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NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
BARRE, Mass. - Working from a beige house at the end of a dirt road, Jeff Bardin switches on a laptop, boots up a program that obscures his location, and pecks in a passkey to an Internet forum run by an Iraqi branch of al-Qaeda. Soon the screen displays battle flags and AK-47 rifles, plus palm-lined beaches to conjure up a martyr's paradise. "I do believe we are in," says Bardin, 54, a computer security consultant. Barefoot in his bedroom, Bardin pretends to be a 20-something Canadian who wants to train in a militant camp in Pakistan.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the medical director of child and adolescent services at Friends Hospital, Suzanne Reiss sees lots of troubled children. So when she heard that a 15-year-old youth charged with sexually assaulting and then killing 11-year-old Edward P. Werner in Jackson Township, N.J., allegedly had been sexually assaulted himself by a man he met through an America Online chat room several months ago, Reiss was not shocked. "This did not surprise me," she said. "That is what was sad. " During the last year at the non-profit psychiatric center in the Northeast, Reiss has seen what she believes may be the first signs of a disturbing new trigger of teen trauma: perilous online relationships.
NEWS
July 14, 1999 | by Joshua Rhett Miller, Daily News Staff Writer
Jail time could be a mouse click away for perverts and pedophiles who roam over the Internet in search of unsuspecting youngsters. What may seem to be a pretty young girl could actually be an imposing law official. The FBI has recently heightened a program it calls "Innocent Images," which aims to identify, arrest and prosecute Internet predators who seek out children looking for sex or those who transmit child pornography. "The people who lure children are working from what they think is the safe confines of their home," FBI special agent Peter Gulotta said.
NEWS
December 10, 1997 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
It's 6 p.m. at Andrew Schwabe's Chester County office, and the worldwide hunt for a sex predator begins. As a 32-year-old gets raunchy in an America Online chat room with someone he believes is a 15-year-old girl named Flora, Schwabe goes to work, tracking the man behind the vulgar messages. The man, using a screen name suggesting he's a young dad, has asked the girl what type of sex she enjoys and whether she, too, likes young girls. He also graphically describes an experience he claims to have had with a 13-year-old girl.
NEWS
January 30, 1997 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man and woman "meet" online. They never actually meet face-to-face, and the man says there was not even a romance involved. Still, the woman's enraged husband kills her after she gets roses from her virtual friend. The tragic story of local sportscaster Howard Eskin's e-mail exchanges and chat sessions with Marlene E. Stumpf, a 47-year-old Pottstown woman who called herself Brandis on America Online, may lead many to ask how any close relationship can develop between people online in the first place.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The chat rooms at Paltalk.com were noisy. In the one labeled "Tennessee Blonde's Country Karaoke Party," someone calling himself Northern Guy was singing out with a twang: "Last niiiiight when I touched you, it brought back memories . . . " Over in "MC & Hugg's" room, Shag had turned up the reverb to enhance his voice as it traveled over the Internet: "It's good to touch the green, green grass of home . . . " When Shag was done, a burlap voice...
NEWS
October 16, 2003 | By Kevin Werbach
"I want to keep the information superhighway from resembling a red-light district. " That was Jim Exon, then Democratic senator from Nebraska, speaking before Congress in 1995. He had just introduced the Communications Decency Act (CDA), a misguided effort to thwart pornographers and pedophiles by prohibiting indecent speech on the Internet. The Supreme Court unanimously overturned the CDA, finding that it violated the First Amendment. In the years since, we've learned some things about the Internet.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This was Brian Niles' challenge. As director of graduate enrollment at La Salle University, Niles wanted a catchy, annual vehicle to pique students' curiosity about La Salle's graduate programs. Oh, sure, there were those traditional information fairs the Graduate Management Admission Council held, where prospective students wandered from booth to booth to collect literature and ask questions of admissions officials. But GMAC only holds such fairs every other year in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 8, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Teens love to talk, especially with people who know what's up. While they once socialized at the local arcade or soda fountain, youths in Swedesboro these days are hanging out at the public library. They go there, sometimes 20 in a day, not only to chat with one another - but with people they meet on the Internet. The Swedesboro Public Library sees Internet chat and e-mail as a way to draw youngsters into the libraries. Library director Marge Dombrosky might be happier if the teens used the computers to find answers to research questions, but she said they usually picked up a magazine or even checked out a book while waiting.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | by Thom Nickels
Much like the Lancaster County Amish, who avoid anything electric or mechanical, I resisted getting a computer for years. I fought the good fight until just recently, when I finally decided to enter the 21st century. The "graduation" has changed my life. First came the stressful transition: learning the ins and outs of various programs. Then came getting used to the look of the computer, specifically the Bauhaus off-white towers that called for a total rearrangement of my desk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
