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Charles Fambrough

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NEWS
January 4, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Charles Fambrough, 60, the Philadelphia-area jazz bassist and composer who earned an international reputation over a 40-year career as an elite sideman, performing with Wynton Marsalis, McCoy Tyner, Grover Washington Jr., and many others, died on Saturday, Jan. 1, of a heart attack. Mr. Fambrough died at his home in Allentown, his daughter Maria said Monday. He suffered from kidney failure and had been on dialysis for five years, she said. In December, the Philadelphia jazz community paid tribute to Mr. Fambrough at the Clef Club, at an event that he attended with his wife, Dolores.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Billed as a summit between Afro-Caribbean and jazz musicians, Friday's concert at the Painted Bride - produced by the Asociacion de Musicos Latino Americanos as part of the Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival - turned out to be a typically jumbled all-star affair that never hit its stride. There was plenty of the expected rapid-fire percussion, though rarely did the three drummers mesh into a unified ensemble. And the rhythm section - anchored by the agile jazz bassist Charles Fambrough - managed to spark a few episodes of juicy interaction.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When you think of jazz, places like New Orleans and Chicago probably come to mind. But when jazz greats Grover Washington Jr. and Charles Fambrough think about making their music, their thoughts often turn to Spring House. Yes. Spring House. Here, in a nondescript, stuccoed office, stuck between a dentist's office and a nail salon, sits the Morning Star recording studio. The company, based in the heart of Lower Gwynedd Township, is producing a number of jazz projects that are finding national audiences.
NEWS
November 17, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
It's a lonely street, North Broad Street. Stores stare blankly into the night, their doors locked, the window gates drawn. The sidewalks are empty. There's plenty of free parking. And then there's Jewel's, a single-story wooden building two blocks north of Spring Garden Street, at 679 N. Broad St. Brightly-colored, handpainted signs blanket the door and window. Music pours onto the street. Jewel's is a jazz club and bar. Until now, top-name musicians played there on Fridays and Saturday nights, usually for a $10 ticket.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Hard to figure why, but this weekend, there's a lot of jazz jumping in and around the city. From straight-ahead, to Latin, to soul jazz, to avant garde, there's an artist who'll fit your needs. The lineup: Friday: Percussionist Marlon Simon and the Nagual Spirits bring Latin jazz to the auditorium of Community College's Bonnell Building, on 17th Street just south of Spring Garden. Simon, a native of Venezuela, has worked with Dave Valentin, Charles Fambrough and Jerry Gonzales.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pianist Mulgrew Miller sees his role in any ensemble in a similar manner as a utility man might on a baseball team or as a backup point guard does in basketball. "I am a team player, and that is one of my strengths," he said. An unassuming statement from an unassuming person, which may seem a bit strange considering that Miller is one of the most in-demand musicians in all of jazz. If statistics have anything to do with it, Miller is more Bobby Abreu than Rob Ducey, more Allen Iverson than Kevin Ollie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the decades, the Mean Machine has been sort of a musical gatekeeper. If you were a Philly musician into jazz, funk and R&B in the 1970s, chances are you might have passed through this band. Legendary bassist Stanley Clarke did. In an interview last year, he said it was one of the first groups he played in as a young man in Germantown. It has been almost three decades since Clarke performed with the group, and the band is still alive and kicking. That is a source of pride for leader Andy Aaron, the trumpeter who founded the band in 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julian Pressley knows how to play the saxophone. He's a smart, erudite person, so he knows how to deal with the media. But when he put out Steppin', his first CD as a leader, Pressley had no idea he was going to have to spend so much time and energy, and learn so much, about the business of music and record promotion. "It's been crazy," Pressley said from his home in Chesilhurst, Camden County. "It's been crazy running around and promoting this record. " So far, the promotions have paid off. Pressley's record is ranked fifth on the jazz chart for the Gavin Report, a trade journal for radio and records.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1987 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
In jazz, this is a homecoming week of sorts. Pianist Kenny Barron, who was born in Philadelphia on June 9, 1943, is this weekend's attraction at Jewel's, 679 N. Broad St. Organist Jimmy Smith, born in Norristown on Dec. 8, 1925, is the headliner at Grendel's Lair Cabaret, 500 South St., on Monday. And trumpeter Ted Curson, born here on June 3, 1935, is guest with the house band at T'N'T Monroe's, 1433 Arch St., on Monday and Tuesday. Barron, just a teenager when he went on the road with Dizzy Gillespie in 1962, has been on the scene so long that it's something of a shock to realize that he's still in his early 40s. Frequently taken for granted as a result of his professionalism and consistency, just as Hank Jones and Tommy Flanagan have been, Barron is a sparkling and subtly inventive soloist.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just like the huge upright double bass that he plays, Charles Fambrough is built big, broad and bulky. And also like the bass, he emanates a full-bodied warmth, a presence that appears rock-solid and ever-steady. After toiling in the trenches for more than two decades, laying down bass lines for such esteemed musicians as Art Blakey, McCoy Tyner and Frank Sinatra, Fambrough, 43, has emerged as a leader. Part of the legacy of distinguished bassists that have hailed from Philadelphia, Fambrough will bring his quartet to Ursinus College for a concert on Wednesday.
