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NEWS
May 3, 2000 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Those of us who consider ourselves experts on the Amazon rainforests because we eat the correct flavor of Ben & Jerry's ice cream could learn a thing or two from "The Charcoal People. " The documentary takes viewers to the starting point of the whole issue: the Brazilian migrant workers who clear-cut the forests and burn the wood for charcoal used to make the commodity pig iron. It's an awful way to eke out a living, but an estimated 60,000 Brazilian men and boys do. It's dangerous: They pull down trees with crude chains or fell them with chainsaws, wearing no more protective gear than T-shirts and shorts.
FOOD
May 14, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
Although the two-fisted, brawling newspaperman went out of style with the typewriter, a fight nearly broke out the other day between the Daily News beer columnist, Joe Sixpack, and the Daily News movie critic, yours truly, on the subject of grilling. This is not unusual. Men have been fighting over charred meat since Joe Neanderthal first put a rabbit on a stick and held it over a fire. Since then, of course, some evolution has occurred. Neanderthal and his knuckle-dragging descendants developed into Joe Sixpack, still charring his meat over coals, while the rest of us became Homo sapiens, improving life with things like the wheel, the Industrial Revolution, cable TV and the propane-fired, dual-burner barbecue grill with multiple warming racks.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Welbourn was packing heat. The hot dogs and pasta salad were still in the cooler, the beach blankets were spread on the sand and the sun was dipping into the Pacific Ocean when Welbourn reached into a bag for what was needed to really get things going - one can of Springfield Charcoal Lighter. A few liberal squirts and the toss of a match and presto - he had an inferno crackling in his beachside barbecue pit. As the flames danced, he slid the starter fluid back into his bag, like a gunman holstering his weapon, knowing the day will come when he has to use it again.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ranger Dick Lahey hoisted a shovelful of soil and masterfully pitched it overhead to land directly on a thin wisp of brown-tinted smoke rising from the 8-foot-tall mound of smoldering dirt-covered wood. In the traditional way, Lahey is slowly burning down the wood to make the charcoal that more than 100 years ago would have fueled the huge ore-melting furnace here. It was all part of yesterday's celebration of Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site's 59th birthday. Incorporated into the national park system on Aug. 3, 1938, the 848 acres near Elverson are a monument to early industry in America.
LIVING
July 22, 1996 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation may have made great strides against air pollution, but the battle is nowhere near over - especially in the summer. Come the hot months and the levels of ground-level ozone, a major enemy of the respiratory system, soar in the presence of heat. But there is a lot each of us can do to minimize the build-up of ozone, Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection advises. One place to start is the automobile, a prime villain in the ozone drama. Rather than run lots of little errands during the day, we should make extra efforts in summer to consolidate them into one big trip, DEP says.
NEWS
February 1, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Rarely can you stare into the eyes of a stranger who brushes past you on the street. Yet there they are, tantalizing windows into a person's soul. Off-limits. The unknown. Donald Stephens is a portal. The charcoal artist meticulously sketches faces, using shadows and furtive glances that reveal despair or hope. You can linger over his painting Street Watch, a study of eyes that depicts the distrust people often feel around strangers. The subject, Stephens said, "is worried because he needs to be watchful.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before coal was king, it was charcoal that fueled the furnaces and forges of colonial Pennsylvania's burgeoning ironmaking industry. A number of those charcoal ironworks were along the banks of the Perkiomen Creek in Montgomery County. For 140 years, from 1730 to 1870, they produced high-grade pig iron and bar iron for the local and Philadelphia markets. "The Perkiomen area had all the necessary resources needed to establish ironmaking works - iron ore and limestone deposits, water power, and abundant wood to produce charcoal," said Frank Hebblethwaite, site historian at the Hopewell Furnace Historical Site in Elverson.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
What better way to call adult students' attention to the importance of basic drawing skills than to arrange a drawing show to spotlight regional artists' current activity in that vein? Realizing this, Wayne Art Center got together an inventory that promotes up-to-date discussion on drawing, rather than merely supplying a review of the "major positions" produced by the art of drawing in the recent past. No one tames the fictitious and the bizarre in visions of Greek myths here like Stephen Tanis of Wilmington.
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Undeterred by a nonexistent government, charcoal producers are stripping Somalia of its trees in a frenzy to feed a ravenous export market. The exploitation is rapidly denuding Somalia, compounding the misery of this broken-down country with complications of soil erosion and desertification, where arable land turns to arid moonscape. Charcoal exports, prohibited before the collapse of President Mohamed Siad Barre's government in 1991 and even banned by some warlords during the civil war, have gone out of control in Somalia's unregulated economy.
FOOD
July 3, 2002 | By Maria Gallagher FOR THE INQUIRER
Consider the gas grill, the preferred appliance for six out of 10 Americans who grill. Clean-burning and convenient, ever willing to belch blue flames at the touch of a button, it's ready for duty in the few minutes it takes to walk to the fridge and retrieve some steaks. That is precisely why Al Roker, the sunny storm tracker on NBC's Today show, stopped using one. "My feeling is that we rush so many things today, we don't take time to enjoy the simple pleasures of life," he writes in the introduction to Al Roker's Big Bad Book of Barbecue: 100 Easy Recipes for Backyard Barbecue and Grilling (Scribner, $27.95)
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NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When May Wang got her first glimpse of the effluent flowing from the Camden sewage treatment plant into the Delaware River, she was not impressed. "It was not a pleasant experience, necessarily," she recalled. "But it was educational. " A subsequent research project by the 16-year-old student from Holland, Bucks County, won her a President's Environmental Youth Award, announced Wednesday. The award is given annually to one student in each of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 10 regions.
