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Charmer

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FOOD
March 26, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: Timestone kitchen timer. Manufacturer. Made in China for Longford Industrial Ltd. Where: Foster's Gourmet Cookware. Price: $24.95. This kitchen timer - one in a series that includes a stylized cat, a pigand a cow - would look right at home in a kitchen that's more homey thanhigh-tech - the kind of kitchen where a real woofer might be nosing around,looking for a handout. When the dial is turned to the desired time setting, the critter turnsslowly until time is up, and he's back in a front-facing position.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
MILTON ANDERSON was the consummate charmer. Dapper in his Sunday best, he would greet congregants at the door of the Reformation Lutheran Church in Mount Airy, paying special attention to the ladies, whom he would welcome in French. How cool was that?   "He was very suave," said his daughter, Tracey L. Anderson. Milton was a pillar of the church, not only as the greeter, but also as a member of the Men's Ministry and the Church Council. He also took it upon himself to provide transportation and guidance to those who needed help and a ride.
REAL_ESTATE
April 17, 2011 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber, For The Inquirer
Sometimes, searching for the perfect house is like looking for the perfect mate: You meet, you court, you try to close the deal. In the case of Janet and Jim Bogorowski, patience and perseverance were the operative words. They were living in Upper Makefield when they had an epiphany about moving. "We were spending more time leaving Bucks County than staying in it," says Janet, a stay-at-home mother of four. They golfed at Huntingdon Valley Country Club, and their two older boys were attending La Salle College High School in Wyndmoor.
NEWS
June 17, 2009 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No smiling, dancing little girl should ever have a funeral at age 6. Yesterday, it seems, someone upstairs agreed. Above the enormous Deliverance Evangelistic Church at 2001 W. Lehigh Ave., once the sprawling site of Connie Mack Stadium, somber clouds remained in place throughout the 2 1/2-hour service taking place there, as if in apology for the tragedy being experienced inside. Beginning at 11 a.m., nearly 800 mourners streamed in to organ music and hymns to say goodbye to Aaliyah Tysheria Sernora Griffin - the first of last week's four victims of the Feltonville car crash to be buried.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011
Cave of Forgotten Dreams Werner Herzog's privileged look at the Chauvet Caves in France's Dordogne region meditates on the Paleolithic artists whose paintings of horses and lions were executed 32,000 years ago. No MPAA rating. Midnight in Paris What's Owen Wilson doing in a Woody Allen movie about a time-traveling tourist to the Jazz Age? Making light and making us laugh in this wistful charmer costarring Marion Cotillard and Rachel McAdams. PG-13 X-Men: First Class This "pre-boot" of the popular saga about mutants with superpowers has an Austin Powers-y love for the 1960s and committed performances by Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
In the middle of Aimee Mann's set at Union Transfer on Friday night, a single piece of confetti dislodged itself from the rafters and floated down in front of her, lazily spinning in the stage lights. "Quite a party," she quipped. Mann's set, which dwelled heavily on her new album, Charmer , was full of frustrated hopes and fizzled dreams, in keeping with a career that, she readily acknowledges, is not long on upbeat emotions. During an unscheduled pause occasioned by an onstage computer crash, she improvised a self-parodic song about a sad kitten lost in the rain.
NEWS
March 18, 2010 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
With his smooth-as-silk vocals and boy-next-door good looks - not to mention plenty of self-deprecating humor - Canadian crooner Michael Bubl?, 34, is a true onstage charmer. So much so that not even the cavernous Wachovia Center could detract from the intimate vibe at his sold-out performance Tuesday night. Nor could it hide the mutual affection between the much-adored singer and his much-praised audience, which joined him for sing-alongs several times during the 90-minute show. It didn't seem to matter that Bubl?'s song list was all over the place in terms of genre and pacing, everything from Kurt Weill ("Mack the Knife")
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | By Paddy Noyes, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Carrie, 2, is standing at the water cooler and intently watching the bottle, as though a goldfish might swim into view at any moment. Someone hands her a paper cup, and she holds it under the spigot, takes a sip, stands uncertainly - and then pours the remainder into a nearby wastebasket. It is a very good sign when Carrie understands her part in an interaction. Because of developmental delays, she recently was enrolled in an early- intervention program; after only three weeks in the program, she has learned many new words.
