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LIVING
December 9, 1994 | By Cheryl Lynne Potter, FOR THE INQUIRER
The main ingredient of artist Osman Karriem Hayes' art form is so exotic it can be found right there on the grocery-store shelf, in between such household items as plastic wrap, sandwich bags, and other paper products. And to most people, the thin, shiny sheets that are Hayes' principal medium are no secret ingredient at all: They're just plain old aluminum foil. It doesn't matter what name is on the foil package wrapper. Hayes, who calls himself a "tinfoil artist," is able to manipulate the silvery, pliable material into whatever character his fertile imagination suggests.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Kristeen Fabrizio hobbled into the cafeteria at the Phoenixville Area Junior High School, her legs bound in a narrow, ankle-length elastic tube. "I swim. I fell in love," said Fabrizio, 10, of Phoenixville, when she took her turn on stage Tuesday morning. "Who am I?" Dozens of second, third and fourth graders waved their hands, eager to guess whom Fabrizio was portraying in the Barkley Elementary School's Character Costume Cavalcade. The cavalcade was part of the monthlong "Kids Who Read Succeed Program" coordinated by librarian Lois Boyer and elementary school principal Joseph C. Dougherty.
NEWS
August 15, 2010 | By Michael Smerconish
Steve Solms died last week. I knew him only peripherally, but always got a kick out of his joie de vivre. Others have reminisced about the time the real estate developer and diehard 76ers fan brazenly walked onto the court during player introductions and presented Julius Erving with a doctor's bag. I'll always remember seeing Solms in the midst of a real estate crash, but looking no worse for the wear at poolside in Las Vegas and flashing a wad of...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The Internet comic strip Get Your War On by David Rees has been commenting on the war on terrorism by showing people in offices talking to one another on the phone or over coffee and doughnuts about the state of the world. The Rude Mechanicals of Austin, Texas, have adapted the comic strip (www.getyourwaron.com) for the stage, using overhead projectors and five actors in suits, ties and high heels. They provide an illustrated, damning chronicle of the Bush administration, starting in 2001 and tracing the war on terrorism through Afghanistan and Iraq, with excursions into the anthrax scares, Enron, the Katrina catastrophe, and Terry Schiavo.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Surabhi Avasthi, New York Daily News
At the end of the day, Tracey Ullman has no trouble peeling off her many personae - and the various wigs, mustaches and thick accents that go along with each. "I don't get attached to any of them for more than half an hour," Ullman says of the gallery of quirky characters she plays on her HBO comedy series, "Tracey Takes On . . . " which kicks off its second season at 11 p.m. tomorrow. "I'm quite glad to take them all off and go back to being Tracey. " When she's not in character, the 37-year-old British comic actress wears simple, tailored clothing and no makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Brendan Behan's 1958 play The Hostage concerns a British soldier taken prisioner by the Irish Republican Army in retaliation for the planned execution of an IRA member. That's the plot, but it certainly isn't the play. In fact, Behan spends probably less than half of this three-hour piece dealing with the plot. The rest of the time is spent on the frequently crazy doings of a passel of minor characters and in the performance of a large number of mostly humorous songs. The Hostage, which Temple University Theaters is producing, is a strange theatrical bird.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010
By Glenn Taylor Ecco Press. 360 pp. $24.99 Reviewed by Sherrie Flick Many of us like television shows, even the predictable programs in which the characters consistently react the way you expect. In these shows, the ending isn't so much a revelation as a logical conclusion. It can be comforting to watch these shows and not have to think much. On the other hand, I try to read a lot. Reading makes me happy to be alive, and some days when it's hot and humid and oil is spilling into the Gulf of Mexico, I need something to revive my faith in humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - Is any play more perfectly titled than Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance? The Pulitzer Prize-winning 1966 play, now at the McCarter Theatre through Feb. 27, has well-coiffed suburbanites balancing their composure against chaotic forces within themselves and outside the door. Other balances are needed for a successful rendering of this play. As much as one wishes more of them were achieved in this Emily Mann-directed production, there's still plenty happening with such a rich script wrestled into life by high-caliber actors Kathleen Chalfant and John Glover.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
Anthony Quinn is chuckling. It's a deep, warm chuckle that rumbles up from the kettle drum of mirth in the potbelly he has borrowed from Zorba the Greek. Anthony Quinn is chuckling about someone's notion that the billing of his play (opening officially tonight at the Forrest Theater) should read "Zorba is Anthony Quinn" rather than "Anthony Quinn is Zorba. " "I think it's lovely, but I think it's nonsense, but they said the same thing when I played Gauguin . . . 'Requiem for a Heavyweight.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A door at the back of the darkened stage swings ajar to disgorge a man in a black jacket, who edges into a spotlit square and begins telling you a story. It is a story of life's randomness, something about an auto accident. Soon he is joined by a second man, who also appears involved in the story; it is, in fact, somehow his story. And In on It, a production at the Arden Theatre by Daniel MacIvor's Canadian company da da kamera, is off and running. As it initially unfolds, the story is about Ray, whose wife leaves him for a friend of theirs just as Ray is diagnosed with a fatal disease.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
Fictional prison life agrees with Blair Brown. Playing an inmate on Netflix's Orange Is the New Black  "just rejuvenated my soul and made me very happy to be in this business and made me like acting again," the actress told reporters a few months ago. One of the more recent additions to Netflix's women-in-prison dramedy, which releases its fourth season Friday, Brown plays celebrity chef Judy King, a character to whom the shorthand Martha...