FOOD
July 4, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Soccer fans aren't the only ones with a good reason to focus their attention way south of the border on this Fourth of July: The foods of Brazil sizzle with flavor and spice, and mirror the fascinating melting pot that is the largest country in South America. This populous, geographically diverse country offers ingredients from coastal cities, tropical rain forests, wetlands, and grasslands. From plantation staples of sugar cane and coffee to native ingredients such as cashew fruits, pineapple, and ginger, the Brazilian pantry offers a wealth of rustic tastes and sophisticated pairings.
FOOD
July 5, 2013 | By Barry Zukerman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Southern-style barbecue has long been a passion of mine. On vacation, I've been known to detour for miles for a taste of smoked brisket or pulled pork. But for 15 years, I was forced to live in a state of DIY barbecue denial. There were "no grilling" clauses written into all my Center City leases. The break came when we moved to the suburbs last year. Though the move was too late in the year to start barbecuing right away, I spent the autumn and winter researching how to make authentic barbecue and purchasing the tools I'd need when the weather turned warm.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
TIRED OF taking the heat for your bad barbecuing? Maybe it's time to stop squirting the charcoal with stinky lighter fluid, dude. And who likes their food charred on the outside and raw inside? (Well, me, if it's sushi-grade tuna.) If you haven't shopped for one lately, you'd be shocked at how civilized and reliable barbecues have become. Even old-school charcoal cookers are getting teched up. And some gas-fired grills are almost as sophisticated as professional indoor ranges.
SPORTS
July 3, 2013 | BY JOHN MORITZ, Daily News Staff Writermoritzj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
Celebrating the Fourth of July comes with more dangers than just exploding fireworks. Today, in preparation for countless backyard barbecues, celebrations and the inevitable home-made fireworks display, Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers and representatives from the Philadelphia Fire Fighters and Paramedics Union held a press conference offering on summer safety tips. Here's their advice: Grilling When taking the grill out of winter storage, check for rust in the pan and signs of vermin or other pests.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I don't know what I'd do without Joe Ponessa, the Rutgers professor emeritus who, time after time, for as long as I have been writing this column, has stepped in to bail me out of my ignorance. This time, it's about cat urine, an issue that a reader asked about a few weeks back. Cat urine is an especially difficult contaminant to deal with, especially if it's a long-term problem, he says. While Ponessa is not sure anything would fully eliminate odors from long-term staining, there are a couple of easy things he suggests trying before resorting to some kind of coating.
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
VENTNOR, N.J. - Here's a riddle: Why did Mike Cunningham and Bob Shelley cart two grills, a smoker, a hundred pounds of charcoal, and 70 pounds of meat to the beach Saturday? Answer: Because they could. During one of only a scant number of weekends each summer, in one of the few Jersey Shore towns that ever permit barbecuing on the beach, the friends invited 40 or so other friends to celebrate Labor Day weekend eating on the sand. With the roar of the sea only steps away and the salty, consistent breeze presenting a bit of a fire-starting challenge, the two arrived at the New Haven Avenue beach by 8 a.m. to survey the situation and set up. They joined dozens of others up and down the beach barbecuing Saturday in the Ventnor section of an area south of Atlantic City known as Downbeach, which consists of the towns of Ventnor, Margate, and Longport.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
For the Yardley old-timers who've known this riverside luncheonette for nearly four decades as Charcoal Steaks n' Things, a go-to diner for pit-grilled burgers, turkey clubs, and Western omelets, the breakfast and lunch menus are still "safe. " After all, owner Anton "Tony" Plescha, who took two years to rebuild this institution (now elevated 10 feet above ground) after a devastating Delaware River flood in 2006, still happily mans the a.m. griddle. But when the dinner hour arrives and Plescha's executive-chef sons, Mark, 28, and Eric, 26, take over, the BYOB now known simply as Charcoal morphs into a kitchen of ultramodern ambition heretofore unexpected in this quaint Bucks County borough.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010
to burn off any food. Then turn off the heat and immediately scrub the grates again. Check drip pans. Empty and clean the large one that catches food monthly if you grill often (wear rubber gloves and wash with a scrubbing sponge and dishwashing liquid). The smaller, disposable one below it catches grease. Replace it with a new aluminum pan when it is half full. Just before grilling season, do a more thorough cleaning. Turn the burners on high, close the lid and let the grill run for 20 to 40 minutes, depending on how dirty it is. Turn the burners off when the residue has burned down to a white-gray ash that can be brushed away easily.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2007 | By APRIL LISANTE, lisanta@phillynews.com 215-854-5762
NEXT WEEK, grills everywhere will emerge from beneath their dusty covers, ready for service. Gas guzzlers, charcoal kings, heavenly hickory smokers - an army of cookers ready to do battle for Memorial Day, the official kickoff to the grilling season. But before you light up Old Faithful, even if you think you're a pro, take a backyard barbecue crash course - Sweet Lucy's style. In August 2003, little-known Sweet Lucy's Smokehouse duo Jim and Brooke Higgins walked away with top honors in the first Daily News Lunch Truck Competition.
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