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Characters

ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When the curtain rises on Safe as Houses, the world-premiere play on view through April 5 at the McCarter Theatre, you see the darkened living room of a large Connecticut house in 1980. Hidden in a wing chair, a young guest overhears his host, the editor of an intellectual magazine, romancing the magazine's comely art director. As Act 1 of Richard Greenberg's play proceeds, you will meet three other characters - the editor's wife, his adored college-age son (a friend of the inadvertent eavesdropper)
NEWS
March 26, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Children's book characters Nicky Fifth and T-Bone have been promoted to "junior ambassadors" to promote New Jersey tourism and repair a tarnished state image that officials blame partly on Snooki and the Situation. The state Assembly's Tourism and the Arts Committee took the action Friday at a hearing in Burlington City held to determine the needs of the region's history-tour planners and festival organizers. Chairman Matthew W. Milam (D., Cape May) said he wanted the committee to see historic Burlington City, founded in 1677, to "get a visual" that could help the legislators fight for tourism funding.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Hugo Wolf's success in writing opera was limited, but in his song cycle Das italienisches Liederbuch, he succeeded in sketching an opera full of sentiment, nobility and comedy. This group of 46 songs doesn't reach the stage often, which made the performance Friday at the Convention Center all the more intriguing. Soprano Benita Valente and baritone William Stone managed, with only voice and text, to create the characters of a comedy of manners in which the piano, played by the remarkable David Golub, took a sly and equal role.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Annette bounded into the class, her Mickey Mouse ears pinned jauntily on her head and her short black skirt swinging to and fro. "I'm 12, and I'm a Mouseketeer," she told the class. "Now let's all march in place and do the roll call salute. " The classroom packed with first and second graders at Episcopal Academy in Devon resounded with stomping as each student yelled out his or her name. "I'm from 1956, and I'm kind of confused about all this stuff I see around me," she said, scanning the room with wide-eyed wonderment.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Brian Benben has a disarming tendency to twinkle under pressure. He probably can't help it. Up just five minutes from an afternoon nap at the Ritz-Carlton, the rubber-faced actor finds himself grappling with concepts like good vs. evil, short vs. tall, cable vs. broadcast. And when he makes a point, he leans forward a little. And smiles. And twinkles. Sadly, there is no other word for it. The star of HBO's "Dream On" was in Philadelphia this week to promote today's opening of the movie "Radioland Murders," in which he stars with Mary Stuart Masterson.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's hammy. Never mind Resnais' revered filmography ( Last Year at Marienbad; The War Is Over; Hiroshima, Mon Amour ), this tale of six souls seeking connection in a bourgeoisie Paris is a dud. A woman engaged to an out-of-work drunk looks for an apartment, confounded by the small spaces and arbitrary partitions. (Each character comes with his or her set of metaphoric walls.) The real estate agent assisting her searches for joy in his life and thinks he's found it when his office assistant, a devout Christian, presents him with a videotape of her favorite show.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
    "IF YOU have a character who is smelling and tasting green onions and also has a hand on their bottom, your audience understands them better," said Diana Gabaldon , the mega-best-selling author of the Outlander series. Gabaldon was explaining why she needed to travel to Philadelphia in order to write the most recent entry in the series, Written in My Own Heart's Blood , which takes place during the Revolutionary War. If she imbues her characters with more sensory details - from bad breath to some backside-related flirting - her faraway characters become real for her readers, who have gobbled up 17 million copies of her books in print.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There's a strange sort of bookending between Philadelphia Theatre Company's 40th-season opener, Lisa D'Amour's Detroit , and last season's production of Christopher Durang's Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike . Where Durang's characters examined contemporary America through the eyes of an elder generation filled with nostalgia and disdain for today's careless youth, D'Amour brings us up to date, in real time, with the American Dream's death...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With its rat-a-tat script, focus on sex, sexuality and stardom, and hip exploration of neurosis and insincerity, The Little Dog Laughed is a howler. And there's no doubt about it - the play by Douglas Carter Beane (he also wrote the tickling book for the stage-musical version of Xanadu) can be a fun ride in the Flashpoint Theatre Company production that opened Thursday at the Adrienne. But, too often, at half-speed. On Broadway three years ago, when Little Dog opened, it exploited the way the four characters paraded their bizarre psyches, and resulted in belly-laughs; we knew these folks were outlandish, and so did they.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Stanley and Iris are boring. So, alas, is "Stanley & Iris. " They're nice people, good people, strong people, but they are not, as they say in Hollywood, cinematic. Iris (Jane Fonda) is a recently widowed woman who works in a bakery. Stanley (Robert De Niro) is an illiterate man who also works in the bakery. Can she teach him to read? Can he teach her to find romance again? Cue the love theme. The real question is whether director Martin Ritt ("Norma Rae") can make it interesting.
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