or so. Harry Shifren's grave is in Section K, Range 29, Lot 41. With a map, it took only a few minutes to find.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
JEAN LUC GODARD once said that all you need for a movie is a gun and a girl. Peter Jackson hasn't the option of a gun in his second "Hobbit" extravaganza, but he gives us the Middle Earth equivalent of the Godard exacta - a girl and a dragon. Both are desperately needed. Especially the girl - Evangeline Lilly, playing a female elf named Tauriel who appears nowhere in J.R.R. Tolkein's text, but surely can be found in the studio-boardroom minutes after executives pondered the demographics of "The Hobbit.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
THE ROM-COM ensemble "The Best Man" was a surprise hit when released in 1999, winning the week against "Fight Club" and Martin Scorsese 's "Bringing Out the Dead. " That's usually the prelude for a quick sequel, but it's taken a full 14 years for the follow-up, "Best Man Holiday," in part because writer-director Malcolm Lee didn't want to make a sequel back then. "I was a young director. This was my first movie. I didn't want to get pigeon-holed. I wanted to try different things," Lee, in town Thursday to promote the movie, told Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson . "But there's no question it made news.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
IF YOU THINK the movie-ratings system in the U.S. is arbitrary, maybe you should go to Sweden. In the equality-minded Scandinavian country, they're introducing a new rating to highlight gender bias, or rather the absence of it. To get an "A" rating, a movie must pass the so-called Bechdel test, which means it must have at least two named female characters who talk with each other about something other than a man. Like, say, "Thelma and Louise....
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Finding the perfect wig for your Halloween costume can be the difference between a trick or a treat. Especially this year when our celebrities du jour - many of whom do scary things all year long - are so creative when it comes to coifs. Think Nicki Minaj's ombré, white-to-pink tresses; singer Miguel's dark pompadour; and the signature Afro of Philly's own Questlove Thompson that isn't complete without a perfect power-to-the-people pick. "The wig makes the character," said Lois Arnold, owner of Lois A. Wigs on South Fourth Street.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
* MASTERS OF SEX. 10 p.m. Sunday, Showtime.   MICHAEL SHEEN'S played famous people before - David Frost in "Frost/Nixon," former British prime minister Tony Blair in three movies, including "The Queen" - but he's never portrayed anyone quite like Dr. William Masters, the groundbreaking sex researcher whose story Sheen brings to life in Showtime's "Masters of Sex. " "So much of him is buried, and he shows so little of what's really going...
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