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Charade

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NEWS
July 3, 1990
A long time ago, back when the Blue Route was a new idea, people noticed that the major difference between courtrooms and public toilets in Philadelphia was that the courtrooms weren't locked. It was decided that we needed a new courthouse. Many mayors and many proposals followed, but we still didn't have a new courthouse. Then came Wilson Goode, a managing director with an idea. His idea was to knock down a lot of prime downtown real estate and put up a courthouse, complete with semi-detached jail.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A month after they lost a bid to save their school, parents from Assumption School in Atco have sent a letter to Camden's new bishop accusing their pastor of a "contrived and deceptive charade" and a "gross lack of financial accountability" involving more than $340,000. As they push back against the school's closing in June, parents say the Rev. Thomas Barcellona of Christ the Redeemer Church always intended to close the school despite telling parents that he would keep it open if they met enrollment and financial targets.
NEWS
January 28, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Theatrics and contrived rhetoric aside, there was one genuinely positive aspect to Ronald Reagan's latest annual State of the Union address. That is, we'll have to endure only one more of these performances before the trite old trouper tips his 20 Mule Team sombrero and rides off into the Santa Barbara sunset. Then, if Congress had the guts, it could move to scrap the whole phony charade and replace it with a more meaningful forum. In staid old Mother England, where the public gets to hear the prime minister addressing Parliament once a week, Margaret Thatcher's every pronouncement is greeted with a rapturous chorus of "Hear!
SPORTS
April 16, 1997 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
That might not have been just a poorly conceived scenario to help Allen Iverson score 40 points Monday night. It might been the 76ers' future on the line. If the Sixers want Jerry Stackhouse to stay after his three-year rookie contract expires after next season, things must change. In yesterday's aftermath of the clumsy, embarrassing collaboration to push Iverson to 40 for the fifth game in succession, that was the steely, hard-edged message Stackhouse delivered. Stackhouse openly wondered whether he, Iverson and injured forward Derrick Coleman could develop a winning chemistry.
NEWS
March 1, 1987
Now that Earl Stout has made himself de facto mayor of Philadelphia, why are W. Wilson Goode and Frank Rizzo going through this charade of running for office? William Sternman Philadelphia.
SPORTS
March 13, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers defenseman Chris Pronger should have had a stirring retirement celebration before Thursday night's game against Pittsburgh, saluting a career that will undoubtedly put him into the Hall of Fame. Instead, the charade continued. Pronger attended the game at the Wells Fargo Center, sat in general manager Paul Holmgren's suite and, perhaps because he is in the process of making a comeback (wink, wink), wasn't even acknowledged on the scoreboard. Earlier Thursday, during a news conference at the Flyers' practice facility in Voorhees, Pronger talked about trying to make a return from post-concussion syndrome.
NEWS
August 16, 1996
Two hundred and two inmates sit on death row in Pennsylvania. Since Gov. Ridge made good on a campaign pledge to revive capital punishment, the state has executed two men. Two more are scheduled to die later this month. In their rush to pile on the penalties and stamp out criminality, rarely do lawmakers pause to consider that - because of the imperfections in our judicial system - a person convicted, sentenced and executed could, in fact, be innocent. That's why the case of Neil Ferber is so important.
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | By Acel Moore
The President finally spoke Monday night, but unfortunately what he said will not bring closure to this shameful and embarrassing over-reaction by many leaders to a man's character flaw. True, the President satisfied few with his mea culpa. Even his supporters say he should have been more humble and apologized profusely to his staff and the American people for lying. Then there are those who say Monday's speech should have been delivered seven months ago, when allegations first surfaced about a tryst with former intern Monica Lewinsky.
SPORTS
November 26, 2010
ON THE DAY after he whipped Sonny Liston in Miami, Cassius Clay told a gaggle of white sports writers that he was joining the Nation of Islam and changing his name. They grumbled and told him he was demeaning the heavyweight championship of the world. He looked 'em in the eye and said, "I don't have to be what you want me to be!" That's a statement! It took faith, it took courage, it took boldness to say it. I don't have to be what you want me to be! And now, 46 years later, we have LeBron James in that pathetic, contrived, bullspit Nike spot, asking 29 pitiful questions, including, "Should I be what you want me to be?"
NEWS
December 26, 1996
Pursuing the impossible to create new wealth Here are some economic realities in rebuttal to the fantasies of Daniel S. Greenberg (Commentary, Dec. 22): One, many American industries are losing market dominance to overseas competition. Two, one of the few major areas remaining where this is not yet the case is the microcomputer industry. Three, without the breakthroughs in miniaturization necessitated by the manned space program from 1961 to 1969 that industry would not exist.
