CollectionsCharacters
IN THE NEWS

Characters

ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Natalia is the central character in Ivan Turgenev's A Month in the Country, and in the Simply Classic Theatre Company production the performance of the role is indicative of what is both successful and unsatisfying about the production. Jessica Hendra's intelligent portrayal shows the many sides of this bored, restless wife of a wealthy 19th-century Russian landlord. From scene to scene, the audience sees Natalia as flirt, Natalia as commanding lady of the manor, Natalia as calculating manipulator and, finally, Natalia smitten by love.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1986 | By NANCY M. REICHARDT, Special to the Daily News
Daytime soap operas are comprised of cast members who are for the most part talented, beautiful and extremely capable of giving their audience a quality performance on a daily basis. But with the influx of newer, and oft-times younger, cast members, many of the talented people we've grown to know and love have fallen by the story-line wayside. They're brought out of mothballs only when they're needed to tie up loose ends for other characters on their shows. One of daytime's most underrated actors is Quinn Redeker, who portrays Alex Marshall on "Days of Our Lives.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Ferrigno's characters are nothing if not colorful. In his latest novel, The Cheshire Moon, there is Quinn, a former investigative reporter who now works for Slap magazine, a "snide, trendy monthly" described as "attack journalism with a manicure. " The publisher is an Italian megamillionaire, "a little man with exquisite taste in art and a soft, dirty laugh. " He recruits Quinn with this appeal: "As for the moral pygmies who condemn us, together we will kick their teeth out. " Quinn's friend Andy "specializes in heavily discounted status toys.
LIVING
February 17, 1994 | By Sue Chastain, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, the Washington Post and USA Today
You thought you'd never see another book like Joseph Heller's classic, Catch-22? Think again. Heller has written a sequel to the 1961 work - Closing Time - and Simon & Schuster is expected to have it in bookstores this fall, the New York Times reported yesterday. "The book and its title come directly from my stage in my career and my stage in life," Heller told the Times. "It occurred to me that it might be a good idea to write about some of the characters of Catch-22, blend them in with a number of new characters and infuse it with my new experiences since World War II. " Closing Time does not continue where Catch-22 left off - in the Mediterranean during the final months of World War II - but is set in present- day New York.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
I have just learned of the death of my old friend "Joe the Goat" of South Philadelphia. He died when I was on vacation last month and Jimmy Nicholson, the Daily News obit writer, gave him a real nice send-off. Joe the Goat, who paid taxes under the name of Joseph Di Rito, was a piece of work. He was one of the stable of unforgettable characters who filled the life of the late Frank Palumbo with joy and laughter. If Frank Palumbo couldn't laugh, he didn't want any part of it. Joe the Goat was one of an endless parade of characters who walked in and out of Frank Palumbo's life, giving Palumbo's - a 103-year-old nightclub and restaurant at Ninth and Catharine in South Philadelphia - a splash of charm and color unmatched anywhere in this city.
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
The late Jerome Irving Rodale, founder of the Emmaus, Pa., publishing and natural-foods empire that bears his name, once got the playwriting bug real bad and wrote some 40 works of "organic theater" on such burning themes as the danger of sugar and the virtues of good nutrition. He not only wrote them, he produced them - on Broadway as well as in his own personal theater in Allentown. They were uniformly awful. He became something of a laughingstock thereby, but he persisted in the name of disseminating the organic gospel.
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The transition of Scooby-Doo from perennially popular animated hound to computer-generated multiplex hero got us thinking about our own favorite cartoon characters. Some are people. Some are animals - which doesn't stop them from wearing shoes. But in their struggles - which will go on in reruns forever - we see ourselves in each of them. Mickey Mouse. Even if you're Disney-averse - or, like us, you favor Donald Duck and his miser uncle, Scrooge McDuck - you've got to give the rodent his due. Since 1928's "Steamboat Willie," Mickey has been king of all 'toon merchandise and a symbol for a global entertainment empire and American capitalism itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Site Installation Theater Ensemble says it's presenting The Pitchfork Disney in a second-floor space above an Old City art gallery because a body was once found under the building's floorboards. SITE, which produces plays in locales pertinent to the works at hand, doesn't provide details of the grisly discovery that occurred in the distant past of the 200-year-old building at 213 Arch St. Indeed, the story may be more legend than fact. But just the possibility that a body was hidden there makes this an appropriate venue for SITE's accomplished production of the brooding, menacing, thoroughly engrossing Pitchfork Disney.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
    "IF YOU have a character who is smelling and tasting green onions and also has a hand on their bottom, your audience understands them better," said Diana Gabaldon , the mega-best-selling author of the Outlander series. Gabaldon was explaining why she needed to travel to Philadelphia in order to write the most recent entry in the series, Written in My Own Heart's Blood , which takes place during the Revolutionary War. If she imbues her characters with more sensory details - from bad breath to some backside-related flirting - her faraway characters become real for her readers, who have gobbled up 17 million copies of her books in print.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It's a dark and stormy day. Mary Shelley is sitting in her parlor doing needlework and chatting with the monster she created more than three decades earlier in her novel Frankenstein. She calls him Percival, and he serves as her butler. That is the opening scene of The Day Mary Shelley Met Charlotte Bronte, which Society Hill Playhouse is producing. If it seems a bit strange to find an author talking to one of her characters, well, the play by Eduardo Manet gets even stranger. The front doorbell rings and the monster admits novelist Charlotte Bronte.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|