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NEWS
January 4, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Charles Fambrough, 60, the Philadelphia-area jazz bassist and composer who earned an international reputation over a 40-year career as an elite sideman, performing with Wynton Marsalis, McCoy Tyner, Grover Washington Jr., and many others, died on Saturday, Jan. 1, of a heart attack. Mr. Fambrough died at his home in Allentown, his daughter Maria said Monday. He suffered from kidney failure and had been on dialysis for five years, she said. In December, the Philadelphia jazz community paid tribute to Mr. Fambrough at the Clef Club, at an event that he attended with his wife, Dolores.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The goal of a musician, said George Coleman, the esteemed tenor saxophonist, is not to make money. The goal of a musician, said this veteran sideman of Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and B.B. King, is not to appease critics. The goal of a musician, said Coleman, who will play Saturday night at Chris' Jazz Cafe, is simple: "The music is to be enjoyed, not analyzed. " Sometimes, he said, jazz musicians young and old spend too much time trying to satisfy critics or academics who applaud the esoteric.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
RENAISSANCE JAM 2000, 14th annual Cecil B. Moore Avenue Jazz/Blues Festival, Saturday, noon-8 p.m., on Cecil B. Moore Avenue between Broad and 18th streets. Mainstage: Moses Davis, noon; Clarence Beazley, 1:30; Jazz Planet, 3; Carol Harris, 4:30; Julian Pressley, 6. Info: 215-763-8996. Somebody pinch Julian Pressley and tell him he's not dreaming. "It's a little scary," said Pressley, a jazz alto saxophonist still a bit in awe of finding his debut CD "Steppin' Out" (JJP) on the national record charts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julian Pressley knows how to play the saxophone. He's a smart, erudite person, so he knows how to deal with the media. But when he put out Steppin', his first CD as a leader, Pressley had no idea he was going to have to spend so much time and energy, and learn so much, about the business of music and record promotion. "It's been crazy," Pressley said from his home in Chesilhurst, Camden County. "It's been crazy running around and promoting this record. " So far, the promotions have paid off. Pressley's record is ranked fifth on the jazz chart for the Gavin Report, a trade journal for radio and records.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pianist Mulgrew Miller sees his role in any ensemble in a similar manner as a utility man might on a baseball team or as a backup point guard does in basketball. "I am a team player, and that is one of my strengths," he said. An unassuming statement from an unassuming person, which may seem a bit strange considering that Miller is one of the most in-demand musicians in all of jazz. If statistics have anything to do with it, Miller is more Bobby Abreu than Rob Ducey, more Allen Iverson than Kevin Ollie.
NEWS
April 30, 1999 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Don Braden Quartet, 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sunday, Zanzibar Blue, Broad and Walnut streets. Tickets: $15. Info: 215-732-4500. If you're a fan of the TV show "Cosby" on CBS, chances are you've seen Don Braden's name dozens of times. If you haven't, Braden understands. During the show's closing credits, his name flies by in "eight nanoseconds," he said. But you undoubtedly heard his tenor saxophone roaring between the sitcom's scenes. For three seasons, Braden has been the show's composer, a post that helps pay the bills and created a friendship with the show's jazz-loving star, whom he calls "Dr. Cosby.
REAL_ESTATE
April 25, 1999 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Regency Woods, a townhouse community in Doylestown, has been home to Anthony and Lorraine Lestorti for 18 years. They occasionally have talked about buying a house, but each time they put the talk aside and remained in the townhouse they moved into when they were married. "For our lifestyle, this works out very well," said Anthony Lestorti, referring to the attractively landscaped two- and three-bedroom townhouses in the 156-unit Regency Woods complex. "We like it very much here and I can think of a number of reasons why. " Among the reasons Lestorti listed was Doylestown itself.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Hard to figure why, but this weekend, there's a lot of jazz jumping in and around the city. From straight-ahead, to Latin, to soul jazz, to avant garde, there's an artist who'll fit your needs. The lineup: Friday: Percussionist Marlon Simon and the Nagual Spirits bring Latin jazz to the auditorium of Community College's Bonnell Building, on 17th Street just south of Spring Garden. Simon, a native of Venezuela, has worked with Dave Valentin, Charles Fambrough and Jerry Gonzales.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the decades, the Mean Machine has been sort of a musical gatekeeper. If you were a Philly musician into jazz, funk and R&B in the 1970s, chances are you might have passed through this band. Legendary bassist Stanley Clarke did. In an interview last year, he said it was one of the first groups he played in as a young man in Germantown. It has been almost three decades since Clarke performed with the group, and the band is still alive and kicking. That is a source of pride for leader Andy Aaron, the trumpeter who founded the band in 1969.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
BLAKE AND BLAKE QUINTET. Zanzibar Blue, Broad and Walnut streets. 9 and 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: $15. Info: 215-732-4500. John Blake Jr. remembers the days when his young son would fall asleep, stereo headphones still pinned to his ears. This weekend the jazz violinist will appear with his drummer son, Johnathan, in the first public performance of the newly formed Blake and Blake Quintet. "He's become such a dynamic player, I figured I'd better work with him while I can," Blake said with a laugh.
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