NEWS
December 12, 2005
IF CLIFTON DAVIS thought his hands were full fighting off Thelma's persistent romantic advances in the 1980s sitcom "Amen," he hasn't seen anything yet. Welcome to Welcome America. The actor, Baptist minister and Friend of John Street has been recommended by the mayor to be named Welcome America's new executive director. He'll need the approval of the Welcome America board next month to officially get the $90,000-a-year job. But that seems a sure bet: Street, a college buddy, chairs that board.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | by Sara Sherr, For the Daily News
In 1990, the mannered, jangly British quartet The Sundays seemed to come from nowhere. In the pre-Nirvana world, they made a pleasant little blip in the middle of Milli Vanilli, New Kids and Vanilla Ice. A wistful single called "Here's Where the Story Ends" was an undisputed charmer and college-radio breakout, even though everyone said you weren't supposed to care about British bands anymore. The album that it came from, "Reading, Writing and Arithmetic," sounded exactly like what you would expect from a band that would name itself after the day of the week when you sleep late, lounge around all afternoon and dread the coming week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
BILLY EDWARDS, who spent 15 years entertaining tourists as a costumed Colonial mischief-maker in the city's historic district, has been battling pancreatic cancer since July. So a bunch of his closest friends - including Thomas Jefferson, Betsy Ross and the Phillie Phanatic - will host a "Philly Helps Billy" fundraiser for the 47-year-old tonight at Franklin Square, on Race Street near 6th. The $25 cash-only admission - all of which goes to Edwards for cancer treatments - includes 18-hole Spooky Mini-Golf, carousel rides and refreshments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
If you want to appreciate a work of art, your attitude matters. Personally, I dislike romantic comedies, unless tempered with a darker subplot or an element of fantasy, or when carried off with panache. So I didn't expect to enjoy Midsummer (a play with songs) , a 2009 Scottish romcom by David Greig and Gordon McIntyre. I didn't know that Inis Nua's sly, fantastical production at the Off-Broad Street Theater would transform the genre. Midsummer opens on romcom staple number one: an unlikely pair of lovers, 35-year old childless divorce lawyer Helena (an utterly delightful Liz Filios)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
TURN BACK NOW, herpetophobes. That means you, people afraid of snakes and reptiles. Robert Keszey , the star of Discovery Channel's "Swamp Brothers," was found guilty of conspiracy to traffic in state- and federally protected reptiles in U.S. District Court here in Philadelphia. Keszey was convicted along with Robroy MacInnes , his partner at Glades Herp Farm Inc., of trafficking in protected timber rattlesnakes in violation of the Lacey Act. "Swamp Brothers," the 2011 Discovery show, features Keszey and his brother Stephen Keszey legally selling snakes at the Glades Herp Farm.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
In the middle of Aimee Mann's set at Union Transfer on Friday night, a single piece of confetti dislodged itself from the rafters and floated down in front of her, lazily spinning in the stage lights. "Quite a party," she quipped. Mann's set, which dwelled heavily on her new album, Charmer , was full of frustrated hopes and fizzled dreams, in keeping with a career that, she readily acknowledges, is not long on upbeat emotions. During an unscheduled pause occasioned by an onstage computer crash, she improvised a self-parodic song about a sad kitten lost in the rain.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
MILTON ANDERSON was the consummate charmer. Dapper in his Sunday best, he would greet congregants at the door of the Reformation Lutheran Church in Mount Airy, paying special attention to the ladies, whom he would welcome in French. How cool was that?   "He was very suave," said his daughter, Tracey L. Anderson. Milton was a pillar of the church, not only as the greeter, but also as a member of the Men's Ministry and the Church Council. He also took it upon himself to provide transportation and guidance to those who needed help and a ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011
Cave of Forgotten Dreams Werner Herzog's privileged look at the Chauvet Caves in France's Dordogne region meditates on the Paleolithic artists whose paintings of horses and lions were executed 32,000 years ago. No MPAA rating. Midnight in Paris What's Owen Wilson doing in a Woody Allen movie about a time-traveling tourist to the Jazz Age? Making light and making us laugh in this wistful charmer costarring Marion Cotillard and Rachel McAdams. PG-13 X-Men: First Class This "pre-boot" of the popular saga about mutants with superpowers has an Austin Powers-y love for the 1960s and committed performances by Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy.
REAL_ESTATE
April 17, 2011 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber, For The Inquirer
Sometimes, searching for the perfect house is like looking for the perfect mate: You meet, you court, you try to close the deal. In the case of Janet and Jim Bogorowski, patience and perseverance were the operative words. They were living in Upper Makefield when they had an epiphany about moving. "We were spending more time leaving Bucks County than staying in it," says Janet, a stay-at-home mother of four. They golfed at Huntingdon Valley Country Club, and their two older boys were attending La Salle College High School in Wyndmoor.
NEWS
March 18, 2010 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
With his smooth-as-silk vocals and boy-next-door good looks - not to mention plenty of self-deprecating humor - Canadian crooner Michael Bubl?, 34, is a true onstage charmer. So much so that not even the cavernous Wachovia Center could detract from the intimate vibe at his sold-out performance Tuesday night. Nor could it hide the mutual affection between the much-adored singer and his much-praised audience, which joined him for sing-alongs several times during the 90-minute show. It didn't seem to matter that Bubl?'s song list was all over the place in terms of genre and pacing, everything from Kurt Weill ("Mack the Knife")
NEWS
June 17, 2009 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No smiling, dancing little girl should ever have a funeral at age 6. Yesterday, it seems, someone upstairs agreed. Above the enormous Deliverance Evangelistic Church at 2001 W. Lehigh Ave., once the sprawling site of Connie Mack Stadium, somber clouds remained in place throughout the 2 1/2-hour service taking place there, as if in apology for the tragedy being experienced inside. Beginning at 11 a.m., nearly 800 mourners streamed in to organ music and hymns to say goodbye to Aaliyah Tysheria Sernora Griffin - the first of last week's four victims of the Feltonville car crash to be buried.
NEWS
September 28, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Paul Newman, 83, the Hollywood icon with the famous blue eyes and killer grin who seduced audiences with six decades worth of rebels, rascals and moody romancers, died Friday after a battle with cancer. He died in the farmhouse in Westport, Conn., where he lived with his wife, Joanne Woodward - his costar in life and in 10 of his movies - at his side, along with other family members. Mr. Newman, who also pursued politics and race cars and his philanthropic foodstuffs company with a passion, was an actor who radiated such easygoing, wily charm that it was virtually impossible to dislike the characters he played, even when they were selfish heels, shallow pretty boys, con men, or drunks - and they often were.
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