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Charles Willson Peale

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NEWS
October 7, 2012
After extensive renovations, the Philadelphia History Museum, at 15 S. Seventh St., has reopened and among the exhibitions is "Face to Facebook," a look at how Philadelphians have pictured themselves from the 17th century to now. Match up the notable Philadelphian with his or her portrait. To learn more about the museum, visit www.philadelphiahistory.org or call 215-685-4830. Answers below. 1. William Penn. 2. Harriet Lee Smith. 3. Charles Willson Peale. 4. George Washington.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
If there was ever an American who symbolized the ideal family man, it was early Philadelphia artist Charles Willson Peale, father of 17 spoiled and very talented kids. "The First Family of Art" is the title of the Philadelphia Museum of Art show now drawing thousands to view the paintings of three generations of Peales. Publicity for the art show emphasizes Peale's tender portrayal of family life, including his own family. No one ever disputed Peale's reputation as a loving and doting daddy - until art historian Phoebe Lloyd dropped a bombshell.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Michaels, who lives in Secaucus, N.J., places his ear against the funny-looking wooden contraption and sits stiller than any 8-year-old boy ought to be expected to sit. But it's only for a minute, while Mark Jones traces his profile. Then, voila! A silhouette, of the kind that the celebrated American painter Charles Willson Peale and his black servant (later free citizen) Moses Williams used to produce on the original physiognotrace. That's what the funny-looking contraption is called - although, as Jones tells visitors, Peale's painter son and favorite pupil Raphaelle used to call it the face-a-tracer.
NEWS
October 23, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
In 1819, Charles Willson Peale headed down to Washington to paint portraits of President James Monroe, Henry Clay, and other dignitaries for exhibition in the famed Peale museum located in Independence Hall. But there was another sitter the painter wanted to snare on his trip. "I heard of a Negro who is living in Georgetown said to be 140 years of age," Peale wrote in his diary. "He is comfortable in his Situation having Bank stock and lives in his own house. " The man was Yarrow Mamout, a free African, a Muslim who indeed held bank stock, purchased with great effort to secure a comfortable old age - after a life of abduction and bondage.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
Benjamin Randolph was one of the most famous Philadelphia colonial craftsmen - he made the lap desk on which Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of Independence. But no one knew what the cabinetmaker looked like until Timothy Westbrook walked into the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the spring with Randolph's portrait, a miniature by Charles Willson Peale. Westbrook gave the portrait to the museum. "I felt I did the right thing bringing the miniature back to Philadelphia, where it started out," he said in a phone interview from his Rochester, N.Y., home.
NEWS
August 24, 1986 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
Young people have a way with the language. They can condense a century or more of human bang bang into a few choice words, words so choice that they sum up a happening with great humor and dispatch. It happened at La Salle University, at 20th and Olney, where the Christian Brothers have been shaping young minds since 1926, the year they bought a tract of the old "Belfield farm," the founding site of the Germantown Cricket Club in 1854, for a new campus. Now, more than a half-century later, Brother Patrick Ellis, the La Salle president who is long on vision, has bought the last 8 1/2 acres of the property, including the historic Charles Willson Peale house, once the home and studio of the prolific portrait artist of the Revolutionary era. And when word of the transaction hit the La Salle campus, the students, ever eager to encapsulize any and all news items, summed up the deal in terse and concise humor.
NEWS
November 1, 1996 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
THE PEALE FAMILY: CREATION OF AN AMERICAN LEGACY, 1770-1870. Philadelphia Museum of Art, 26th Street and the Parkway, Sunday through Jan. 5. Tickets: $7 (discounts available). Info: 215-684-7860. If the 18th-century gent known as Charles Willson Peale had been a road-builder, Philadelphia would have had the best highways in the nation. His company - he might have called it "C.W. Peale and Family, Streetmakers" - would have consisted of Peale, a number of his children, a younger brother and, later, some nieces and a nephew.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
On Nov. 25, Cape Cod auctioneer Robert C. Eldred walked into the Chestnut Hill branch of First Pennsylvania Bank to claim a box of silver that had been consigned to him for sale. Inside the box, however, he found something else: a large portrait of colonial astronomer David Rittenhouse, painted in the early 1790s by Charles Willson Peale. The Peale painting was not all that Eldred acquired in Philadelphia that day. At Quaker Moving & Storage Co., he picked up a set of mahogany dining chairs; a pair of elaborately carved side chairs, also mahogany; a big box of color-plate books; and two paintings by Daniel Garber, a New Hope impressionist from the first quarter of the century.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
One of the earliest formal portraits of an African American - a well-known oil painting of a kufi-wearing free black man painted by Charles Willson Peale in 1819 - has been sold by the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The striking portrait of Yarrow Mamout, an elderly Muslim and former slave living in Washington, is the most recent in a string of art and artifact sales made by the history museum,...
