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Cheeseburger

FOOD
October 2, 1996 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We thanked them when they told us about movie-theater popcorn. After all, who knew that something that smelled so good was really a coconut-oil-drenched time bomb in a tub? And now a mushroom cheeseburger with onion rings makes a gastronomical graveyard!? Popcorn was the news a few years ago, so the Center for Science in the Public Interest alerted the media. And journalists bit. The headlines eventually led to a culinary revolution, pushing some theaters to go so far as to offer air-popped popcorn to the coronary conservative.
LIVING
January 24, 1996 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last meal. It's a condemned prisoner's last free choice, a final moment of dignity and, perhaps, even pleasure. And it's one of those odd details of life people want to know. Make that an odd detail of death. Whether it's a cheeseburger with fries, a steak and potatoes or even a bag of chips, the last meal is always dutifully reported in news accounts, along with the last words. Last meals - like the one that presumably will be served tomorrow in Delaware to condemned murderer Billy Bailey - go down in history, just like the names of presidents, the victors of wars and the life stories of sports heroes.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
If they'll listen, I can save the food nags at the Center for Science in the Public Interest a lot of bother and expense. This is the outfit that first got our attention by revealing that many of the Chinese foods we enjoy are bad for our health, clogging our arteries and hyping our blood pressure. It seemed that for days we watched one CNN report after another on killer egg rolls and the deadly Gen. Ding-A-Ling's Chicken. Just when that faded, the same people came at us with the killer noodles report - how if you stuff yourself with Italian foods that are heavy in cream, eggs and rich cheeses, your pipes will jam and your eyes will bulge.
NEWS
October 17, 1993
PHILS' FAVORITE CHILDHOOD FODDER Larry Andersen: pudding cake. Lenny Dykstra: macaroni and cheese. Dave Hollins: pizza and wings. Pete Incaviglia: Italian sausage sandwich. John Kruk: cheeseburger. Curt Schilling: hot dogs. Mitch Williams: corn on the cob. -- From the Phillies 1993 Yearbook
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Riverlawn Malachai of Eagle - more affectionately called "Malie" by his friends - knew he would be dining well that night. After winning three blue ribbons in his class at the Bryn Mawr Kennel Club's 72d Annual Dog Show at Ludwigs Corner on Saturday, the tawny-brindle Irish wolfhound feasted on cheeseburgers. "Whenever he wins, we celebrate with cheeseburgers," said Malie's owner, Patricia Pearson of St. Peter's Village. "It's become a ritual," Pearson said, holding her blue ribbons in one hand while Malie stood obediently at her side.
SPORTS
March 29, 1992 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff Weinberg felt queasy, but it didn't deter him from doing major damage to an oversize cheeseburger as he sat in his Madison Square Garden seat, awaiting the opening face-off of Wednesday's Flyers-Rangers game. Weinberg, 25 and a self-described spreadsheet analyst from Clifton, N.J., is a die-hard Rangers fan. That means he was born to suffer. It also means he knows the answer to the question that all of New York seems to be asking these days: Will the National Hockey League players go on strike at noon tomorrow?
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
La Trattoria will never win any beauty contests. The early luncheonette ambiance is very much like that of the "Cheeseburger, cheeseburger, cheeseburger" diner on "Saturday Night Live. " That doesn't deter customers from flocking to this Old City restaurant for well-prepared down-home Italian food at prices that are very low for Center City. Nearly all the pasta dishes are under $6; the most expensive thing on the menu - grilled shrimp in garlic-lemon sauce - is $8.95. At these prices, you have do some work yourself.
NEWS
December 28, 1987 | By ROBIN EISMAN
The trash crisis and the pollution of our air, our water and our land have become topics that we hear about regularly now. Two especially frightening situations are the pollution and destruction of our oceans, results of which we saw this summer - dead dolphins and trash on our beaches - and the destruction of our atmosphere. What is causing these related crises? One major cause is the huge volume of material that we throw "away" daily. Styrofoam cups, plastic bottles, plastic product wrappers, cardboard boxes, and on and on and on. While the sheer amount of trash is mind-boggling enough, even worse is that much of it is not biodegradable, meaning that if it's dumped into landfills or oceans, it doesn't break down, but remains essentially intact forever.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
The quick actions of a school principal saved the life of a 13-year-old Drexel Hill Middle School student who was choking in the school cafeteria last week. The student, Michael Ennis, ran up to the principal, Charles Granger, when he began choking on a piece of cheeseburger at lunchtime. "He was in bad shape when he came over," Granger said. "As soon as it dawned on me, I turned him around and started the Heimlich maneuver," Granger said. "It makes you feel good that you were there and could help someone," he said.
NEWS
June 23, 1986 | BY MIKE ROYKO
We were in a hurry, so when the waiter came to the table with the menus, we didn't bother to look. "I'll have a hamburger," I said. "The same," my lunch companion said. The waiter, a young man in designer tennis shoes, said: "Uh, do you mean the Quarterbacker?" "The what?" I asked. He opened the menu and pointed at an item. Sure enough, it said: "The Quarterbacker. " "No," I said, "I want a hamburger. " "Uh, the Quarterbacker is a hamburger. " "Then why don't you call it a hamburger?"
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