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Charlie Chaplin

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NEWS
June 19, 2013
Helen Brush Jenkins, 94, a pioneering photojournalist who made Life magazine when she snapped a photo of her child moments after giving birth, has died. Her daughter, Genji Leclair, told the Los Angeles Times that Ms. Jenkins died Wednesday at her home in Chicago, days after suffering a stroke. Ms. Jenkins became a photographer for the now-defunct Daily News in Los Angeles in the 1940s at a time when few women held such jobs. Over more than a dozen years, she snapped Eleanor Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and stars such as Charlie Chaplin, Clark Gable, and John Wayne.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
A Woman of Paris (1923), one of Charlie Chaplin's first features, is rare among his films. It is not a comedy, nor does it star the director. An unusually poignant tragedy of misunderstandings, it boasts more ironies than a De Maupassant short story. It stars Edna Purviance (then Chaplin's lover) as a jilted farm girl who goes to Paris and seeks her fortune in the demimonde as Adolphe Menjou's mistress. An underseen gem. At 7 and 9:15 tonight and tomorrow night at Temple University Cinematheque, 1619 Walnut St. TEMPLE CINEMATHEQUE 1619 Walnut St., 787-1529.
NEWS
January 2, 1993
Don't know about you, but the worst thing for us in being curious about the sex habits of the mighty and dreadful has always been the threat that you might find out. Think about it. Do you really want to know about the secret moments of John Sununu? Jeanne Kirkpatrick? Richard Nixon? The three of them together? So Queer Nation's attempt to "out" the secretary of health and human services as a lesbian seems an exercise akin to making assertions about Rush Limbaugh's laundry practices.
NEWS
March 5, 1996 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
So here's this onetime Saturday matinee fanatic sitting down to coffee and cookies in the "majestic without being overwhelming" home of Gregory Peck gathering material for a biography on one of Hollywood's revered legends. "To see this hero, this star . . . I couldn't believe it," said Gerry Molyneaux. "What a jolt. " How did Molyneaux finagle such a jolting moment? The same way he got to write the lives of film icons James Stewart and Charlie Chaplin. "Luck, persistence and stuff," Molyneaux says, smiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Try these headlines: "STOCKS CRASH, PANIC FOLLOWS," "BANKS FAIL, RIOTS ENSUE. " Who would have thought the rerelease of Charlie Chaplin's darkly comic Monsieur Verdoux would be so terrifyingly timely? From a story idea by Orson Welles, Monsieur Verdoux is the tale of a bank clerk (Chaplin) who loses his job during the Great Depression and crafts a new career as a bigamist serial killer - he marries women with money, murders them, and lives off the proceeds. An opening scene that is stiff, stagy, and a setup for the plot to come is pretty much the only flaw in this sly, existential black-and-white classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In continuing defiance of those who claim the screen biography is dead, Richard Attenborough has forged much of his high reputation as a director from the lives of great men. He thrives on epic vistas, but it was reasonable to wonder whether even his big canvas was vast enough to do justice to the story of Charlie Chaplin. Faced with the challenge of Chaplin, a less ambitious filmmaker probably would have decided that less could be more and concentrated on one segment in a turbulent, fascinating and profoundly influential life that would stretch the capacity of a 10-part miniseries.
LIVING
December 16, 1993 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Jackson has come home to a firestorm, and his legal mess isn't even the half of it. It's those red-hot flames of public scandal that have reduced so many careers to ashes that Jackson should fear most. They are relentless, fanned by every move, every headline, every innuendo. And if the scorching heat hasn't already melted Jackson's image beyond repair, he can only hope that his career can survive what others' haven't. Gossip. Allegations. No matter what the truth may be, scandal itself has killed countless careers and mangled many once-flawless reputations.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | BY FREDERIC MORTON, From the New York Times
He was a tramp in the big city, using a park bench for a bed. He wore a weathered black derby and a frock coat askew on his shoulders - both tragicomic attempts at respectability. He drifted along the sidewalks, without family. He had no friends. Acquaintances saw him go into strange fits and thought him a clown. But he became a charismatic clown - the center of a show he perfected and in which he functioned not just as leading man but as writer, director, producer and set designer.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | By NEIL A. GRAUER
