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Charles Taylor

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NEWS
April 3, 2013
Moses Blah, who served as Liberia's president for two months after Charles Taylor stepped down, has died. He was in his mid-60s. The Information Ministry said Mr. Blah died of a medical condition early Monday at John F. Kennedy Hospital in the capital, Monrovia. Mr. Blah had recently complained of heart troubles and sent out appeals for medical attention overseas. Mr. Blah was Liberia's vice president until Taylor stepped down on Aug. 11, 2003. A former ambassador to Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia, Mr. Blah served for two months as president and then handed power over to transitional head of state Charles Gyude Bryant, who conducted the 2005 post-conflict presidential and general elections.
NEWS
August 14, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Thousands of civilians and gunmen pillaged oil and sacks of grain from Monrovia's port yesterday, ahead of the rebel troops' promised withdrawal, and the United States pledged 200 troops to bolster West African peacekeepers. A ship laden with humanitarian aid bobbed offshore, ready to deliver food and supplies to civilians starving and facing disease in the besieged capital, where many have subsisted on leaves. The U.S. force would be the largest sent ashore despite international pressure for the Bush administration to help the war-torn West African nation, founded in the 19th century by freed American slaves.
NEWS
July 5, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Embattled Liberian President Charles Taylor offered yesterday to step down - with conditions - as President Bush directed the Pentagon to explore the possibility of sending U.S. troops to the war-torn West African country. Responding to international pressure for his resignation, Taylor offered to leave power, but only after international peacekeepers had arrived in Liberia. Bush has insisted on Taylor's resignation as the first step toward a possible deployment of U.S. forces.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | Daily News wire services
MEXICO CITY 'MOST WANTED' DIES IN SHOOTOUT A gang leader who was wanted for 67 killings was killed in a shootout with police near Mexico City, the federal police chief said yesterday. Jose Bernabe Cortes Mendoza, nicknamed El Marino, or "the sailor," was killed Wednesday night at Los Reyes La Paz, a suburb three miles southeast of Mexico City, said Chief Rodolfo Leon Aragon. Cortes, who escaped jail last year, was sought in more than 50 bank robberies, said Aragon.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Two Nigerian warships captured a gunboat carrying weapons for forces loyal to Liberian rebel leader Charles Taylor, a spokesman for West African forces trying to end Liberia's civil war said yesterday. Lt. Col. John Dungs of the multinational force said the two Nigerian warships seized the gunboat Sunday. A Ghana news agency correspondent traveling with the multinational force reported 27 rebels were captured when the gunboat, a converted trawler, was seized as it was approaching two Nigerian frigates.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - Former Liberian president Charles Taylor deserves an 80-year sentence for the war crimes he was convicted of last week, including aiding and abetting murder and rape on a mass scale, prosecutors said in a written filing Thursday. Judges at the Special Court for Sierra Leone ruled April 26 that Taylor played a crucial role in helping rebels continue a bloody rampage during that West African nation's 11-year civil war, which ended in 2002 with more than 50,000 dead. They found Taylor guilty of 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity for his role in arming the Sierra Leone rebels in exchange for "blood diamonds" mined by slave laborers and smuggled across the border.
NEWS
July 15, 2003 | Charles Krauthammer
It was the left that led the opposition to war in Iraq. Now it is the left that is most strenuous in urging intervention in Liberia. Curious. No blood for oil, it seems, but blood for Liberia. And let us not automatically assume that Liberia will be an immaculate intervention. Sure, we may get lucky and suffer no casualties. But Liberia has three warring parties, tons of guns and legions of desperate fighters. Yet pressure is inexorably building to send American troops to enforce a peace.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Dear Mr. McKinney: Some weeks ago, I wrote to thank you for a column that was headlined "Why No Outrage?" about the massacre by government troops of at least 600 innocent civilians who had sought refuge from Liberia's civil war in a Lutheran church. At the time, you explained how innocent Liberians were trapped in a vicious triangle consisting of the government troops of President Sam Doe and rival rebel forces of Charles Taylor and Prince Yormie Johnson. (In fact, that was the first and only time I've seen Prince Johnson referred to by a first name!
NEWS
August 12, 2003
Say good-bye, Charles. Don't come back soon - don't come back at all. Everyone can cheer the end of Charles Taylor's reign as president of Liberia. He left yesterday - the office and the country - after months of pressure from the United States, African nations, and the United Nations. Let there be cheers because he no longer will be the fulcrum of instability in his West African neighborhood. Let there be cheers because Liberians have suffered since late 1989, when Taylor started a civil war to oust fellow strongman Samuel Doe. Let there be cheers because the boys of Liberia may no longer be forced into serving in the military before they have a childhood.
