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Chard

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FOOD
September 27, 1995 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Chard looks like spinach on steroids. With its brawny leaves and pumped-up stalks it is often confused with collard or kale or spinach. But chard has different roots. Chard is the leaf of a beet. Like other vegetables that share a common ancestry, beet roots and chard no longer come from the same plant. One has been cultivated to produce a huge bulbous root at the expense of its stems and leaves, and the other has robust foliage and swollen celery-thick stalks springing from a slender inedible root.
FOOD
November 12, 1989 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
The vegetable garden is about finished now, ready for its winter sleep, but there are still a few bright green spots, and the brightest of these, in my opinion, is chard. This hardy staple has been a pleasure since early summer, but I'm not tired of it yet. It's the universal, all-purpose green, and though it's often called a spinach substitute, this is perhaps an insult. Unlike spinach, it's quick to clean. Unlike spinach, it doesn't shrink so darned much. And chard, while it is as versatile as spinach, has a delicate flavor all its own. Only the youngest leaves are tender enough to eat raw, but cooked chard makes a delicious salad - just saute it lightly in olive oil, then dress with lemon juice and garlic.
FOOD
February 28, 2008 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
If you've been avoiding dark winter greens, assuming them too bitter, too tough, and too hard to digest, you are missing out on some delicious and highly nutritious foods. An old-fashioned, peasant image, and long cooking times, may have shadowed these dark leafy greens in the past, but they are now gracing menus at upscale restaurants all over town. And with good reason - they are among the most nutritious and popular vegetables worldwide. "Greens are not considered an elegant, rich food," said Althea Zanecosky, registered dietitian and regional spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 6 servings 1 tablespoon fresh    lemon juice 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 teaspooon sugar 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground    pepper 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 4 cups torn kale leaves 2 cups torn Swiss chard leaves 4 teaspoons unsalted pumpkin       seed kernels 1/4 cup sliced green onions 1 ounce shaved fresh pecorino    Romano cheese    (about 1/4 cup) 1. Combine first five ingredients, stirring until sugar dissolves.
FOOD
October 20, 2011 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
It's a complete meal. It's easy. It's fast. It's versatile. A frittata is one of the best choices for a fast weeknight meal. Think of frittatas as scrambled eggs with other ingredients mixed in. And finishing it under the broiler creates a delicious, lightly browned top, especially if you toss a bit of cheese on it before popping it in the oven. Chard and Sun-Dried Tomato Frittata Makes 6 servings 6 eggs 1/2 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme Salt and ground black pepper 1/4 cup chopped oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, plus a bit of oil from the jar 4 ounces sliced white button mushrooms 1 medium yellow onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 cups chopped chard 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1. Heat the broiler.
FOOD
February 28, 2008
Winter greens provide as much or more of the antioxidants and other beneficial phytonutrients that have led nutritionists to tag blueberries and such as superfoods. They also are a rich source of Vitamins A, C and K. But be aware that bitter greens with leaves that are larger and thicker will need more cooking time than other greens, usually about 10 minutes more. Chopping the greens into thin strips (about 1-inch width) can help speed the process. Stronger flavors can be toned down by adding vinegar, lemon or other citrus, garlic and/or hot peppers to the seasoning.
FOOD
May 8, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
When the five young men arrived for cooking class at Olney Elementary School, there was not one word of complaint from these middle schoolers - some pushing 6 feet tall - who had to squeeze into chairs meant for 5-year-olds. They donned their chef coats, washed up, took their seats around the table, opened their cookbooks, and took instruction from Joe Bradbury, a culinary instructor at Frankford High School, who volunteers with his wife, Che Che Bradbury, a teacher at Olney. The expansion of the My Daughter's Kitchen cooking program to Philadelphia and Camden schools was intended to teach more kids hands-on cooking skills while showing them how easy, tasty, and affordable healthy cooking can be. But what I saw when I visited this school in North Philadelphia was a dimension I never anticipated.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011
MY FAVORITE farmer's market is the Farm to City market held Saturdays at Rittenhouse Square. You'll find a great selection of fruit, veggies, cheeses, breads and desserts (I especially like the French-inspired Canele baked by Gil Ortale of Market Day). But people-watching is part of the pleasure and the customers at Rittenhouse Square's market are among the city's most fashionable. Some are dressed high style while others go for a more casual look as they survey the Swiss chard or sip fresh-pressed cider.
FOOD
November 5, 2009 | By Anna Herman FOR THE INQUIRER
I approach each season as an opportunity to feast on new flavors. So while I am sad to see fresh tomatoes and peppers leave my family's table (just as I am sad to see my summer tan fade), I am equally happy to enter into the heart of autumn's bounty. Rainbow chard; huge collards; tender spinach; delicate and crispy lettuces; purple, green, and savoy cabbages; brussels sprouts; cauliflower; broccoli; and various delightful potatoes are all still available from local fields and gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2011
_ They craft one of our city's most celebrated burgers, so it makes sense that Rob and Maggie Wasserman, owners of Rouge (205 S. 18th St., 215-732-6622), have created the first Philadelphia Burger Brawl, to benefit William M. Meredith Elementary School (725 S. 5th St.). Competing at the Queen Village school for various best-burger crowns will be chefs Marcie Turney, of Barbuzzo, Bindi and Lolita; Matt Levin, of Adsum; Jennifer Carroll, of 10Arts; London Grill; Daniel Stern, of Midatlantic and R2L; Chris Scarduzio, of Table 31; Butcher & Singer; Pub & Kitchen; Good Dog; North Third; Alfa; Royal Tavern; Ladder 15; PYT; Paesano's; and, of course, Rouge.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 8, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
When the five young men arrived for cooking class at Olney Elementary School, there was not one word of complaint from these middle schoolers - some pushing 6 feet tall - who had to squeeze into chairs meant for 5-year-olds. They donned their chef coats, washed up, took their seats around the table, opened their cookbooks, and took instruction from Joe Bradbury, a culinary instructor at Frankford High School, who volunteers with his wife, Che Che Bradbury, a teacher at Olney. The expansion of the My Daughter's Kitchen cooking program to Philadelphia and Camden schools was intended to teach more kids hands-on cooking skills while showing them how easy, tasty, and affordable healthy cooking can be. But what I saw when I visited this school in North Philadelphia was a dimension I never anticipated.
