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NEWS
October 1, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Menopause the Musical belongs to a particular genre of theater that includes shows such as Nunsense and Respect: A Musical Journey of Women, exists to entertain women of a certain age looking to escape the daily grind, and if the tunes are familiar, so much the better. Or, one could contend, it exists solely to insult the intelligence of people who love theater. Pick a side, any side, because either way there's plenty of company. Jeanie Linders' revue - about four female archetypes (instead of being given proper names, they're called "Professional Woman," "Soap Star," "Iowa Housewife," and "Earth Mother")
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | By Melanie D. Scott INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With a story that used an apple as a time machine and a friendly squirrel named Sequins as the narrator, kindergartners and first graders at the Eleanor Rush School traveled back to 1864 to learn a brief lesson about slavery. They gathered for a play about a 9-year-old character named Addy Walker, whose father and brother were sold into slavery in the South but who escaped to Philadelphia with her mother. Dressed in a pink, patterned jumper for her first day of school, Addy learns that she now has something she never had before - the power to choose her own path in life.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the wheatfields of Tennessee to the rice paddies of China - picturesquely backlit, as if products rather than places - Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor sells American patriotism hollow as souvenir plastic Liberty Bells. As framed by screenwriter Randall "Braveheart" Wallace, the three-hour spectacle spans the twilight of the United States as a nation of isolationism and Depression to its dawn as an engaged superpower. On the intervening day, Dec. 7, 1941, a stealth air and naval attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor by the Japanese resulted in the loss of lives and American innocence.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The roles of Rodgers and Mr. Armitage in Sherlock Holmes and the Speckled Band are relatively small, but anyone who has seen the current production at the Walnut Street Theater will have no trouble recalling the elderly butler and the feisty village grocer. The characters attract attention from their opening lines. Addressed as "poor old Rodgers," the butler mournfully replies: "It used to be poor young Rodgers. Then it was poor Rodgers and now it's poor old Rodgers. That's the story of my life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Nashville, the capital of country music and also Tennessee, has approximately 100,000 more inhabitants than Omaha, the nation's karaoke capital per the film Duets. Accordingly, Nashville, the epoch-defining 1975 picture, is approximately 100,000 times better than the derivative Duets. In the new film, barflies achieve self-actualization while belting the lyrics to Top 40 hits. Though it features excellent performances by Paul Giamatti and Andre Braugher (if only workmanlike turns from Maria Bello, Huey Lewis, Gwyneth Paltrow and Scott Speedman)
LIVING
April 2, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
"I've been a 17-year-old aerobics instructor; I've been a 95-year-old woman recovering from a stroke; I've been the worst, most greedy and disgusting sort of 30-year-old yuppie imaginable - who has a better life than I do?" exults Tracey Ullman. Now in its second full season, Fox Broadcasting's The Tracey Ullman Show (Channel 29, Sundays at 9:30 p.m.) remains one of the most unpredictable of all television shows. Tuning in, you never know where the British-born Ullman is going to pop up or who she'll be portraying.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'The first thing you must know about me is that I am colossally fat," says Arthur Opp in the opening line of Philadelphia author Liz Moore's second novel, Heft , which is due Jan. 23. Arthur isn't a typical hero. A 58-year-old former literature professor, he weighs nearly 600 pounds and lives a solitary life in a Brooklyn brownstone he hasn't left in 18 years. (He did venture as far as the front steps once, 10 years ago.) A bittersweet novel, Heft is peopled by men and women so isolated by their fear of rejection, they've ceased to seek meaningful connections.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In their approach to the sins of apartheid, many writers have preferred to focus on whites stricken by conscience rather than black victims of an invidious system. While this perspective has allowed novelists and dramatists to consider some rich and taxing moral dilemmas, it has always carried at least the suggestion of condescension. Pamela Gien's The Syringa Tree, which opened Tuesday at the Arden Theatre in a Philadelphia premiere, is a demanding solo piece that takes a different tack.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Hollywood, where most directors fight to get their name above the title, Martin Ritt let the characters star. The filmmaker, who died last Saturday at the age of 76, was survived by his wife, Adele; his daughter, Martina Ritt Werner; his son, Michael, and some indelible characters named Hud, Norma Rae, and Stanley and Iris, not to mention a hound called Sounder. Martin Ritt was a sturdy, bullnecked guy who resembled the gruffest of bookies and spoke like the gentlest of scholars.
LIVING
October 27, 1996 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
'THE ONLY PERSON you have to prove anything to is yourself," Jimmy Murtha tells a young protege in tonight's premiere of EZ Streets. "Don't get hurt trying. " Paul Haggis won't get hurt if his brilliant, layered cops-and-robbers series - the best since NYPD Blue - proves to be just a bit too much for the giggle-hungry TV masses. One of television's most versatile producers - he's worked everything from The Facts of Life to Walker, Texas Ranger, from The Tracey Ullman Show to the delightful cult favorite Due South - Haggis is always in demand.
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