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NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, VINNY VELLA & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
RANDOLPH SANDERS attended Kim Jones' birthday party over the summer and her funeral last month. He shook hands with her friends and family, wearing a smile or a furrowed brow, depending on the occasion. He might as well have been wearing a mask. On the morning of Jan. 13, Sanders, 36, allegedly put a bullet in Jones' head and calmly walked away - then dialed her phone number minutes later to check on her well-being. Sanders hadn't yet seen her that morning, he said on her voice mail.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A month after they lost a bid to save their school, parents from Assumption School in Atco have sent a letter to Camden's new bishop accusing their pastor of a "contrived and deceptive charade" and a "gross lack of financial accountability" involving more than $340,000. As they push back against the school's closing in June, parents say the Rev. Thomas Barcellona of Christ the Redeemer Church always intended to close the school despite telling parents that he would keep it open if they met enrollment and financial targets.
SPORTS
March 13, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers defenseman Chris Pronger should have had a stirring retirement celebration before Thursday night's game against Pittsburgh, saluting a career that will undoubtedly put him into the Hall of Fame. Instead, the charade continued. Pronger attended the game at the Wells Fargo Center, sat in general manager Paul Holmgren's suite and, perhaps because he is in the process of making a comeback (wink, wink), wasn't even acknowledged on the scoreboard. Earlier Thursday, during a news conference at the Flyers' practice facility in Voorhees, Pronger talked about trying to make a return from post-concussion syndrome.
SPORTS
March 14, 2011
THE NFL LOCKOUT is upon us. It could be weeks before the U.S. District Court in Minneapolis rules on the preliminary injunction requested by the players who made up the entity formerly known as the NFL Players Association to block the lockout. Then the owners will appeal an unfavorable ruling, so the league could open up and shut back down again between now and training camp. To me, especially disappointing when the talks fell apart was the way the sides easily clicked into their default positions, making me wonder if 16 days of mediated talks in Washington produced anything, except a perpetually crowded sidewalk in front of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service and more business for the nearby Starbucks and Subway franchises.
SPORTS
November 26, 2010
ON THE DAY after he whipped Sonny Liston in Miami, Cassius Clay told a gaggle of white sports writers that he was joining the Nation of Islam and changing his name. They grumbled and told him he was demeaning the heavyweight championship of the world. He looked 'em in the eye and said, "I don't have to be what you want me to be!" That's a statement! It took faith, it took courage, it took boldness to say it. I don't have to be what you want me to be! And now, 46 years later, we have LeBron James in that pathetic, contrived, bullspit Nike spot, asking 29 pitiful questions, including, "Should I be what you want me to be?"
NEWS
December 9, 2008 | By John Sullivan and John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In January 2005, residents near the chlorine plant here discovered that it was the biggest mercury emitter in the state. Environmentalists warned them against eating fish from their beloved Hiwassee River. They appealed to the plant's owners, Olin Corp., to do what 100 other chlorine producers had done: abandon a 19th-century process that emits tons of the dangerous neurotoxin. Olin refused. In fall 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency weighed in - but not to take up the cause of residents.
NEWS
December 9, 2008 | By John Sullivan and John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writers
CHARLESTON, Tenn. - In January 2005, residents near the chlorine plant here discovered that it was the biggest mercury emitter in the state. Environmentalists warned them against eating fish from their beloved Hiwassee River. They appealed to the plant's owners, Olin Corp., to do what 100 other chlorine producers had done: abandon a 19th-century process that emits tons of the dangerous neurotoxin. Olin refused. In fall 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency weighed in - but not to take up the cause of residents.
NEWS
July 20, 2007 | By Kevin Ferris
"We represent the conscience of humanity. " That would be the perfect mission statement for a human-rights organization. Chisel it in stone above the dais where the group gathers. Members can speak in the words' august shadow, forever reminded of a need to represent those who endure oppression and torture, who fall victim to brutality and murder. Yet when those words actually were spoken before a human-rights group last year, they inspired no one. That's because, in a cruel, Orwellian twist, they were uttered on behalf of Sudan, where ethnic cleansing, religious persecution, slavery and genocide have killed hundreds of thousands and displaced millions.
NEWS
December 14, 2005
ARECENT editorial offered readers a fictional script between two sinister politicians plotting to enact the business privilege tax. As chief staff attorney for City Council at the time, I was present at many of the meetings where the legislation was developed. It was not greedy legislators but the Chamber of Commerce that was the driving force behind it. That chamber would never have dreamed that its members 20 years later could escape almost all taxation by repealing 100 percent of that tax. Back then, the chamber was willing to pay its fair share (except for a variety of big-business members like banks, insurance companies and stock brokers, which carved out exemptions for themselves)
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