One hundred years ago tomorrow, a tramp who would conquer the world was born. Charlie Chaplin was probably the greatest figure in the history of American motion pictures. With the possible exception of Mickey Mouse, no image in the iconography of American film reached farther or entertained more people than Chaplin's Little Tramp. Nowadays, the appellation "superstar" is bestowed recklessly on performers whose greatest attribute may only be hyperactive publicists. But as Alistair Cooke noted in his 1977 book, Six Men, "in our century, more people have come out everywhere to catch a glimpse of Charlie Chaplin than for any other human in history . . . Through the 1920s and 1930s, Chaplin was the most famous man on earth.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Jay Schwartz has been screening his personal collection of 16mm films for Philadelphia audiences since 1992. The first showings were at the Khyber Pass Pub in Old City, back when it was a grungy punk-rock bar. Since then he's ranged all over the city, from coffeehouses to, for the first time this year, the Art Museum. Schwartz is a lifelong resident of the city, growing up in the Northeast and now a resident of South Philly. He began collecting films in the pre-VHS dark ages, when the only chance to catch an old movie was on late-night TV or during a rare silver-screen rerelease.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
J ET MAGAZINE, which first hit newsstands in 1951 to cover issues impacting African-Americans, is ceasing regular print publication and going all digital. Johnson Publishing, which owns both Jet and Ebony , says the switch will occur at the end of next month. The Chicago-based company says the move is a proactive effort to adapt to its readers' growing desires for quicker and easier access to information. Jet , conceived by Johnson Publishing founder John Johnson , publishes every three weeks, but will soon be able to update every three seconds.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
Helen Brush Jenkins, 94, a pioneering photojournalist who made Life magazine when she snapped a photo of her child moments after giving birth, has died. Her daughter, Genji Leclair, told the Los Angeles Times that Ms. Jenkins died Wednesday at her home in Chicago, days after suffering a stroke. Ms. Jenkins became a photographer for the now-defunct Daily News in Los Angeles in the 1940s at a time when few women held such jobs. Over more than a dozen years, she snapped Eleanor Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and stars such as Charlie Chaplin, Clark Gable, and John Wayne.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the new musical Chaplin , which is every bit as entertaining as Charlie Chaplin himself, Rob McClure portrays the film genius with an irresistible sweetness, like candy you can't - and don't want to - stop eating. In that, of course, he mirrors the Chaplin film persona perfectly. And so does the show, which itself comes off looking like a movie from the pre-talkie years. Most of the evening is costumed by Amy Clark and the late Broadway designer Martin Pakledinaz, in remarkably varied shades of black, white and gray.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Try these headlines: "STOCKS CRASH, PANIC FOLLOWS," "BANKS FAIL, RIOTS ENSUE. " Who would have thought the rerelease of Charlie Chaplin's darkly comic Monsieur Verdoux would be so terrifyingly timely? From a story idea by Orson Welles, Monsieur Verdoux is the tale of a bank clerk (Chaplin) who loses his job during the Great Depression and crafts a new career as a bigamist serial killer - he marries women with money, murders them, and lives off the proceeds. An opening scene that is stiff, stagy, and a setup for the plot to come is pretty much the only flaw in this sly, existential black-and-white classic.
NEWS
July 5, 2007 | By Ken Alan FOR THE INQUIRER
Singer/songwriter Lauren Hart is no stranger to the musical scene, and for years, she has been a perennial performer along the local club circuit. From Philadelphia's World Caf? Live to Phoenixville's Steel City Coffee House, her melodic vocals have soared from sound systems throughout the Philadelphia area. In early June, Hart was back on stage at one of her favorite area venues: Chaplin's The Music Cafe in Spring City, certainly a bit more off-the-beaten path than some of the other better-known sites she plays.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Visitors to the Broadway Theatre tonight will be treated to the sounds of a musical giant, brought back to life after a quarter-century of silence. During the prime of the Broadway Theatre in the 1920s and '30s, the house organ flooded vaudeville performances and radio shows with notes from its eight levels of pipe and three keyboards. Since those days, though, the grand instrument, like many of its counterparts in aging theater halls, had succumbed to decay and neglect. Its keys were dull, its pitch less than perfect.
NEWS
March 5, 1996 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
So here's this onetime Saturday matinee fanatic sitting down to coffee and cookies in the "majestic without being overwhelming" home of Gregory Peck gathering material for a biography on one of Hollywood's revered legends. "To see this hero, this star . . . I couldn't believe it," said Gerry Molyneaux. "What a jolt. " How did Molyneaux finagle such a jolting moment? The same way he got to write the lives of film icons James Stewart and Charlie Chaplin. "Luck, persistence and stuff," Molyneaux says, smiling.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They blew up Sears last year, but another beloved landmark at Roosevelt Boulevard and Adams Avenue stands unharmed - to the relief of pizza lovers from Tacony to Texas. To some it seems that Charlie's Pizzeria has stood on Roosevelt Boulevard forever, but the building is a mere 36 years old - although the business will celebrate its 50th anniversary next year. Charlie's, like Pat's Steaks and Original Texas Wieners in South Philly, is one of those unchanging "don't mess with success" Philadelphia eating institutions that inspires amazing loyalty.
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