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Charles Dickens

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NEWS
December 23, 1993 | By GEORGE F. WILL
The invention of modern Christmas got a boost 150 years ago from a book that begins with three unfestive words: "Marley was dead. " In 1843, Charles Dickens, that volcano of Victorian sentimentality, erupted with A Christmas Carol. Christmas was making a comeback. When Oliver Cromwell was Lord Protector he protected England from Christmas, which, Puritans said, was "an extraeme forgetfulnesse of Christ, by giving liberty to carnall and sensual delights. " Of course to Puritans, a fruitcake was a dangerous delight.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Jake Blumgart is a freelance writer and researcher in Philadelphia Charles Dickens has an unusually high profile in Philadelphia this year, especially for a long-dead author with a habit of churning out 800-page tomes. Anyone passing the Central Library of the Free Library will have noted its huge, multicolored Dickens banners. A smaller batch of the faithful has gleefully gathered to recite the great man's toasts in Center City pubs. This year is the 200th anniversary of Dickens' birth, hence much of the revelry.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2011 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
RYAN SEACREST ain't seen nothing like this. To kick off its Year of Dickens , the Free Library of Philadelphia will host "Dickens Idol" tonight, a cutthroat competition to find the best actor to embody literary great Charles Dickens at a bonanza of events planned for next year. The lucky doppelgänger will appear at many of the Free Library's Year of Dickens events, such as "A Dickens of a Christmas" along Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill; "Drinking with Dickens," during which fans can imbibe the same brews Dickens would have sipped; and performances of some of Dickens' better-known works.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | BY MORGAN MEIS, For the Daily News
THE YEAR OF DICKENS is coming to an end. The Free Library has been marking the famous author's 200th birthday with a variety of events throughout the year, continuing through December. December's activities have had a holiday theme, which is appropriate since Dickens pretty much invented Christmas - or at least the way we celebrate it these days. It's difficult to imagine Christmas without Ebenezer Scrooge, or Tiny Tim, or those ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come. Dickens' A Christmas Carol met widespread acclaim when it was published in 1843, and the public's love affair with the tale shows no signs of fatigue nearly 170 years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Layla A. Jones
Saturday Chanukah bowling Join the Chabad of Penn Wynne for a bowling Chanukah celebration. Enjoy pizza, unlimited bowling, and a bowling-pin menorah. Wynnewood Lanes, 2228 Haverford Rd., Ardmore. Admission: $10 in advance, $12 at the door. Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Info: 610-529-9011, www.chabadpennwynne.org . Saturday Winterfest in Center City Bring the entire family out to Sister Cities Park's first Winterfest. The festival will offer a sing-along with Frosty the Snowman, snowflake science presented by the Franklin Institute, and cookie decorating, among other activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Charles Dickens initially published his beloved comic novel The Pickwick Papers in serial form, and readers anticipated each new episode with the eagerness of Dallas fans. The sheer sprawl of the book and the huge cast of characters hardly made it congenial feature-film material. But there is a way around everything, as Noel Langley demonstrated with his amusing and engagingly acted 1953 version of The Pickwick Papers. Langley started bellowing "Cut!" before the cameras began rolling and managed to convincingly compress what was left.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
One minute, a desk and chair belonging to novelist Charles Dickens were sitting in the lobby, right next to a group of ficus trees and ferns. A moment later, the plants were still there, but the furniture was gone. A workman carting away the chair said it had been damaged while on display. The incident seemed to illustrate the makeshift character of the current exhibition at the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia. "Best of the Free Library's Collections" occupies the lobby and an adjacent gallery, but the only way you would know most of this is to ask. The exhibition's title was nowhere in evidence, and no signs indicated to lobby visitors that the display continued in a second room.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Just when you think you've reached your lifetime quota of Christmas Carols, along comes a genuinely original production. There are, currently, at least four professional productions of stage adaptations of Charles Dickens' famous story on the boards locally (and who knows how many others lurking in high school auditoriums and community theaters), plus the inevitable TV screenings of the movie versions. But the Christmas Carol at Mum Puppettheatre is a two-man, many-puppet show. Of course, it's still the same old story, of tightwad taskmaster Ebenezer Scrooge and the visits by three ghosts, as the cosmos stages some last-ditch attempt to save him from his own inhumanity.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
During the autumn of 1843, Charles Dickens confided to friends that he was working on a "little scheme. " It would be a short novel, published in a single volume rather than the usual monthly installments, and its theme would be the spirit of Christmas. When it was published in early December of that year, the Yuletide celebration would be forever changed. The book was "A Christmas Carol. " To commemorate the 150th anniversary of its publication, the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia is mounting an exhibit at the Central Library on Logan Square, "Charles Dickens and the Spirit of Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1987 | By Frank Wilson, Special to The Inquirer
There were . . . dances, and there were forfeits, and more dances, and there was cake . . . and there was a great piece of Cold Roast, and there was a great piece of Cold Boiled, and there were mince pies, and plenty of beer. - Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol If you were being given a free-association test, and the name of Charles Dickens were put to you, the words Victorian and Christmas would doubtless come to mind. Dickens was, after all, the greatest of the Victorian novelists and he wrote a good deal about Christmas, most notably A Christmas Carol, but also The Chimes and The Cricket on the Hearth.