NEWS
June 5, 2016
By Richard Russo Knopf. 485 pp. $27.95 Reviewed by Bob Hoover In the alternative universe of the novel, the universe without an alternative, i.e., the actual world, seldom intrudes unless the novelist is able to reflect one within the other. Richard Russo's hermetically sealed novels roll without even a distant signal from real life. Set vaguely in the recent past, the books are concerned chiefly with his world of underclass white folks whose thoughts center largely on themselves.
NEWS
May 31, 2016
By Ryan Manion Borek This Memorial Day, I reflect on the loss of my brother, First Lt. Travis Manion, who was killed in the Anbar province of Iraq nine years ago. Since the day my family received the knock on the door informing us of his sacrifice, I knew it would be a long and difficult road ahead, as I was now the only child of the Manion family. What I couldn't know then, however, was that, through Travis, I would gain a sister. I met Amy Hastings Looney several years ago, but initially, I only knew her as the girlfriend - and later wife - of Brendan Looney.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Tick off Theatre Horizon's production of Becky Mode's Fully Committed as one more reason to remain on this end of the New Jersey Turnpike. Sure, you could see Modern Family 's Jesse Tyler Ferguson doing it on Broadway, but why? Philadelphia's own Michael Doherty - a University of the Arts grad who's become one of the city's most reliable young talents - plays all 36 of the show's characters just fine right here in Norristown. The solo comedy, which premiered in 2000, takes place in the backroom bowels of an au courant Manhattan restaurant specializing in molecular gastronomy.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Allison Steele, STAFF WRITERS
Democrat Hillary Clinton attacked presumed Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's character and questioned his refusal to release his tax returns as she campaigned Wednesday in New Jersey ahead of the state's June 7 primary. Clinton was just beginning an assault on Trump's proposal for steep tax cuts for the wealthy when a man in the audience at Camden County College in Blackwood shouted, "What about his tax returns?" She smiled and said, "We'll get to that. " "Because when you run for president, especially when you become the nominee, that is kind of expected," Clinton said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
LOS ANGELES - Paul Bettany has had an impressive career, with Academy Award-worthy fare like A Beautiful Mind on his resumé - yet he says he might be most impressed by the achievement of his latest film, Captain America: Civil War . "You watch these and you see that they're incredibly difficult films to make," said Bettany, who plays The Vision. "I have directed a movie and I wouldn't have the first clue how to go about making a movie with this many moving parts. The Russo brothers did a great job. " Bettany's character has grown from the voice of Jarvis in 2008's Iron Man to a full, evolving character in last year's Avengers: Age of Ultron , and that was always part of the famous long-range vision of Marvel Studios.
NEWS
April 24, 2016
As HBO's Game of Thrones moves into uncharted territory Sunday, going beyond George R.R. Martin's source material, it might help to remember where we left off: Arya Stark (Maisie Williams) Last seen: Being blinded as punishment for using the magic of the Many-Faced God to kill Meryn Trant - the first name on her long hit list. Bran Stark (Isaac Hempstead-Wright) Last seen:   In the Season Four finale, where the character known as the Three-Eyed Raven tells him, "You'll never walk again.
SPORTS
April 22, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, DAILY NEWS COLUMNIST
EARL WEAVER, the late Hall of Fame manager with the Baltimore Orioles, once said he didn't believe in momentum because the next day's starting pitcher could take it from you. You can't find exactly when he said it, or whom he said it to, but there are hundreds of managers out there, if not thousands, who have embraced it as gospel ever since. Over the years, it's been shortened to "Momentum is only as good as the next day's starter" - which seems a great entry to addressing something T.J. Oshie said after Wednesday night's game.
NEWS
April 20, 2016
By Carrie Lukas Hillary Clinton wants to have it both ways. She wants voters to support her because they'd like a rerun of her husband's presidency (remembered as an era of relative peace and prosperity), but she doesn't want to have to answer for her husband's personal conduct and character. Yet Bill Clinton's treatment of women - and the many other scandals and ethical lapses that plagued his presidency - are a legitimate and important issue for voters to consider. Hillary Clinton wants to dismiss all such questions as dirty, tabloid politics meant to distract voters from real issues.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Theater Critic
C rime, punishment, lies, and miracles aren't the typical themes found in popular musical theater, much less in a single show. But See What I Wanna See, the Michael John LaChiusa musical in 11th Hour Theatre Company's landmark 11th season, is taking actors, directors, and audiences into far deeper water than Rodgers and Hammerstein. Playing April 28-May 15 at Christ Church Neighborhood House, the musical begins with a medieval Japanese woman anticipating, with graphic relish, stabbing her lover during sex - in honor of her husband.
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