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 6 servings 1 tablespoon fresh    lemon juice 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 teaspooon sugar 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground    pepper 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 4 cups torn kale leaves 2 cups torn Swiss chard leaves 4 teaspoons unsalted pumpkin       seed kernels 1/4 cup sliced green onions 1 ounce shaved fresh pecorino    Romano cheese    (about 1/4 cup) 1. Combine first five ingredients, stirring until sugar dissolves.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's a beet, minus the root. Chard is a relative of the beet, but puts its energy into producing tender leaves and crunchy stalks instead of its root. Generally, any flavor that works well with spinach will partner with chard: butter, lemon, cream, garlic, shallots and vinaigrette. Try it in this easy quiche. Rainbow Chard, Bacon and Brie Quiche Makes 6 servings 1 prepared uncooked pie crust 8 ounces bacon, cut into small chunks 1 small yellow onion, diced 6 cups chopped rainbow chard (about ?
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Upscale veg­an eateries in the Philadelphia area have a dirty lit­tle se­cret: "I'd say at least two-thirds of our cli­en­tele are not veg­e­tar­i­an," says Ross Olchvary, chef-own­er at New Hope's Sprig & Vine . "I think most of them are just looking for some­thing dif­fer­ent. " Rich Lan­dau, chef and co-own­er of Center City's Vedge , with his wife, Kate Jacoby, has observed a sim­i­lar pat­tern. "With so many celebrities like Bill Clin­ton, Mike Ty­son, and El­len De­Gen­er­es talking about eating veg­an, peo­ple re­al­ize that it's not just some cleanse, and it's not some hip­pie-dip­py diet of steamed beans and len­til loaf.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011
MY FAVORITE farmer's market is the Farm to City market held Saturdays at Rittenhouse Square. You'll find a great selection of fruit, veggies, cheeses, breads and desserts (I especially like the French-inspired Canele baked by Gil Ortale of Market Day). But people-watching is part of the pleasure and the customers at Rittenhouse Square's market are among the city's most fashionable. Some are dressed high style while others go for a more casual look as they survey the Swiss chard or sip fresh-pressed cider.
FOOD
October 20, 2011 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
It's a complete meal. It's easy. It's fast. It's versatile. A frittata is one of the best choices for a fast weeknight meal. Think of frittatas as scrambled eggs with other ingredients mixed in. And finishing it under the broiler creates a delicious, lightly browned top, especially if you toss a bit of cheese on it before popping it in the oven. Chard and Sun-Dried Tomato Frittata Makes 6 servings 6 eggs 1/2 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme Salt and ground black pepper 1/4 cup chopped oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, plus a bit of oil from the jar 4 ounces sliced white button mushrooms 1 medium yellow onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 cups chopped chard 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1. Heat the broiler.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2011
_ They craft one of our city's most celebrated burgers, so it makes sense that Rob and Maggie Wasserman, owners of Rouge (205 S. 18th St., 215-732-6622), have created the first Philadelphia Burger Brawl, to benefit William M. Meredith Elementary School (725 S. 5th St.). Competing at the Queen Village school for various best-burger crowns will be chefs Marcie Turney, of Barbuzzo, Bindi and Lolita; Matt Levin, of Adsum; Jennifer Carroll, of 10Arts; London Grill; Daniel Stern, of Midatlantic and R2L; Chris Scarduzio, of Table 31; Butcher & Singer; Pub & Kitchen; Good Dog; North Third; Alfa; Royal Tavern; Ladder 15; PYT; Paesano's; and, of course, Rouge.
FOOD
November 5, 2009 | By Anna Herman FOR THE INQUIRER
I approach each season as an opportunity to feast on new flavors. So while I am sad to see fresh tomatoes and peppers leave my family's table (just as I am sad to see my summer tan fade), I am equally happy to enter into the heart of autumn's bounty. Rainbow chard; huge collards; tender spinach; delicate and crispy lettuces; purple, green, and savoy cabbages; brussels sprouts; cauliflower; broccoli; and various delightful potatoes are all still available from local fields and gardens.
FOOD
February 28, 2008
Winter greens provide as much or more of the antioxidants and other beneficial phytonutrients that have led nutritionists to tag blueberries and such as superfoods. They also are a rich source of Vitamins A, C and K. But be aware that bitter greens with leaves that are larger and thicker will need more cooking time than other greens, usually about 10 minutes more. Chopping the greens into thin strips (about 1-inch width) can help speed the process. Stronger flavors can be toned down by adding vinegar, lemon or other citrus, garlic and/or hot peppers to the seasoning.
FOOD
February 28, 2008 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
If you've been avoiding dark winter greens, assuming them too bitter, too tough, and too hard to digest, you are missing out on some delicious and highly nutritious foods. An old-fashioned, peasant image, and long cooking times, may have shadowed these dark leafy greens in the past, but they are now gracing menus at upscale restaurants all over town. And with good reason - they are among the most nutritious and popular vegetables worldwide. "Greens are not considered an elegant, rich food," said Althea Zanecosky, registered dietitian and regional spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.
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