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Cheers

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NEWS
February 28, 2016
On Feb. 20, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia held its third annual Cheers for CHOP. Nearly 600 supporters attended the event at the Valley Forge Casino. Guests enjoyed food, cocktails, silent and live auctions, and dancing to the live entertainment of DJ Jazzy Jeff, Go Go Gadjet, and Saved by the 90s. Speakers Katy Friedland, Friends of CHOP president, and event cochairs Allison and Jon Lubert, and Jen and Jon Rodack addressed the crowd, celebrating the mission and commitment of Children's Hospital to advance its research, teaching, and clinical priorities.
NEWS
May 20, 2008
WITH respect to the venerable TV Guide column "Cheers and Jeers," I'd like to propose cheers for the brave actions of two Philadelphia political figures. Let's start with Mayor Nutter, who, devastated by the murder of police Sgt. Stephen Liczbinski, loudly laid the blame for his death right on the doorsteps of the National Rifle Association. They, as you know, have fought every single effort, both locally and nationally, to have any type of even reasonable gun control measures enacted, and in 2004 blocked the renewal of the federal ban on assault rifles.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
IN 2005, Upper Darby surfaced on the Delaware Valley's radar. That was not necessarily good news for Philadelphia's bedroom suburb. The media suddenly were filled with accounts of "scumbags," "bums," "thugs" and "criminal enterprise" coming from new Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood. The last phrase landed him in court. The outspoken top cop, who rose through the ranks of the Philadelphia Police Department and then became chief of police in Middletown, Pa., and Portland, Maine, before returning to his home turf, has a dual reputation as SuperCop and also as a media-friendly quote machine.
SPORTS
December 13, 2011 | BY MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
Temple coach Steve Addazio coached Tim Tebow during their time at Florida. He sees what's happening now at the NFL level, where the second-year quarterback has become one of the most polarizing athletes in recent memory: mainly for not necessarily looking the part and defying the odds to lead the Denver Broncos to wins in seven of his eight starts, which, of course, has left the experts perplexed. Anyway, here is Tebow's former offensive coordinator's admittedly biased take on the situation.
SPORTS
February 20, 2011
The bleachers at the Carpenter Complex were filled to capacity Saturday for the first full-squad workout. What happens on the field isn't exactly glamorous. There are fielding drills, running drills, bullpen sessions, and pickoff practice. Yet when Cliff Lee took the mound for bunt-fielding practice, a loud ovation came. Lee cracked a smile. So did some of his teammates. Just another day at camp.
NEWS
December 30, 1995
No matter what tale the scoreboard lights at the Vet tell at about 7:30 this evening, Eagles fans, there's reason to rejoice in the season the team you follow with such moody fanaticism has had. Your team is playing a postseason game in its frigid, carpeted home for the first time since 1990. Your coach, the pleasingly blunt Ray Rhodes, was rightly named coach of the year. Your team's players - with a few exceptions, notably the unsilent (Ricky) Watters of "For who? For what?"
SPORTS
September 28, 2012 | Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Referee Gene Steratore turned on his microphone to greet the captains of the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore Ravens for the pregame coin toss Thursday night. "Good evening, men," Steratore said. "It's good to be back. " The stadium erupted in a roar. Yes, the real refs are back. Official harmony is restored to the NFL. Steratore and his seven-man crew donned their familiar stripes for the first game of Week 4 after 3 weeks of replacement officials created moments of chaos throughout the league.
NEWS
September 24, 2001 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There were no cheerleaders, no announcers. No band played. But there was the slightest snap of autumn in the air, and a hillside of cheering onlookers. Young men in maroon and gold huddled, then lined up. A football swiveled through the air and, on this day, into the local history books. With the kickoff last Monday, football, at long last, had come to Avon Grove High School. It was the school's first home game ever. Bill Corkadel was glad he could be there. "It makes me feel young again," said Corkadel, one of Avon Grove's first graduates - the class of '58. "I wish I was a student here now, and could be out there playing with them.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | BY EUGENE K. PFEFFER JR
Michael Jack Schmidt, hitting number four, playing third base. " The public address system rings loud and clear. A Phillies' line-up without that announcement would be like a Rolls Royce without a motor. Who can imagine such a happening? Who would want to hear of such a line-up, or even suggest that one is on the horizon? Sorry, I forgot Bill Conlin. It seems as though Bill is trying to rush to a close the greatest third base career of all time. Even if one believes the end is in sight, should he not handle the subject in a more gentle fashion?
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By Anne L. Boles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's been a year since eight big buses pulled up in front of the steel workers' union hall on Charles Street. Bill Clinton and Al Gore - fresh from the Democratic convention - clambered out to glad-hand the crowd and to talk about change. America's future president promised Coatesville that he would put its residents back to work. He promised to send their children to college. He promised to "put people first. " The crowd exploded in applause and cheers. Six months into office, Clinton has picked his Cabinet, submitted a budget and started translating promises into policies.