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NEWS
April 3, 2013
Moses Blah, who served as Liberia's president for two months after Charles Taylor stepped down, has died. He was in his mid-60s. The Information Ministry said Mr. Blah died of a medical condition early Monday at John F. Kennedy Hospital in the capital, Monrovia. Mr. Blah had recently complained of heart troubles and sent out appeals for medical attention overseas. Mr. Blah was Liberia's vice president until Taylor stepped down on Aug. 11, 2003. A former ambassador to Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia, Mr. Blah served for two months as president and then handed power over to transitional head of state Charles Gyude Bryant, who conducted the 2005 post-conflict presidential and general elections.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Julie Shaw and Daily News Staff Writer
A BLOODY, amputated arm and leg lie amid the rocks near a stream in Overbrook's Morris Park, as Liberian refugees trudge barefooted amid rebels shouting and waving guns. One woman is shot to death by a rebel. Another is raped. The scene — in a movie written, directed and produced by Prinze Whyee, a Liberian refugee who now lives in Philly — re-creates horrors Whyee saw or heard as a child fleeing his home in Monrovia, Liberia, and walking with strangers toward the Ivory Coast.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - Former Liberian president Charles Taylor deserves an 80-year sentence for the war crimes he was convicted of last week, including aiding and abetting murder and rape on a mass scale, prosecutors said in a written filing Thursday. Judges at the Special Court for Sierra Leone ruled April 26 that Taylor played a crucial role in helping rebels continue a bloody rampage during that West African nation's 11-year civil war, which ended in 2002 with more than 50,000 dead. They found Taylor guilty of 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity for his role in arming the Sierra Leone rebels in exchange for "blood diamonds" mined by slave laborers and smuggled across the border.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles H. Taylor was having lunch at his Center City eatery with actress Julie Harris when a poignant moment intruded. The pianist on duty realized that Harris had starred in the film East of Eden with the troubled James Dean, who died in 1955, the year the film was released. "He shifted into the music from East of Eden , and she began to cry," Mr. Taylor told an Inquirer interviewer in 1988, suggesting that Harris was comfortable enough to show emotion with him. Though a small lunch place, Taylor's Country Store had its fans, even some marquee names.
NEWS
September 24, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
While winter still lay heavily on the land, Charles F. Taylor Jr. would scan his yard for the new year's first signs of plant life. "Every morning, he would look out from the family room," said his wife, Mary Jo. The couple loved their witch hazel tree, whose yellow flowers appeared even before crocuses in late January or early February. "One of his greatest pleasures," she said, "was seeing the witch hazel bloom. " He had good reason to know his early bloomers. Dr. Taylor, 68, of Lansdowne, was a research horticulturist at Longwood Gardens from 1973 to 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2008 | This review originally appeared Wednesday. By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
They had had enough, watching their not-yet-teenage sons armed with weapons, incited to kill. Seeing their daughters raped and terrorized. Being raped, beaten, threatened. A testament to the determination and wisdom of a group of Liberian women who banded together in 2003 to stop a civil war and bring peace to their West African nation, Pray the Devil Back to Hell is at once inspiring and horrific. Inspiring, because it shows what people can do, people resolved to bring about change.
NEWS
November 26, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
They had had enough, watching their not-yet-teenage sons armed with weapons, incited to kill. Seeing their daughters raped and terrorized. Being raped, beaten, threatened. A testament to the determination and wisdom of a group of Liberian women who banded together in 2003 to stop a civil war and bring peace to their West African nation, Pray the Devil Back to Hell is at once inspiring and horrific. Inspiring, because it shows what people can do, people resolved to bring about change.
NEWS
March 15, 2007 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The John Templeton Foundation yesterday awarded its annual Templeton Prize for progress in religion and spirituality to Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor. Taylor, 75, has written extensively on how the notion of self evolved in Western culture, with particular attention to the modern search for meaning in an increasingly secular culture. In awarding the $1.5 million prize, foundation president John M. Templeton Jr. noted that Taylor throughout his career had "staked an often lonely position that insists on the inclusion of spiritual dimensions in discussions of public policy, history, linguistics, literature and every other facet of humanities and social sciences.
NEWS
March 10, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Talk about a career change. Beatrice Munah Sieh is making the leap from schoolteacher in Trenton to central figure in the rebuilding of a war-torn African nation. Today is Munah Sieh's last day at Grace A. Dunn Middle School, where she has taught special education for six years. In a few weeks, she will start her new job - as Liberia's first female chief of police. Huh? "It was shocking," said Jermaine Kamau, a vice principal at Dunn. It's not as crazy as it sounds.
SPORTS
October 13, 2005 | By Don Beideman, Inquirer Suburban Staff Writer
Once opponents when they played soccer, Ralph Elliott and King Saah became further acquainted with each other in 1994 when Saah moved to Elliott's neighborhood and they began playing together. "We've continued our friendship from there," Elliott said. The two have a lot in common besides their friendship and mutual love of soccer, however. The pair, both about 5-foot-8, 150 pounds, first met in the Ivory Coast, where their families settled after fleeing the 14-year civil war in neighboring Liberia.
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