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Chardonnay

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NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
I usually don't pay attention to celebrity wines. But the quality of some (see Wine Spectator's recent cover story on Sting's Tuscan wine, Il Palagio) has recently surged. The latest celeb vintner to make a splash will be familiar to college basketball fans. CBS sportcaster Jim Nantz, who's calling the Final Four and national championship game Monday, has put out a trio of surprisingly tasty Sonoma wines under the Calling label. The quality is no surprise, given that Nantz's partner, Peter Deutsch, is a veteran importer (CEO of W.J. Deutsch)
NEWS
April 14, 2013
Where there is pinot noir, great chardonnay will follow. That's true in Burgundy, the Continental homeland for the dynamic red-white duo. And it's true on the West Coast, too. Of course, California is best known for its fat and buttery chardonnays. But there's been a rising preference for the steely, mineral-laced, racy chards that food-lovers covet. And the best tend to come from cooler pinot zones like the Sonoma Coast and Oregon's Willamette Valley. Napa's Carneros, cooled by the sea breezes of the Petaluma Wind Gap, is also prime pinot territory.
FOOD
November 15, 1987 | By Ted Dziemianowicz, Special to The Inquirer
In an age when many Americans would turn chardonnay into an everyday wine, it's easy to lose track of those vintners who are striving to make it sublime. Sure, the $5 chardonnay has its place, as does any good wine at that price. The danger, though, is that blossoming oenophiles can mistakenly take these low-budget versions for the best that California has to offer. These days, there's no better way to sample the real thing than to round up some state-of-the-art chardonnays from Sonoma - California wine country's other valley.
NEWS
September 6, 1993 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jazz and wine or Shore traffic and mobs of people? For many at the third annual Chaddsford Winery jazz festival yesterday, jazz and wine were the obvious winners. "Does it beat the beach? You can't drink wine at the beach," said Kimberly Stanton of Stratford, N.J. About 700 visitors were greeted yesterday with the sounds of the Mike Falcone Jazz Group and a wine glass. The sight could have been the scene of an impressionist painting: People sitting on blankets, eating fruit and bread, drinking wine, and listening to the band in the brilliant afternoon sun. Al and Kathi Waters of Wilmington and their friend Heather Fox of Newark, Del., were ready for an afternoon of jazz.
NEWS
September 9, 2007
This Argentinian winery is known for its powerful and pricey red malbecs, but its entry-level chardonnay is also reliably one of the best-quality value whites in the world. It has enough buttery richness to let you know it's a chardonnay, but that decadence is elegantly balanced with a quenching tartness of green pear and lemon that keeps it singing with your food. The 2005 Catena Mendoza chardonnay costs $13.49 a bottle at Canals Discount Liquor Mart, 10 W. Route 70, Marlton, N.J., 856-983-4991.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | byline w, o email
STATE STORE PICK OF THE WEEK Cline Viognier North Coast California $11.99 PLCB Item No. 3006 If you like Chardonnay, chances are you'll LOVE viognier. It shares Chardonnay's framing qualities, in that it is usually dry and voluptuously full-bodied, full of juicy fruit flavor and not sharply acidic. Where it differs is in its aromatic profile. Chardonnay is relatively sedate in its buttered popcorn and apple pie flavors; viognier features an exuberant riot of tastes and smells - lychees and peaches, violets and muskmelons.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012 | Cheap Buzz
BUZZ: HEY, Marnie, my brother gave me a bottle of ice wine. I think it's from Alaska. Marnie: I doubt that, Buzz. Vines die if they freeze solid in winter. Wine grapes grow in "temperate" climates from 30 to 50 degrees in latitude. Buzz: OK, but if ice wine isn't from Alaska, I bet it comes from Chile. Chile, get it? Marnie: Good one. Funny you mention Chile — it stretches through all those latitudes and makes diverse wines as a result. Geography has a huge impact on wine style.
FOOD
July 16, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: Wine Smart Corkscrew Thermometer Manufacturer: Made in China for Brookstone Where: Brookstone Price: $25 Capitalizing on the popularity of Brookstone's combination thermometer-barbecue fork, the upscale tool company gives us a palm-size product that packs a corkscrew and wine temperature probe programmed with optimal serving temperatures for 11 types of wine. When the probe is inserted into a full bottle of wine, a button lights up to tell you if the wine is too warm, too cool or just right.
NEWS
May 6, 2007
'Barrel Monkeys' is an homage to Australia's cellar rats, the purple-tongued laborers in the mega-wineries of Down Under. The RedHeads cooperative studio in McLaren Vale has thankfully given 16 such monkeys an outlet to moonlight from their day jobs and let off some winemaking steam. And this aptly named Barrel Monkeys is one impressive result, a full-throttle screwcap shiraz that delivers a dark-fruit blast and licorice spice. A novel fermentation over chardonnay lees lends an extra touch of creaminess to soften the 15.5% alcohol kick.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally, Jon & Kate, unhitched As a big early Christmas present to us all, Kate and Jon Gosselin, once the stars of Jon & Kate Plus 8, a reality show based on their surreal lives, finalized their divorce yesterday in Norristown. The Hon. Arthur R. Tilson of Montgomery County Court handed down the mutually agreed no-faulter, based on "irretrievable breakdown. " Y'think? After 10 years of marital whatever, they blew up over the summer, and bam!, done. We couldn't agree more with Kate's sentiments: "I am very relieved that our divorce has been finalized.
