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Characters

ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the countdown to her first dinner party in four years, and Libby is a nervous wreck. Her friend, Griever, is too busy doing shtick in front of a mirror to help with the preparations. And the guest of honor, a lesbian writer named Alice, is having problems of her own with her lover, a family therapist named Boo. So begins Blue Window, a sweet but unsatisfying Craig Lucas play. Filled with amusing writing and eccentric characters, the piece has a serious intent: to underline the mystery of human personality and the tragedy of missed connections between even the well-intentioned among us. In the end, however, despite an amiable production by the Fictitious Theatre Company at the 2d Stage at the Adrienne Theatre, its emotional impact is minimal.
LIVING
November 10, 1994 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's go over this one more time. There is reality and there is fiction. Sitcoms are fiction. Make-believe. Of course the actors are real. But - and this is the part that is confusing to some people - the actors play characters, and characters are fiction. Remember? Apparently publishers don't. They've created a new genre of books, penned by comedians using the voice of their fictional characters. Those characters spout philosophy, humor and bons mots to real people, with real money, who buy the tomes.
LIVING
December 14, 2001 | By Kay Raftery FOR THE INQUIRER
Hare Franz looks elegant in his flowered waistcoat and corduroy pants, a small, brown leather pouch dangling from his paw. Standing up to his full 3-foot height, long pointed ears tipped forward, he looks as if he were about to step out for a morning stroll. He seems quite real, though of course he isn't. Hare Franz is just one of the characters that populate the mind of artist Carol Marker, who creates him and other rabbits, Country Santas, and witches in a two-story studio known as the Sunday House that was built by her husband, Richard, across from their rambling old farmhouse in Boyertown, Berks County.
NEWS
October 1, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Menopause the Musical belongs to a particular genre of theater that includes shows such as Nunsense and Respect: A Musical Journey of Women, exists to entertain women of a certain age looking to escape the daily grind, and if the tunes are familiar, so much the better. Or, one could contend, it exists solely to insult the intelligence of people who love theater. Pick a side, any side, because either way there's plenty of company. Jeanie Linders' revue - about four female archetypes (instead of being given proper names, they're called "Professional Woman," "Soap Star," "Iowa Housewife," and "Earth Mother")
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | By Melanie D. Scott INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With a story that used an apple as a time machine and a friendly squirrel named Sequins as the narrator, kindergartners and first graders at the Eleanor Rush School traveled back to 1864 to learn a brief lesson about slavery. They gathered for a play about a 9-year-old character named Addy Walker, whose father and brother were sold into slavery in the South but who escaped to Philadelphia with her mother. Dressed in a pink, patterned jumper for her first day of school, Addy learns that she now has something she never had before - the power to choose her own path in life.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the wheatfields of Tennessee to the rice paddies of China - picturesquely backlit, as if products rather than places - Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor sells American patriotism hollow as souvenir plastic Liberty Bells. As framed by screenwriter Randall "Braveheart" Wallace, the three-hour spectacle spans the twilight of the United States as a nation of isolationism and Depression to its dawn as an engaged superpower. On the intervening day, Dec. 7, 1941, a stealth air and naval attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor by the Japanese resulted in the loss of lives and American innocence.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2010
LONG BEFORE Laura Linney appeared on the scene as a cranky cancer patient in "The Big C," Showtime had already established itself as the network for characters who were fed up and weren't going to be taking it anymore. "It" being, variously, downsizing after a death in the family ("Weeds"), living in a constant state of emergency without benefit of medication ("Nurse Jackie"), being required to take medication to suppress excess personalities ("United States of Tara") or remaining faithful to one person in an environment where temptation was everywhere ("Californication" and "The Tudors")
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The roles of Rodgers and Mr. Armitage in Sherlock Holmes and the Speckled Band are relatively small, but anyone who has seen the current production at the Walnut Street Theater will have no trouble recalling the elderly butler and the feisty village grocer. The characters attract attention from their opening lines. Addressed as "poor old Rodgers," the butler mournfully replies: "It used to be poor young Rodgers. Then it was poor Rodgers and now it's poor old Rodgers. That's the story of my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Nashville, the capital of country music and also Tennessee, has approximately 100,000 more inhabitants than Omaha, the nation's karaoke capital per the film Duets. Accordingly, Nashville, the epoch-defining 1975 picture, is approximately 100,000 times better than the derivative Duets. In the new film, barflies achieve self-actualization while belting the lyrics to Top 40 hits. Though it features excellent performances by Paul Giamatti and Andre Braugher (if only workmanlike turns from Maria Bello, Huey Lewis, Gwyneth Paltrow and Scott Speedman)
LIVING
April 2, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
"I've been a 17-year-old aerobics instructor; I've been a 95-year-old woman recovering from a stroke; I've been the worst, most greedy and disgusting sort of 30-year-old yuppie imaginable - who has a better life than I do?" exults Tracey Ullman. Now in its second full season, Fox Broadcasting's The Tracey Ullman Show (Channel 29, Sundays at 9:30 p.m.) remains one of the most unpredictable of all television shows. Tuning in, you never know where the British-born Ullman is going to pop up or who she'll be portraying.
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