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Chautauqua

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FOOD
July 17, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Though fashion may dictate wrinkled cotton or linen as chic, my generation will probably never feel comfortable wearing unironed clothes or seeing them on others. That small personal prejudice revealed, I'll go on to say that while I couldn't condone the laundry-bag look of a waiter's shirt and pants, it didn't keep me or a partner from enjoying a sunny lunch at Chautauqua recently. The setting at the five-year-old Chestnut Hill restaurant had been neat and stylish and the service smooth.
FOOD
September 15, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Set on the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay, with the produce powerhouse of New Jersey at its back door, Cape May is all about food. And with food comes politics. With politics comes discussions and occasionally arguments. The Cape May Forum, a nonprofit that conducts thought-inspiring series on various topics, this year will host "Guess What's Coming for Dinner? The Politics of Food in the 21st Century. " Running Thursday to Sunday and Sept. 22-25, the series will cover the Slow Food movement as well as fast food, the business of food, the politics of nutrition, sustainable farming and fishing, dining out, food and health, and "the real cost" of cheap food.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren T. Scott liked to provide an environment that he called "a third space," his restaurant partner, Richard Rossello, said. "The first space is home, the second space is work, and the third is a sense that people need a third place, a place where they can go to relax," Rossello said. "He just enjoyed creating the environment that restaurants offer," that third space. Mr. Scott, 59, of West Vincent, who co-owned several restaurants in the Philadelphia region, including the Chadds Ford Inn and Taquet in Wayne, died Tuesday, Oct. 2, at Bryn Mawr Hospital of complications from orthopedic surgery.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evgeny Primakov, the director of Moscow's Institute of World Economy and International Relations, said he found President Reagan's foreign policy speech yesterday afternoon "disappointing, offensive, patronizing and a return to old-style, Cold War rhetoric. " Mark Palmer, U.S. ambassador to Hungary, said Reagan's speech was "candid and hopeful," and one of the reasons Palmer "finds today one of the brightest, most hopeful moments in my life. " Helen Rivers, a retired manicurist from Cincinnati, thought the President "expressed himself very eloquently and made several good points, though he could have been a bit more positive.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
It was one of those shows that aren't presented to you so much as aimed at your chest area - the place where you breathe, where your heart is. Put another way, the objective of "We the People 200: The Constitutional Gala" was to take your breath away and make your heart beat faster. This was a black-tie, gilt-edged version of an old-fashioned Chautauqua cum revival meeting electronically transmitted for one time only from the spruced-up stage of the Philadelphia Civic Center. By turns classy, corny and compelling, the gala was a perfectly packaged, tastefully presented program that, in the spirit of the document it commemorated, tried to reach down and pull together the things Americans everywhere appreciate, honor and cherish.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paul Giovanni was hired earlier this year as artistic director of the Mount Gretna Playhouse, he naturally talked with the theater's board of directors about what kinds of shows they wanted him to put on. He found the discussions not very helpful. "I asked a lot of questions, but they had no idea what they wanted," Giovanni recalled. Giovanni already knew what the board did not want, however, and that was plays by George Bernard Shaw. For the previous five summers, the playhouse in this quaint town between Lancaster and Lebanon had featured the works of the great Anglo-Irish playwright.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Miriam Phillips was feted last week at the Wharton Esherick Museum in Paoli, where she is the live-in curator, on the occasion of reaching the age of 90. Remarkably sharp of mind and sound of limb, she attributes her acuity to "having something important to do" and her stamina to "running up and down the spiral stairs of the museum all the time. " Phillips first showed up on the doorstep of the swaddling Hedgerow Theater in Moylan, Delaware County, not long after its founder, the late Jasper Deeter, had quit a Chautauqua tent show in 1923 with $9 in his pocket and decided that a former 19th-century grist mill was a likely spot to establish a rustic repertory theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The distinctive Philadelphia flavor this summer season at the venerable Mount Gretna Playhouse extends from producing director Bernard Havard of the Walnut Street Havards and general manager Ken Wesler, ex-Wilma production chief, to an acting company of old friends (Douglas Wing, Sally Mercer, Marcia Mahon, et al), and even to some of the backstage help. Maybe my jingoism is showing, but the creaky old Chautauqua temple seems vastly improved thereby, what with a newly enlarged semi-thrust stage and other helps to getting the play out to the people that have been instituted by our peripatetic locals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the town's seemingly indestructible watering holes, the Little Pub at 1421 Sansom St., has received a complete overhaul and is reopening with weekend entertainment as Barlo's Pub & Grille. The first act will be keyboardist-singer Terry Sarrat. And the Old Parkway Room, 22d and Spring Garden Streets, has been rejuvenated and reopened as Cafe Adesso, which means now in Italian; the Carmen Tomasetti Duo will be in residence weekends. Tomasetti, who often reminds people of Billy Joel, concentrates on music from the '60s and '70s.
NEWS
May 26, 1986 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
The empty windows of the former Jo Harper's clothing store in Haverford have stared blankly at motorists on Lancaster Avenue for five months now. But behind the scenes, frantic negotiations have been under way to find a tenant for that space, which is one of the prime locations in one of the most successful - and exclusive - shopping centers in the area. The Haverford Square Shopping Center represents one of the great turnaround stories of the decade in the Philadelphia suburbs.
