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SPORTS
January 19, 2001 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John LeClair didn't skate. Nothing unusual there. The Flyers left winger has done very little skating since mid-December because of back spasms. LeClair didn't talk. He was asked last night about what the team called a "routine checkup" on Wednesday, and declined to comment other than to say he had nothing to report. He has had serious back trouble since the season began. So concern about LeClair's back problems was heightened last night, if only because no one seemed to know anything about a routine checkup on the Flyers' most prolific goal-scorer over the last five years.
SPORTS
May 13, 2010 | By DAVID MURPHY, dmurphy@phillynews.com
DENVER - Brad Lidge still is officially day-to-day. The Phillies still think the elbow stiffness that has plagued him since saving a game Sunday against Atlanta is a minor setback common among players recovering from elbow surgery. But just to be sure, they sent their veteran closer back to Philadelphia yesterday to meet with the team doctor, Michael Ciccotti. "We just thought, after thinking about it last night, the best thing to do would be to send him back and let the doctor look at it," assistant general manager Scott Proefrock said.
LIVING
July 15, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
President Clinton got his annual physical. Should you? Instead of annual, think in terms of "periodic," say many health experts. "The annual physical with a standard battery of tests is an outmoded concept," said Dr. David Atkins, who was part of a federal panel that recently issued new guidelines on what a good physical should entail. He said most healthy adults can get by just fine with a checkup every two to three years. "You can make exceptions for people like airline pilots and presidents," said Atkins, a federal health policy analyst.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
Through Oct. 17, Philly.com/health and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series will culminate in a special Philly.com/Inquirer/Daily News section Oct. 18 and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . "I remember the day that my phone rang," said Caryn Kaplan of Langhorne, "an ordinary workday. I learned that my breast cancer had returned and metastasized to my liver and bones.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2008
DEAR TOM AND RAY: I drive a 2002 Mazda Miata. I love it. Yeah, I'm a guy, and it's a great car. It reminds me of my old MGB. Back when I had hair, I had a 1965 MGB roadster and picked up many a girl with that car. And the Miata is almost as good. I had the 60,000-mile checkup a month ago. After the checkup, I had to take it back because the fuel filter clogged up. The filter was clogged with a white substance. Then, a week ago, I had to have the fuel pump replaced and the fuel tank cleaned.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | By Mark Stroh, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Celestine White has something in common with baseball great Ted Williams, the last man to hit above .400 for a season. Like Williams in his prime, White has outstanding 20-10 eyesight. This was news to the 56-year-old, who yesterday received a free eye exam in a makeshift clinic in the lobby of the Life Center of Eastern Delaware County, a homeless shelter wedged along Upper Darby's border with Philadelphia. "I don't remember the last time I had my eyes checked," White said.
NEWS
August 14, 1995 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The need for financial planning has never been greater. Middle-income families are threatened by job losses, wages that don't keep pace with inflation, and cutbacks in health and retirement benefits. The urgency to save for an uncertain future often conflicts with more immediate priorities - buying a home, college tuitions, and supporting adult children who can't find jobs. Still, most people avoid planning because it means tough decisions. What goals are most important, and how much are you willing to cut consumption?
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's power elites are far too busy to sit down and make New Year's resolutions. They wouldn't make the right ones anyway. So the public-minded Clout page will do it for them. Mayor Rendell Midge Rendell shouldn't have to nag her husband to see a doctor and get a full checkup. That's our job. Your health is important to your family, to your city and to your future, mayor. Your work habits (full bore all day and all night), eating habits (a nightmare of junk food) and family history (father died young of a heart attack)
SPORTS
April 30, 1998 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
The Golden Boy is rosy-cheeked once again. Eagles quarterback Bobby Hoying appeared at Veterans Stadium yesterday looking decidedly uninfected and healthy, if thinner than usual. A day removed from a five-day hospital stay, he had lost 18 pounds off his 6-3 frame, dropping from 234 to 216. Still, he was in good spirits and, for the first time since before his Eastertime hospital visit, he was hungry. "I'm eating everything," Hoying said at an informal press conference that was slightly delayed by - what else?