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NEWS
June 27, 2016
This month marked the opening of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's new pop-up beer garden, the Viaduct Rail Park, at 10th and Hamilton. While the popularity of these gardens may find its origin in the 21st century, the viaduct itself is more than 100 years old. Built in the 1890s by the then-named Pennsylvania and Reading Railroad, the mile-long Reading Viaduct is a combination of embankment sections and arched masonry bridges stretching from...
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
The primary author of a national report that calls for a crackdown on low-performing cyber charter schools said Thursday that the goal was to spur conversation. It did. Hours after the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools released the report, critics of online charter schools said they welcomed its findings and recommendations. Companies that manage online schools and some charter advocates dismissed the study and questioned the research on which it was based. Susan DeJarnett, a Temple University law professor who has been researching and writing about problems with Pennsylvania's cyber charter schools for years, said she was intrigued by many points in the report.
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Now that the Philadelphia School District is parting ways with substitutes contractor Source4Teachers, Philadelphia Federation of Teachers president Jerry Jordan isn't exactly saying, "I told you so. " But he notes that he predicted last fall that the Cherry Hill firm would be unable to deliver on its pledge to fill 75 percent of the positions that were vacant on the first day of school and 90 percent by Jan. 1. Yet Jordan opposes the district's proposal...
NEWS
May 5, 2016
ISSUE | BROAD STREET RUN Three cheers for Philly I would like to send a huge "thank you" to all the wonderful volunteers, spectators, and organizers of Sunday's Blue Cross Broad Street Run ("A river of runners," Monday). I had run the 10-mile race before, and this year I was running it with a friend who had never experienced it. I was telling her she might not get the full flavor of the race because of the rain, and was I wrong. The volunteers were enthusiastic and supportive, the bands were terrific, and the spectators were not deterred by the weather.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
President Andrew Jackson, slaveholder and killer of Indians and Englishmen, please step to the back. Harriet Tubman, African American abolitionist and leader of the Underground Railroad, come up front. On Wednesday, the federal Treasury Department announced the switch that's coming to the $20 bill, with the nation's seventh president losing his spot - a change that brought reaction from political leaders, schoolchildren, academics, and numismatists in Philadelphia and elsewhere. "I can't think of a better choice for the $20 bill than Harriet Tubman," tweeted Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Caroline Wiseblood Meline
Hooray for the St. Joe's men's basketball team for getting into this year's NCAA tournament. It's very exciting, and I hope they win the championship. I mean it. But there is something that gives me pause. In the heart of this supposed bastion of Jesuit integrity lies a worm eating away at its moral fiber. That worm is the university's reliance on a small army of adjuncts to teach a large portion of its courses while refusing to pay these professionals a living wage. I should know.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
On Feb. 20, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia held its third annual Cheers for CHOP. Nearly 600 supporters attended the event at the Valley Forge Casino. Guests enjoyed food, cocktails, silent and live auctions, and dancing to the live entertainment of DJ Jazzy Jeff, Go Go Gadjet, and Saved by the 90s. Speakers Katy Friedland, Friends of CHOP president, and event cochairs Allison and Jon Lubert, and Jen and Jon Rodack addressed the crowd, celebrating the mission and commitment of Children's Hospital to advance its research, teaching, and clinical priorities.
SPORTS
January 11, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
My discovery of the galvanizing power of school spirit came courtesy of Gloucester Catholic's Dribble Nuts in the late 1960s. Looking back, it's remarkable that group existed: a bunch of upperclassmen boys, mostly football players, who would dribble a basketball, Olympic Torch-relay style, to state tournament games. They would wear gray sweatshirts in the late-afternoon twilight and dribble a rubber basketball - as only football players can dribble a rubber basketball on asphalt - along the side of busy streets on their way to events as far away as Princeton and Perth Amboy.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Staff Writer
WELL, YOU can say this much for the 116th annual New Year's Day parade: It was . . . interesting. Whether you followed along in person, on a phone, or on TV, you probably witnessed some unique moments, from the introduction of new and more diverse performers to a protest march that ended with the arrests of two activists. Collected here are some snippets from a cold, windy morning and afternoon in Philadelphia. The sentimental tug of childhood memories lured Sharon Davis to Broad Street and Washington Avenue, where she sat yesterday morning with a blanket wrapped around her legs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
In the lobby of the 1500 Locust Apartments, the pile of boxes bearing labels like Amazon, H&M, StitchFix, and GNC teetered at shoulder height on a recent afternoon. At the Pepper Building in Southwest Center City, the parcels threatened to overtake the concierge desk. And at West River Apartments, a 162-unit complex in the city's Wynnefield section, leasing consultant Whitney Chitty said there were as many as 50 packages coming in daily. In November, her office began sending out daily emails to notify residents that it had received packages - and that those not retrieved within a week would be returned to sender.
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