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NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvanians may soon be able to buy their Thanksgiving turkey and a bottle of Chardonnay at the same store. In an unexpected vote Tuesday, the House approved a bill to let restaurants, hotels, and hundreds of grocery and convenience stores sell up to four bottles of wine to go. The measure cleared the Senate late last year, but languished untouched for six months. It hadn't even been included on the schedule of planned votes this week. Its passage, by a 157-31 vote, sends the bill to Gov. Wolf, giving him a high-stakes decision as he and the Republican-led legislature march toward a July 1 budget deadline.
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
I usually don't pay attention to celebrity wines. But the quality of some (see Wine Spectator's recent cover story on Sting's Tuscan wine, Il Palagio) has recently surged. The latest celeb vintner to make a splash will be familiar to college basketball fans. CBS sportcaster Jim Nantz, who's calling the Final Four and national championship game Monday, has put out a trio of surprisingly tasty Sonoma wines under the Calling label. The quality is no surprise, given that Nantz's partner, Peter Deutsch, is a veteran importer (CEO of W.J. Deutsch)
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
WHEN IT comes to making wine in North America, New Jersey was an early adopter. Before wine trails and growers' cooperatives, William Alexander and Edward Antill set out to prove that New Jersey wine could stand up to a bottle of vin from across the pond. The year was 1758, and a wine smackdown was issued by Great Britain's Royal Society: Any colonist who could produce a red or white as good as a French vintage would win 200 pounds - the equivalent of some 32,000 pounds today, or more than $49,000.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Columnist
Drink to me only with thine eyes? Today, we have better ideas - tech-minded gadgets for gulping, preserving, and improving our beverages. So make it one for my baby, and five more for the road. Takes a miracle: Turning water into wine still takes a biblical miracle. Improving the flavor of wine with the wave of a hand? Almost any mortal can do that, working an aeration device that fits between the wine bottle's mouth and the glass, infusing the flowing juice with air molecules to "open it up," improve flavor and aroma.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
BU ZZ: Hey, Marnie, are Pennsylvania wines any good? Everyone is pushing "local" these days, and that makes sense for beer or tomatoes, but when I think of local wine, I think of Chateau Luzerne. It tasted like the street corner it was made on, 3rd and Luzerne. Marnie: Buzz, you need to join the 21st century. Pennsylvania's wines are showing great potential these days. Last week, I helped judge a taste-off at Nectar restaurant, in Berwyn, between wines made in California and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
Where there is pinot noir, great chardonnay will follow. That's true in Burgundy, the Continental homeland for the dynamic red-white duo. And it's true on the West Coast, too. Of course, California is best known for its fat and buttery chardonnays. But there's been a rising preference for the steely, mineral-laced, racy chards that food-lovers covet. And the best tend to come from cooler pinot zones like the Sonoma Coast and Oregon's Willamette Valley. Napa's Carneros, cooled by the sea breezes of the Petaluma Wind Gap, is also prime pinot territory.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | byline w, o email
STATE STORE PICK OF THE WEEK Cline Viognier North Coast California $11.99 PLCB Item No. 3006 If you like Chardonnay, chances are you'll LOVE viognier. It shares Chardonnay's framing qualities, in that it is usually dry and voluptuously full-bodied, full of juicy fruit flavor and not sharply acidic. Where it differs is in its aromatic profile. Chardonnay is relatively sedate in its buttered popcorn and apple pie flavors; viognier features an exuberant riot of tastes and smells - lychees and peaches, violets and muskmelons.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012 | Cheap Buzz
BUZZ: HEY, Marnie, my brother gave me a bottle of ice wine. I think it's from Alaska. Marnie: I doubt that, Buzz. Vines die if they freeze solid in winter. Wine grapes grow in "temperate" climates from 30 to 50 degrees in latitude. Buzz: OK, but if ice wine isn't from Alaska, I bet it comes from Chile. Chile, get it? Marnie: Good one. Funny you mention Chile — it stretches through all those latitudes and makes diverse wines as a result. Geography has a huge impact on wine style.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finally, Jon & Kate, unhitched As a big early Christmas present to us all, Kate and Jon Gosselin, once the stars of Jon & Kate Plus 8, a reality show based on their surreal lives, finalized their divorce yesterday in Norristown. The Hon. Arthur R. Tilson of Montgomery County Court handed down the mutually agreed no-faulter, based on "irretrievable breakdown. " Y'think? After 10 years of marital whatever, they blew up over the summer, and bam!, done. We couldn't agree more with Kate's sentiments: "I am very relieved that our divorce has been finalized.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2009
BABES AND BEER go together like mud and wrestling - which is to say, it's a guy thing. Which, incidentally, explains why so many women reach for the grape instead of grain. Their first taste of suds came at a noisy high-school party where dull-witted boyfriends did keg stands and guzzled cheap suds from a bong. It was all about quantity: drink enough to work up the courage for back-seat sex. If that didn't leave a bad taste, then all those grimace-inducing, cleavage-enhanced Coors commercials sure did the trick.
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