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Charles Lindbergh

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NEWS
July 8, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene C. Zorn Jr. wasn't prone to exaggeration. He was a nationally recognized economist, a sober, no-nonsense man who dealt with facts and figures. So his son, Robert, was caught off guard when, in 1980, the elder Zorn offered an unusual preface before launching into a story: "After you hear this, you may think your old man's off his rocker. " "I was driving and my hands tightened on the steering wheel," Robert Zorn recalled. "He never referred to himself as my 'old man.' " His father then began a riveting tale that kept the 22-year-old Wharton School student up all night.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To update F. Scott Fitzgerald, Princeton University Class of 1917, "The rich - and famous - are not like you and me. " Just consider that box of old letters and papers you have stashed in the attic or in the back of the closet. The most you probably can hope for when you're dead and gone is that they will not end up in the recycling. Not so for Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Yesterday, Fitzgerald's old school held a news conference in a wood-paneled library room to "unseal" six boxes of letters, manuscripts and other documents that the couple gave to Princeton in 1941.
NEWS
December 4, 1986
On Nov. 19, the San Francisco Court of Historical Review, which has no legal power but which is composed of eminent jurists, met and called for reopening the case of Bruno Richard Hauptmann and the kidnap-murder of the Lindbergh child in 1932. The evidence, now set forth in two major books, two less-known books and a television documentary, establish that Hauptmann was at work in Manhattan the day of the kidnapping and picked up his wife at 8 in the evening. The 1932 trial was a farce and an outrage.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At 3:30 p.m. today, Princeton University will unseal six boxes containing writings by Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. The couple gave the university the letters, manuscripts and other documents in 1941 with the stipulation that they be read only after the Lindberghs' deaths. Author Anne Morrow Lindbergh died this year, 27 years after her husband, and the items are being made available to researchers. The university collection is a small portion of the Lindbergh material in archives around the country, but it is the first to be opened, said A. Scott Berg, a Princeton alumnus and trustee who wrote the 1998 biography Lindbergh.
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Whatever it is - a chamber musical? operatic vaudeville? - Take Flight at Princeton's McCarter Theatre is enthralling. Taking flight as its subject and legendary aviators as its characters, it tunefully explores obsession through the interwoven stories of the Wright Brothers, Charles Lindbergh, and Amelia Earhart. With a complicated book by John Weidman (no wonder the show kept reminding me of his Sondheim collaborations Pacific Overtures and Road Show), edgy music by David Shire, who saves soaring melody for when he really needs it, and Richard Maltby Jr.'s sometimes clever, sometimes thrilling lyrics, Take Flight is an exciting work.
NEWS
July 8, 1993
THE ULTIMATE HERO DEFIED THE TANKS We do not live in the age of heroes. This is not the era of Jefferson, Lincoln, Commodore Perry. Nor even of Charles Lindbergh. The politicians of our day seldom remind us of Franklin D. or Eleanor Roosevelt. Athletes signing $5-million and $10-million contracts do not resonate as did Babe Ruth. Joe Louis towers over today's men of the ring. I am not much of a hero worshiper. Too many years as a reporter have made me a skeptic. Perhaps this is why I seem drawn more to anti-heroes than to those who win the applause of the multitude.
NEWS
February 9, 2001
She lived out the fantasies of many a romantic schoolgirl: Meet and marry a gallant, handsome hero. Share with him soaring adventures, while still finding time to tend to your rich inner life. She lived through some of the worst nightmares a woman could fear. Have your firstborn child stolen from you in the dark of night, then murdered. Endure years of emotional abuse from a husband who proved as flawed as he was charismatic. Feel the lash of public opinion as it turns from adulation to scorn.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two Camden County College professors will retry the Lindbergh kidnapping case tonight and ask the audience to vote on the guilt or innocence of Bruno Richard Hauptmann, the man convicted in 1935. Each year, John L. Pesda, a history teacher at the Blackwood campus, and Robert Lorenzi, an English teacher at the school, give a crime- or supernatural-themed talk just before Halloween. "The Lindbergh Kidnapping: An American Tragedy" is open to the public and will begin at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Gabriel E. Danch Computer Integrated Manufacturing Center on the Blackwood campus.
NEWS
October 19, 1994 | by Jay Maeder, New York Daily News
In the end, Jersey Justice wore Anna Hauptmann down. She quietly passed away this week at 95, having finally abandoned her epic crusade to clear the name of the long-dead husband many historians believe wrongly paid for one of the nation's most enduringly lurid crimes. One of the few still-living links to the sensational 1932 kidnap-slaying of aviator Charles Lindbergh's baby son, Anna Hauptmann died in New Holland, Pa., on Oct. 10 - the 69th anniversary of her marriage to Bruno Richard Hauptmann of the Bronx.
