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Characters

SPORTS
February 7, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flanked by former Flyers Bernie Parent, Gary Dornhoefer, and Bob Kelly, Hollywood movie director and rock musician Rob Zombie talked Tuesday night about the motion picture he is creating about the Broad Street Bullies. Parent suggested that Danny DeVito could play the role of Kelly. Dornhoefer interceded. "Moses can play you," Dornhoefer told Parent, who looked distinguished in his white hair and matching goatee. Zombie said the project is in its early stages, and he attended Tuesday's game against Tampa Bay to visit with some of the Broad Street Bullies - the brawling teams that won Stanley Cups in 1974 and 1975 - and to observe the fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - Is any play more perfectly titled than Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance? The Pulitzer Prize-winning 1966 play, now at the McCarter Theatre through Feb. 27, has well-coiffed suburbanites balancing their composure against chaotic forces within themselves and outside the door. Other balances are needed for a successful rendering of this play. As much as one wishes more of them were achieved in this Emily Mann-directed production, there's still plenty happening with such a rich script wrestled into life by high-caliber actors Kathleen Chalfant and John Glover.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
* SHAMELESS. 9 p.m. Sunday, Showtime.   PASADENA, CALIF. - Emmy Rossum has stopped worrying about looking too good. Three seasons into "Shameless," the Showtime series in which she stars as Fiona Gallagher, a harried twenty-something who's raising her siblings with no help whatsoever from their alcoholic father (William H. Macy), Rossum's found a way to bridge the divide between the polished red-carpet persona that's made her the darling of fashion bloggers and her often disheveled character, whose look she also loves - if only for its ease.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Hipster history. Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson , a rock musical by Alex Timbers and Philadelphia's Michael Friedman, was a huge success in New York. But the Plays & Players production feels as flat as cowpie; what excitement there was at Sunday's performance felt forced, and despite the young audience, there were few laughs and fewer shrieks. Daniel Student's direction seemed slow and flaccid; the slacker delivery sounded as if cast members had barely memorized their lines. Jamison Foreman leads the onstage band, although there isn't a memorable song in the show's 2½ hours.
SPORTS
January 18, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
LANCE ARMSTRONG was light on the details and didn't name names, but he confessed to using performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France during an interview with Oprah Winfrey , reversing more than a decade of denial. He mused that he might not have been caught if not for his comeback in 2009. And he was certain his "fate was sealed" when longtime friend, training partner and trusted lieutenant George Hincapie , who was along for the ride on all seven of Armstrong's Tour de France wins from 1999-2005, was forced to give him up to anti-doping authorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
With Irish accents you could make a meal of, the Lantern Theater production of Martin McDonagh's The Beauty Queen of Leenane , under director Kathryn MacMillan's sharp eye and steady hand, is an unqualified triumph. Like all of McDonagh's early plays, Beauty Queen takes place in rural Ireland, and it is as much about the place as it is about the people who inhabit it: extreme personalities, desperate and needy, longing for escape, filled with spite. Often his characters are violent, stuffed with irrational self-justifications, and mostly these characters are men. Here the difference is that the characters are women, and they are locked in vicious combat.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By William C. Kashatus
Penn State's efforts to restore its integrity got a boost last week from Bill O'Brien, who announced his intention to return as the Nittany Lions' head football coach next season. O'Brien had reportedly heard overtures from several NFL teams, including the Eagles. But O'Brien's announcement came just as Gov. Corbett was giving Penn State another black eye by suing the NCAA over its harsh sanctions against the university. Corbett and O'Brien's respective decisions say much about the character of each man, as well as the difficulty of restoring Penn State's tarnished reputation.
NEWS
January 4, 2013
By Kathy Brennan When I heard there would be a third season of Downton Abbey , I thought about doing one of those heel clicks, like the leprechaun who finds Lucky Charms magically delicious. (Only fear of what it would do to my tennis game kept me earthbound.) And when I heard it wouldn't begin until this weekend, I realized I had something to look forward to during the most dismal time of year. Like life in Narnia, January in Philadelphia is always winter but never Christmas.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
Harry Carey Jr., 91, a familiar face in such John Ford classics as She Wore a Yellow Ribbon and The Searchers, as well as scores of other movies and television shows, from Perry Mason to B.L. Stryker, has died. Daughter Melinda Carey said he died last Thursday of natural causes surrounded by family at a hospice in Santa Barbara, Calif. "He went out as gracefully as he came in," she said. His career spanned more than 50 years. Later in life, he appeared in the movies Gremlins and Back to the Future Part III. While he lacked the leading-man stature of longtime friend John Wayne, his boyish looks and horse-riding skills earned him roles in many Ford films.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Bob Thomas, Associated Press
Charles Durning grew up in poverty, lost five of his nine siblings to disease, barely lived through D-Day, and was taken prisoner at the Battle of the Bulge. His hard life and wartime trauma provided the basis for a prolific 50-year career as a consummate Oscar-nominated character actor, playing everyone from a Nazi colonel to the pope to Dustin Hoffman's would-be suitor in Tootsie . Mr. Durning, who died Monday at age 89 in New York, got his start as an usher at a burlesque theater in Buffalo.
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