The phrase "water by the spoonful" has particular reference in Quiara Alegria Hudes' Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same title, currently at the Arden Theatre. But before I saw it, I imagined it might be about the global water crisis. Consider the recent chemical tainting of residential water in West Virginia. Consider the drought and raging wildfires in California. Consider that more than 1.2 billion people on Earth now live without a reliable source of fresh water. Then consider that this play is about a bunch of crack addicts who do awful things and are, with the exception of Hudes' recurring character Elliot, utterly boring and unsympathetic.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - The U.S. official who oversees American efforts to counter al-Qaeda and other militants in the online battlefield keeps a quote on his desk from a "Most Wanted" jihadi from America's South. The Alabama native wrote that "the war of narratives has become even more important than the war of navies, napalm and knives. " "I keep that on my desk because that is true," Alberto Fernandez, the top official at the State Department's Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications, told the Associated Press.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
AFORMER Philadelphia police detective admitted in federal district court Tuesday that he operated an anabolic-steroid and human-growth-hormone distribution ring from September 2009 to April 2011. Keith Gidelson, 36, of Bensalem, could face up to 37 months in a federal lockup when he is sentenced in January. Prosecutors said that Gidelson obtained monthly shipments from Europe and China, then sold the drugs to customers in his house and in fitness clubs, and to people he met in online weightlifting chat rooms through websites such as steroids.com and inject.com.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
BARRE, Mass. - Working from a beige house at the end of a dirt road, Jeff Bardin switches on a laptop, boots up a program that obscures his location, and pecks in a passkey to an Internet forum run by an Iraqi branch of al-Qaeda. Soon the screen displays battle flags and AK-47 rifles, plus palm-lined beaches to conjure up a martyr's paradise. "I do believe we are in," says Bardin, 54, a computer security consultant. Barefoot in his bedroom, Bardin pretends to be a 20-something Canadian who wants to train in a militant camp in Pakistan.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
Ala., Fla. coasts warned on storm NEW ORLEANS - Parts of two states were under a tropical storm warning Sunday as Debby churned off the Gulf Coast, leaving wary residents to closely watch a storm whose path has so far been difficult to forecast. Warnings were issued for coastal Alabama and parts of Florida, including the Panhandle. Debby already had dumped heavy rain on parts of Florida and spawned isolated tornadoes, causing damage to homes and knocking down power lines. It was not completely clear when or where the storm would make landfall.
NEWS
June 4, 2012
The Cost of Hope A Memoir By Amanda Bennett Random House. 240 pp. $26     Reviewed by Rachel Hadas     Like many memoirs, Amanda Bennett's The Cost of Hope braids several narrative strands together. For starters, there is an unusual and piquant courtship story. Bennett and Terence Foley, a charming, impulsive, and mysterious character, meet in 1983 in the city then still known as Peking. Bennett's a journalist; Foley is not quite who he claims to be. Bennett is winningly frank to admit that the couple' s relationship is tempestuous from the start, but their connection, however stormy, proves strong and enduring.
SPORTS
August 18, 2011
THE PHILLIES needed a righthanded hitter. Everybody agreed it was true. So general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. backed up the truck to the minor league system one more time and, next thing anybody knew, Hunter Pence was putting on a red-pinstriped jersey and talking about the dizzying leap from the worst record in baseball with the Houston Astros to the best with his new teammates. So here we are, less than 3 weeks later, and doggone if it doesn't look like the days when manager Charlie Manuel would grumble that teams would all but grab lefthanded pitchers off the nearest street corner to face them have been tucked safely into the past.
NEWS
December 13, 2007 | By RANDI BOYETTE
IN the blink of an eye or, more precisely, the click of a mouse - a family was destroyed. Last year, 13-year-old Megan Meier made friends online with a boy named Josh Evans. He seemed to like her - a very big deal to Megan. The, one day, Josh turned on her. "I don't know if I want to be friends with you anymore because I've heard that you are not very nice to your friends. " Soon, "Josh" was spreading rumors and people were posting online notices calling her fat, and a slut, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Bruce Willis shoots into the hotel suite like a blue-eyed bullet, head shaved, T white, jeans pale as his orbs. The wiry actor is trim, more like a spokesmodel for the imaginary health supplement Diet Hard than an aging action hero flogging a movie franchise last seen during Clinton's first term. After an absence of 12 years, Willis' alter ego John McClane returns to theaters Wednesday in Live Free or Die Hard - or Die Hard 4.0 , as it's called in Europe. Willis, 52, reprises the role of the battle-scarred NYPD detective who shoots from the hip and the lip, this time taking aim at cyberterrorists.
NEWS
February 24, 2006 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An animal-rights activist said yesterday that she hopes to mount some sort of legal challenge after being banned from the Philadelphia Zoo for comments she made about the facility's chief executive. Marianne Bessey, leader of Friends of Philly Zoo Elephants, incurred the zoo's wrath after making strongly worded remarks last week about zoo director Alexander L. "Pete" Hoskins in an Internet chat room called the Elephant Connection. In a posting dated Feb. 16 and addressed to Hoskins, Bessey discussed the zoo's treatment of Dulary, an injured, 42-year-old elephant that has been kept in a concrete barn since August.
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