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NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On March 1, 1932, the 20-month-old son of aviator Charles Lindbergh was kidnapped for ransom from the family's Hunterdon County mansion, in a crime that stunned the nation and remains the subject of doubt and speculation more than 80 years later. Now the PBS science program NOVA weighs in on the case, relying on behavioral science and forensics in an attempt to solve it. But as in past efforts, the program, scheduled to air 9 p.m. Wednesday on WHYY TV12, offers answers to some questions but raises others as well.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene C. Zorn Jr. wasn't prone to exaggeration. He was a nationally recognized economist, a sober, no-nonsense man who dealt with facts and figures. So his son, Robert, was caught off guard when, in 1980, the elder Zorn offered an unusual preface before launching into a story: "After you hear this, you may think your old man's off his rocker. " "I was driving and my hands tightened on the steering wheel," Robert Zorn recalled. "He never referred to himself as my 'old man.' " His father then began a riveting tale that kept the 22-year-old Wharton School student up all night.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
Trials of the century aren't what they used to be. Take the monthlong Casey Anthony murder trial in Florida. The mother, 25, has been charged with murdering her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee. Beginning long before sunrise, spectators - sometimes hundreds of them - line up outside the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando for the chance to be seated in the courtroom gallery. According to the Miami Herald and others, the rush for tickets routinely causes early-morning sprints and brawls.
NEWS
August 7, 2010
Charles Lindbergh and the Rise of American Aviation By Thomas Kessner Oxford University Press. 336 pp. $27.95 Reviewed by David Cohen If Charles Lindbergh had died young - a distinct possibility given how often the flier survived against impossible odds - he would have been remembered as one of America's greatest heroes. In May 1927 at the age of 25, the "Lone Eagle" flew from New York to Paris, a startling accomplishment that made the awkward, reticent aviator the world's best-known person.
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Whatever it is - a chamber musical? operatic vaudeville? - Take Flight at Princeton's McCarter Theatre is enthralling. Taking flight as its subject and legendary aviators as its characters, it tunefully explores obsession through the interwoven stories of the Wright Brothers, Charles Lindbergh, and Amelia Earhart. With a complicated book by John Weidman (no wonder the show kept reminding me of his Sondheim collaborations Pacific Overtures and Road Show), edgy music by David Shire, who saves soaring melody for when he really needs it, and Richard Maltby Jr.'s sometimes clever, sometimes thrilling lyrics, Take Flight is an exciting work.
NEWS
July 12, 2002 | By Thom Guarnieri INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seventy-four years ago tonight, a young aviator left Long Island heading home to Mexico City and flew straight into Burlington County history. Capt. Emilio Carranza, who was called the Charles Lindbergh of Mexico because of his aerial exploits, crashed in heavy rain in Tabernacle an hour after takeoff. His body was found the next day and taken to Mount Holly by members of American Legion Post 11, who stood guard until Mexican authorities arrived. Every year since, the post has staged a memorial "in honor of the goodwill between our two nations," said William Heller, who has been chairman of the event the last four years.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To update F. Scott Fitzgerald, Princeton University Class of 1917, "The rich - and famous - are not like you and me. " Just consider that box of old letters and papers you have stashed in the attic or in the back of the closet. The most you probably can hope for when you're dead and gone is that they will not end up in the recycling. Not so for Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Yesterday, Fitzgerald's old school held a news conference in a wood-paneled library room to "unseal" six boxes of letters, manuscripts and other documents that the couple gave to Princeton in 1941.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At 3:30 p.m. today, Princeton University will unseal six boxes containing writings by Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. The couple gave the university the letters, manuscripts and other documents in 1941 with the stipulation that they be read only after the Lindberghs' deaths. Author Anne Morrow Lindbergh died this year, 27 years after her husband, and the items are being made available to researchers. The university collection is a small portion of the Lindbergh material in archives around the country, but it is the first to be opened, said A. Scott Berg, a Princeton alumnus and trustee who wrote the 1998 biography Lindbergh.
NEWS
February 9, 2001
She lived out the fantasies of many a romantic schoolgirl: Meet and marry a gallant, handsome hero. Share with him soaring adventures, while still finding time to tend to your rich inner life. She lived through some of the worst nightmares a woman could fear. Have your firstborn child stolen from you in the dark of night, then murdered. Endure years of emotional abuse from a husband who proved as flawed as he was charismatic. Feel the lash of public opinion as it turns from adulation to scorn.
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