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Cheesesteak

NEWS
July 14, 2009 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
The word Palestra on the side of a dilapidated building was good for a smile. The street called Via Filadelfia was a warming sight on a cold night. But it was the little handmade sign on the window of Mangia e Bevi Snackbar that brought on a full attack of homesickness: "Philly Cheese Steaks. " Now I know what you're thinking. You can't get a decent cheesesteak outside a 20-mile radius of Ninth and Passyunk. I've seen everything from hot roast beef sandwiches to hunks of sirloin on kaiser rolls passed off as Philadelphia cheesesteaks, and that's during travels in the States.
SPORTS
March 31, 2001 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hungry and unable to speak English, the Phillies' potential future arrived at Jack Russell Stadium yesterday just as the team was preparing to leave its spring-training home. Seung Lee and Il Kim, the two 21-year-old Korean righthanders the Phillies signed for a combined $2 million earlier this month, said through an interpreter that they knew nothing about Philadelphia and that their favorite American players were Cal Ripken Jr. and Randy Johnson. Lee likes Ripken. "He's a model of consistency," he said through a translator.
NEWS
July 21, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry M. Olivieri, 90, younger brother of Pat, as in world-famous Pat's King of Steaks, and co-creator of the original cheesesteak, died of heart failure yesterday at Atlantic City Medical Center in Pomona, N.J. He lived in South Philadelphia until three years ago, when failing health forced him to move to Atlantic City to live with his daughter, Maria. As the story goes, the two brothers operated a hot dog grill at Ninth Street and Passyunk Avenue in 1930, when Pat said to Mr. Olivieri, "Here's a quarter.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | BEVERLY SCHAEFER/ DAILY NEWS
Mayor Rendell eats' one billionth cheesesteak' made by Philadelphia Quality Foods. He didn't eat them all.
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By Tom Fitzgerald and Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
President Obama was in Philadelphia Monday evening to raise money for Democrats, but he stopped for a cheesesteak at Reading Terminal Market. The motorcade rolled to a stop on 12th Street, just south of Arch Street at 4:30 p.m., surprising the late afternoon crowd. Obama worked his way down the aisles, shaking hands, talking about the Eagles, asking "How you doing?" A crowd of about 50 people clustered beyond the security line. "Thank you, Obama," a man shouted. "Thank you my brother.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
YOU'VE HAD Pat's. You've had Geno's. You've had Tony Luke's and John's and Jim's and Steve's and D'Alessandro's and Donkey's and Chubby's and Cosmi's and Chick's and dozens more. But have you had a cheesesteak pot pie? Wontons? Spring rolls? Bao buns with spicy pickled shallots, homemade sriracha and micro cilantro? Yeah, probably. Eighty-three years after its invention, Pat and Harry Olivieri's humble creation - originated with butcher's scraps and a hotdog roll - has gone international.
NEWS
May 24, 2008 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
You've read it, heard it, tasted it, savored it, seen it in photo-op action: Want a "classic" or "authentic" Philly cheesesteak? Gotta go with Cheez Whiz. Maybe it's time to melt that myth. True, Whiz is king at Pat's and Geno's, those legendary South Philly sites at Ninth and Passyunk. During the Pennsylvania primary, Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert said their feud was fiercer than the Democrats' - and showed a sandwich dripping with Whiz. Barack and Michelle Obama, as well as Bill and Chelsea Clinton, ate at Pat's - and had Whiz.
NEWS
May 26, 2009 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here's a hot and juicy topic to sink your teeth in: The cheesesteak is No. 2? Funny, the things you stumble across on the Web. "I may never eat another Philly cheesesteak - not, at least, when I can have a roast pork sandwich," a writer opined some weeks ago in the Washington Post. Tim Warren, who lives in Maryland, was such a big cheesesteak fan that he often made food runs to Philadelphia and found he "wasn't the only idiot who had driven 100 miles for a $7 sandwich.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
LET'S FACE IT, the real question here is: Does Rocky's cheesesteak live up to the high standards we natives set for this most Philadelphian of delicacies? The answer, in short, is no. The combination of machine-processed cheese and mayonnaise glopped onto the steak is distinctly un-Philadelphian. (Argentines have a love affair with mayo, so its presence here is not surprising.) These ingredients create a topping you'd be more likely to get at a bar in Davenport, Iowa, or Omaha, Neb., than on a steak from an authentic joint in the City of Brotherly Love.
SPORTS
February 15, 2006 | By Phil Sheridan INQUIRER COLUMNIST
The word Palestra on the side of a dilapidated building was good for a smile. The street called Via Filadelfia was a warming sight on a cold night. But it was the little handmade sign on the window of Mangia e Bevi Snackbar that brought on a full attack of homesickness: "Philly Cheese Steaks. " Now I know what you're thinking. You can't get a decent cheesesteak outside a 20-mile radius of Ninth and Passyunk. I've seen everything from hot roast beef sandwiches to hunks of sirloin on kaiser rolls passed off as Philadelphia cheesesteaks, and that's during travels in the States.
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