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
One of the earliest formal portraits of an African American - a well-known oil painting of a kufi-wearing free black painted by Charles Willson Peale in 1819 - has been sold by the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The striking portrait of Yarrow Mamout, an elderly Muslim and former slave living in Washington D.C., is the most recent in a string of art and artifact sales made by the history museum,...
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NEWS
October 7, 2012
After extensive renovations, the Philadelphia History Museum, at 15 S. Seventh St., has reopened and among the exhibitions is "Face to Facebook," a look at how Philadelphians have pictured themselves from the 17th century to now. Match up the notable Philadelphian with his or her portrait. To learn more about the museum, visit www.philadelphiahistory.org or call 215-685-4830. Answers below. 1. William Penn. 2. Harriet Lee Smith. 3. Charles Willson Peale. 4. George Washington.
NEWS
October 23, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
In 1819, Charles Willson Peale headed down to Washington to paint portraits of President James Monroe, Henry Clay, and other dignitaries for exhibition in the famed Peale museum located in Independence Hall. But there was another sitter the painter wanted to snare on his trip. "I heard of a Negro who is living in Georgetown said to be 140 years of age," Peale wrote in his diary. "He is comfortable in his Situation having Bank stock and lives in his own house. " The man was Yarrow Mamout, a free African, a Muslim who indeed held bank stock, purchased with great effort to secure a comfortable old age - after a life of abduction and bondage.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
One of the earliest formal portraits of an African American - a well-known oil painting of a kufi-wearing free black man painted by Charles Willson Peale in 1819 - has been sold by the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The striking portrait of Yarrow Mamout, an elderly Muslim and former slave living in Washington, is the most recent in a string of art and artifact sales made by the history museum,...
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
One of the earliest formal portraits of an African American - a well-known oil painting of a kufi-wearing free black painted by Charles Willson Peale in 1819 - has been sold by the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The striking portrait of Yarrow Mamout, an elderly Muslim and former slave living in Washington D.C., is the most recent in a string of art and artifact sales made by the history museum,...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2010 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
Charles Willson Peale's paintings are revered by many. His works have been well published, exhibited, and collected by major museums. Among them are the many oil portraits of our new nation's founding fathers, most of whom he knew quite well. Peale displayed those likenesses in America's first natural history museum, which he founded in Philadelphia. Now we welcome at La Salle University a different sort of Peale exhibit, "Charles Willson Peale and His Family at Belfield. " This small jewel of a show celebrates the bicentennial of Peale's leaving Center City at age 69 in 1810 for country living at a 104-acre Germantown farm, Belfield (now 20th and Olney)
NEWS
November 9, 2005 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
NOW THAT BEN Franklin's 300th birthday celebration is just around the corner, Philadelphia has planned a celebration that will feature a traveling exhibit, storytelling, walking tours, a ballet and a performance by the Philadelphia Orchestra, among other star-spangled events. Of course, each of these festivities will highlight the more noble characterizations of Franklin that have become steeped in three centuries of folklore: "printer," "writer," "scientist," "inventor," "civic leader," "diplomat" and "Founding Father.
NEWS
December 1, 2004 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than two years ago, a visitor to the historic Second Bank of the United States - one of the keystones of Independence Park - was welcomed by crumbling plaster, swaths of peeling paint, and seeping water. Secretary of the Interior Gale Norton was appalled to the point of tears when she toured the venerable neoclassical building in 2001. In August 2002, the bank shut down for long-postponed roof repairs; heating, air conditioning and electrical work; interior renovations; and new access for the handicapped.
NEWS
November 25, 1996 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
If there was ever an American who symbolized the ideal family man, it was early Philadelphia artist Charles Willson Peale, father of 17 spoiled and very talented kids. "The First Family of Art" is the title of the Philadelphia Museum of Art show now drawing thousands to view the paintings of three generations of Peales. Publicity for the art show emphasizes Peale's tender portrayal of family life, including his own family. No one ever disputed Peale's reputation as a loving and doting daddy - until art historian Phoebe Lloyd dropped a bombshell.
NEWS
November 1, 1996 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
THE PEALE FAMILY: CREATION OF AN AMERICAN LEGACY, 1770-1870. Philadelphia Museum of Art, 26th Street and the Parkway, Sunday through Jan. 5. Tickets: $7 (discounts available). Info: 215-684-7860. If the 18th-century gent known as Charles Willson Peale had been a road-builder, Philadelphia would have had the best highways in the nation. His company - he might have called it "C.W. Peale and Family, Streetmakers" - would have consisted of Peale, a number of his children, a younger brother and, later, some nieces and a nephew.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Through the 18th century, history painting was considered the noblest form of art. This misnamed genre didn't really concern itself with history as we understand the word, but with idealizing human behavior. History painters looked to the ancient world and to Christian iconography for their models - this was one meaning of the term "history. " In their practice, classical myth, religious doctrine and the examples set by great leaders and thinkers were transformed into visual paragons of human conduct.
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