NEWS
March 29, 1991
In recent years, Good Friday has taken on added meaning for both sides in the controversy over legal abortion. It is the day on which anti-abortion activists perform what they call "rescues" - to keep women from getting abortions. It also is the day pro-choice activists gear up to protect their rights to choose abortion. To forestall a repeat of prior Good Friday confrontations, Philadelphia-area clinics will perform no abortions today, but volunteers will distribute pamphlets on "women's health issues.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
William Penn is due for a physical. Not to mention a waxing and a buffing. The City of Philadelphia plans to restore Penn's bronze statue atop City Hall in late August. The work will take three to four weeks, during which time the observation deck will be closed. Penn's statue was last restored in 2007 with funds from the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia and the city. This time, a different mix is involved: $125,000 in private funds, a $25,000 National Endowment of the Arts (NEA)
SPORTS
March 12, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
IF THERE'S any such thing as lucky timing with injuries, the 76ers got lucky with Joel Embiid's apparent setback. It turns out that Embiid, the player they took with the third overall pick in June despite a stress fracture in his right foot, was scheduled to visit the doctor in Los Angeles this week to check the progress of the foot. It just so happens that Embiid admitted to the team that he was experiencing some soreness in the same foot and the team decided to put a boot on him just before he went out west.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Margaret Lafferty, M.D., For The Inquirer
The earsplitting scream turned every head. D, an otherwise healthy and robust 2-year-old boy, had arrived for his checkup and was having a superhero-size tantrum. Of course, routine visits to the pediatrician can trigger discontent in toddlers, but this boy's reaction was lasting an unusually long time. None of the staff's usual interventions were working and it was becoming clear he was fast approaching an inconsolable stage. His mother said that lately, D's meltdowns were getting worse; he was less talkative and not sleeping well at nap time or bedtime.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
Through Oct. 17, Philly.com/health and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series will culminate in a special Philly.com/Inquirer/Daily News section Oct. 18 and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . "I remember the day that my phone rang," said Caryn Kaplan of Langhorne, "an ordinary workday. I learned that my breast cancer had returned and metastasized to my liver and bones.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By William Loeffler, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
The geese will be winging south. Falling leaves will soon paper the landscape in hues of copper and butterscotch. As if you didn't need another reminder of autumn's reckoning, here's a thought certain to send a November chill coursing through your veins: This year's freshman class, currently cramming their dorm rooms with desk lamps and beanbag chairs, has never seen a paper airline ticket. The Class of 2016 gets its cultural vitals measured in the latest Beloit College Mindset List, the annual ethnographic snapshot of college freshmen, including those enrolled at Beloit's Wisconsin campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | Howard Gensler
It looks as though Lindsay Lohan has triggered a workplace-safety issue. Two Hollywood unions are scrutinizing Lindsay's TV movie "Liz & Dick" after the actress tweeted that she was exhausted because of long production days. That would be too much Liz and not enough Dick. Larry A. Thompson, producer of the Lifetime movie starring Lilo as Elizabeth Taylor, said Wednesday that no violations were found in the SAG-AFTRA review. The Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists confirmed that its representatives visited the production.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sheriff Akinleye bends low over a customer in the barbershop, his eyes intently following the movements on a little dial, and a stethoscope in his ears. Then he straightens up. "All right. I get 136 over 82. Which is a little high. Normal is less than 120 over 80. You have prehypertension," he tells Phillip Griffin, 42, who has heard this before - though perhaps not in this much detail. The 26-year-old medical student explains how high blood pressure works, each organ that it affects, its links to exercise, fried food, salt.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Fifteen years ago, when Nani and John Chong had an opening for an optometrist at their Center City optical boutique, they wanted Dr. B. Herbert Behrmann had a following. Patients raved about his calm instructions and corny jokes. After refracting thousands of glasses and contacts, Behrmann's old-school training and precision awed younger admirers. Dr. B was 75. He'd survived World War II and managed care, outlived two wives, and witnessed seismic changes in his profession, but could see no reason to stop working.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2011 | By Bill Toland, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
They say that dental clinics and funeral homes are recession-proof - you can't put off a toothache or a funeral. But dentists are finding out that you indeed can put off a tooth-whitening or your regularly scheduled checkup. About half of Americans lack dental insurance and, according to a recent survey, dental-care premiums increased at a faster rate in 2010 than traditional health-insurance premiums. Lack of coverage, increasing costs, and the lingering effects of the recession mean many are putting off checkups and more urgent procedures.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
Medicare must be cut, but the Cantor way would only shift costs to all citizens By Robert Field, professor of law and health policy at Drexel University Any deal to tame the federal deficit will have to cut Medicare. Its costs keep growing like weeds in summer. Eventually, it could eat up more tax dollars than any other government program. And like a weed, it will start to crowd out everything else. Most members of Congress on both sides of the aisle agree. The hard part is not whether to slice but how. Medicare cuts could affect our entire health care system.
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