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NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren T. Scott liked to provide an environment that he called "a third space," his restaurant partner, Richard Rossello, said. "The first space is home, the second space is work, and the third is a sense that people need a third place, a place where they can go to relax," Rossello said. "He just enjoyed creating the environment that restaurants offer," that third space. Mr. Scott, 59, of West Vincent, who co-owned several restaurants in the Philadelphia region, including the Chadds Ford Inn and Taquet in Wayne, died Tuesday, Oct. 2, at Bryn Mawr Hospital of complications from orthopedic surgery.
FOOD
September 15, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Set on the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay, with the produce powerhouse of New Jersey at its back door, Cape May is all about food. And with food comes politics. With politics comes discussions and occasionally arguments. The Cape May Forum, a nonprofit that conducts thought-inspiring series on various topics, this year will host "Guess What's Coming for Dinner? The Politics of Food in the 21st Century. " Running Thursday to Sunday and Sept. 22-25, the series will cover the Slow Food movement as well as fast food, the business of food, the politics of nutrition, sustainable farming and fishing, dining out, food and health, and "the real cost" of cheap food.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
President Theodore Roosevelt called it "the most American thing in America. " And indeed, for more than half a century, the Chautauqua movement brought the best of America - speakers and entertainers - to its small towns. Founded 125 years ago, in 1874, the movement began as a summer school for Sunday School teachers that was housed in a tent on the shore of Lake Chautauqua in western New York state. By the 1890s, the mission of Chautauqua had expanded to include educational, cultural and entertainment programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The distinctive Philadelphia flavor this summer season at the venerable Mount Gretna Playhouse extends from producing director Bernard Havard of the Walnut Street Havards and general manager Ken Wesler, ex-Wilma production chief, to an acting company of old friends (Douglas Wing, Sally Mercer, Marcia Mahon, et al), and even to some of the backstage help. Maybe my jingoism is showing, but the creaky old Chautauqua temple seems vastly improved thereby, what with a newly enlarged semi-thrust stage and other helps to getting the play out to the people that have been instituted by our peripatetic locals.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Miriam Phillips was feted last week at the Wharton Esherick Museum in Paoli, where she is the live-in curator, on the occasion of reaching the age of 90. Remarkably sharp of mind and sound of limb, she attributes her acuity to "having something important to do" and her stamina to "running up and down the spiral stairs of the museum all the time. " Phillips first showed up on the doorstep of the swaddling Hedgerow Theater in Moylan, Delaware County, not long after its founder, the late Jasper Deeter, had quit a Chautauqua tent show in 1923 with $9 in his pocket and decided that a former 19th-century grist mill was a likely spot to establish a rustic repertory theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the town's seemingly indestructible watering holes, the Little Pub at 1421 Sansom St., has received a complete overhaul and is reopening with weekend entertainment as Barlo's Pub & Grille. The first act will be keyboardist-singer Terry Sarrat. And the Old Parkway Room, 22d and Spring Garden Streets, has been rejuvenated and reopened as Cafe Adesso, which means now in Italian; the Carmen Tomasetti Duo will be in residence weekends. Tomasetti, who often reminds people of Billy Joel, concentrates on music from the '60s and '70s.
FOOD
July 17, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Though fashion may dictate wrinkled cotton or linen as chic, my generation will probably never feel comfortable wearing unironed clothes or seeing them on others. That small personal prejudice revealed, I'll go on to say that while I couldn't condone the laundry-bag look of a waiter's shirt and pants, it didn't keep me or a partner from enjoying a sunny lunch at Chautauqua recently. The setting at the five-year-old Chestnut Hill restaurant had been neat and stylish and the service smooth.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
It was one of those shows that aren't presented to you so much as aimed at your chest area - the place where you breathe, where your heart is. Put another way, the objective of "We the People 200: The Constitutional Gala" was to take your breath away and make your heart beat faster. This was a black-tie, gilt-edged version of an old-fashioned Chautauqua cum revival meeting electronically transmitted for one time only from the spruced-up stage of the Philadelphia Civic Center. By turns classy, corny and compelling, the gala was a perfectly packaged, tastefully presented program that, in the spirit of the document it commemorated, tried to reach down and pull together the things Americans everywhere appreciate, honor and cherish.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The young man jostling for the microphone in the back of the jam-packed auditorium had a very serious question for Charles Thomas, the principal assistant secretary of state for European and Canadian Affairs. Col. Gen. Nikolai Chervov, head of the Soviet Foreign Ministry's Arms Control Directorate, was sitting a few feet from Thomas. He leaned forward on his chair and pressed the earphones closer to his head, having more than a passing interest in Thomas' answer. The young man in the college warm-up jacket just wanted to know this: Now that West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl had agreed to dismantle the 72 Pershing 1-A missiles that the Soviets found objectionable, and now that the United States had agreed to lessen its demands on verification, are there any more obstacles remaining before the two superpowers can conclude a new treaty on the elimination of all short- and medium-range missiles?
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evgeny Primakov, the director of Moscow's Institute of World Economy and International Relations, said he found President Reagan's foreign policy speech yesterday afternoon "disappointing, offensive, patronizing and a return to old-style, Cold War rhetoric. " Mark Palmer, U.S. ambassador to Hungary, said Reagan's speech was "candid and hopeful," and one of the reasons Palmer "finds today one of the brightest, most hopeful moments in my life. " Helen Rivers, a retired manicurist from Cincinnati, thought the President "expressed himself very eloquently and made several good points, though he could have been a bit more positive.
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