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NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When spooky author Neil Gaiman was an 11-year-old boy in Portchester, England, he saw the great Welsh actor and dramatist Emlyn Williams do a one-man show as Charles Dickens, based on the author's tours of America. "He recited from Dickens' works, told bits of his stories about going from town to town, Philadelphia included - very dramatic," Gaiman says. "At the end, the audience felt - truly felt - as if Dickens had come alive and into focus for them in a way that was really enjoyable.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It cannot be a simple task, adapting Charles Dickens' Great Expectations for the stage, but playwright Gale Childs Daly gave it a go. A few nips and tucks later, the Arden Theatre Company's new production brings bright, young Pip, dismal Miss Havisham, and her ice-cold adopted daughter Estella (along with more than 30 others) to life with a six-person cast and minimal props. However, those reasonable cuts - even Dickens purists might not miss the excised personages and events - don't result in an entirely taut show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's heartening to know that even Charles Dickens, that pillar of Victorian virtue and civic responsibility, had his share of forbidden passions - and even succumbed to one. That would be the great author's adulterous love for Ellen "Nelly" Ternan, an actress 27 years his junior whom he met in 1857 when he was casting The Frozen Deep , a play he co-wrote with Wilkie Collins. A year later, the 45-year-old Dickens left his wife of 22 years, Catherine - ostensibly for the 18-year-old Nelly.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Whoa, Nelly. There's a tough scene in The Invisible Woman - the Ralph Fiennes -directed account of Charles Dickens' tumultuous affair with the actress Nelly Ternan - in which the famous Victorian scribe forces his wife to deliver a bracelet she had found, and presumed hers, to its intended recipient: Dickens' lover. It was a "weird act of cruelty," concedes Fiennes, who stars as Dickens, opposite Felicity Jones' Nelly, in the handsome period piece. Joanna Scanlan is Catherine Dickens , the sorry cuckquean (yes, cuckold has a female equivalent - thank you, OED!
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE TITLE character in "The Invisible Woman" is Charles Dickens' teen mistress and kept woman, and while she's not quite invisible, her place in society is apparent. Director Ralph Fiennes drives this idea home in a bleakly funny scene of Dickens (played by Fiennes) insisting, rather roughly, that the two of them take a lively public argument inside. A passing policeman sees the dispute, sees the older man towering over the distraught young woman, and says: "Is this woman bothering you, sir?"
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By George Will
Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol is a gooey confection of seasonal sentiment. It also is an economic manifesto. It concerned a 19th-century debate that is pertinent to today's argument about immigration. Last week, a disagreement between two conservative think tanks erupted when the Heritage Foundation excoriated the immigration reform proposed by a bipartisan group of eight senators. Heritage's analysis argues that making 11 million illegal immigrants eligible, more than a decade from now, for welfare-state entitlements would have net costs of $6.3 trillion over the next 50 years.
NEWS
December 25, 2012
By Dolores Lehr Charles Dickens has always been popular in Philadelphia. The city has its statue of this famous Victorian author where the Friends of Clark Park gather each February to celebrate his birthday. The "Dickens Village" at Macy's, moved from its former location in Strawbridge's, attracts large crowds of visitors every year during the Christmas holidays. The Philadelphia Free Library is concluding its yearlong celebration of the Dickens' Bicentenary (1812-2012), which has included monthly discussions of Dickens' works, displays of his letters and artifacts, and other festive events.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | BY MORGAN MEIS, For the Daily News
THE YEAR OF DICKENS is coming to an end. The Free Library has been marking the famous author's 200th birthday with a variety of events throughout the year, continuing through December. December's activities have had a holiday theme, which is appropriate since Dickens pretty much invented Christmas - or at least the way we celebrate it these days. It's difficult to imagine Christmas without Ebenezer Scrooge, or Tiny Tim, or those ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come. Dickens' A Christmas Carol met widespread acclaim when it was published in 1843, and the public's love affair with the tale shows no signs of fatigue nearly 170 years later.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
* MR. MAGOO'S CHRISTMAS CAROL. 8 p.m. Saturday, NBC 10. I USED TO BE a little embarrassed that my favorite Scrooge was Mister Magoo. The adult choice, I knew, was Alastair Sim, the Scottish actor whose 1951 portrayal of Ebenezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" is considered the gold standard for holiday-movie misers. Sim, who has one of the more entertaining entries on Wikipedia - really, you should check it out - is probably a worthier candidate than, say, Bill Murray, a fascinating actor whose "Scrooged" wasn't exactly one for the ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Layla A. Jones
Saturday Chanukah bowling Join the Chabad of Penn Wynne for a bowling Chanukah celebration. Enjoy pizza, unlimited bowling, and a bowling-pin menorah. Wynnewood Lanes, 2228 Haverford Rd., Ardmore. Admission: $10 in advance, $12 at the door. Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Info: 610-529-9011, www.chabadpennwynne.org . Saturday Winterfest in Center City Bring the entire family out to Sister Cities Park's first Winterfest. The festival will offer a sing-along with Frosty the Snowman, snowflake science presented by the Franklin Institute, and cookie decorating, among other activities.
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