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FOOD
May 22, 1996 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I love sun-dried tomatoes under olive oil, but, being retired, I find them expensive. I have a bag of sun-dried tomatoes but don't know how to prepare them. Can you help me? Ray Cascella Penrose Park Dear Ray, Carla Fusaro is the chef/owner, with her husband Enzo, of the classic Northern Italian restaurant, Il Gallo Nero, which they recently relocated from Center City to Ambler. Carla says sun-dried tomatoes are similar to dried fruits like apricots.
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Authorities are turning up the heat on chef Guy Sileo. Montgomery County's first deputy district attorney yesterday called Sileo the prime suspect in the murder nearly two years ago of James Webb, Sileo's business partner and fellow chef at the General Wayne Inn. The two men were deeply in debt when Webb, 31, was shot in the head Dec. 26, 1996, as he worked in the offices of the historic inn in Lower Merion. Following the killing, authorities learned that Sileo and Webb owed more than $1 million on the restaurant, had been feuding over its operation and had taken out $650,000 life insurance policies on each other.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Joshua, 15, loves going hunting with his foster father. When the teenager bagged his first deer, using only a bow and arrow, they were both excited. Joshua's many other interests include camping, swimming, weight lifting, video games, and playing football. In the 10th grade, Joshua attends a vocational high school. He enjoyed carpentry classes so much that he may make this trade his career. He is learning auto repair. His brother Jason, 13, is in seventh grade and receives help in math and reading.
FOOD
June 4, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Nicola Shirley wants to be a cook. Well, cook may not be exactly the right word. The Germantown High School senior has set her sights a bit higher. "I want to be a chef," she emphasized in no uncertain terms. "I don't just want to cook. I want to learn the culinary arts. This is what distinguishes cooks from great chefs. " Quite an interesting view from one so young. And just how does this 18- year-old with the self-designed challenge intend to accomplish this? "Lots of hard work," she explained.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By John V.R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to its recent takeover by one of the region's best chefs, the Golden Pheasant Inn has a new lease on life. The 1857 Bucks County landmark had been in a state of senescence in recent years, but it was reopened Oct. 3 by Michel Faure, a native of Grenoble, France, who has worked at a number of the area's best restaurants, including Le Bec-Fin and the Bellevue Stratford in Philadelphia and the Hotel du Pont in Wilmington. Faure had operated the nearby Carversville Inn since July 1984, but he jumped at the chance for the Golden Pheasant's larger quarters and more visible River Road location in Erwinna.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Family and friends of James E. Webb, who co-owned the General Wayne Inn in Lower Merion, will hold a memorial service tomorrow night to commemorate the third anniversary of his slaying. The service will take place 8 p.m. at St. Timothy's Church on Route 452 in Aston. Carol Casey of Folsom, a friend of Webb's, said the family wanted to honor his memory and keep him alive in the thoughts of those who knew him. "It's also important, I believe, since it's an unsolved murder, to keep it out in front," Casey said.
FOOD
May 19, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Through tense silence at Avery Fisher Hall in New York earlier this month, he heard his name wash over him. Michael Solomonov. Pronounced correctly, even. Sol-ah-MON-ov . Beaming, he made his way to the lectern, where he was handed a bronze medallion bearing the visage of James Beard, attached to a yellow ribbon. Best chef, Mid-Atlantic region. Solomonov had no prepared speech for the James Beard Foundation, the Oscars of the food world. "I didn't want to lose again and go home with a speech in my pocket," said Solomonov, 32, who was nominated last year in the same category and two years ago in the category of rising-star chef.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Head chef Nathaniel Frison, 79, of West Philadelphia, a legend in the kitchen at the Old Original Bookbinder's restaurant on Walnut Street for nearly half a century, died Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A quiet, meticulous man, Mr. Frison developed the recipes for Manhattan clam chowder, snapper soup and bouillabaisse at Bookbinder's. "He was a wonderful person and a magnificent chef," said John Taxin Sr., the restaurant's owner since 1941. Mr. Frison began working at the restaurant in 1936.
NEWS
December 8, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Anna Pilla, who worked side by side with her late husband, chef and restaurateur Vincent "Cous" Pilla Sr., to make the old Cous' Little Italy a favorite dining stop for movie actors, mob bosses and other fanciers of Italian cuisine, died Saturday. She was 56 and lived in South Philadelphia. "When my dad first started, Mom was a waitress," said John Pilla, one of the couple's two sons. "It was like a partnership, in a sense. "He was always in the kitchen cooking. She would tell him what was happening on the floor, what people liked.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Zappley, the exuberant young chef from West Deptford, fell just short in his quest for the title of MasterChef Junior on Tuesday night's season finale of the cooking show of the same name. Andrew, a seventh grader at Holy Trinity Regional School in Westville, watched the episode with teachers, classmates, and parents in Holy Trinity's gym. "There isn't anyone who wanted that prize more than Andrew," his father, Phillip, told the crowd. After the results were announced, Phillip Zappley and principal Elsie Tedeski presented Andrew with an award from the school, along with a framed collage of news clippings tracking his progress through the competition.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year ago, many at Holy Trinity Regional School knew Andrew Zappley as an outgoing student with a big personality, but few knew about his private passion - cooking. Now there is scarcely a student or teacher who doesn't know, and the school community has come together to cheer on the 12-year-old chef as he bakes, dices, and sears his way through the MasterChef Junior competition in the hope of winning the TV show's $100,000 prize. Tuesday night, teachers, parents, and students gathered in the Westville school's gym to watch the prerecorded episode of Andrew leading his blue team to victory in the "Restaurant Takeover" challenge, which had the young chefs running the kitchen of a Los Angeles fine-dining restaurant.
FOOD
February 6, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
For their third stand at Reading Terminal Market, George and Kim Mickel have gone with burgers. Hunger Burger , replacing the Tokyo sushi stand smack in the middle of center court, joins By George, their Italian stand on the Filbert Street side (1990), and Mezze, a Mediterranean takeaway (2003). The name refers more to the Mickels' mission than to a customer's belly. They went to El Salvador with their church to work with King's Castle Ministries, supporting feeding programs.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Celebrity chef and television host Anthony Bourdain has traveled the globe in pursuit of culinary adventures for his travel and food shows, sampling delicacies such as cobra in Vietnam, iguana in Nicaragua, and warthog in Africa. This week, he dined on cheesesteaks from Donkey's Place in Camden, one of the city's most beloved lunch spots since it opened more than 70 years ago. On Monday, Bourdain and his camera crew crowded into the Haddon Avenue tavern and Bourdain savored a "Donkey steak," the restaurant's famous thinly sliced steak sandwich, served on a round, poppy-seeded kaiser roll instead of the traditional long roll.
FOOD
January 30, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
  What's on the way Center City is crisscrossed by tiny alleys that time, developers, and the 21st century largely forgot, so you may not have noticed an orange liquor application on what appears to be an orphaned carriage house at 1432 Cypress St., behind Vetri's parking lot and the Center City One condo building. If neighborhood resident Ram Krishnan has his way, the turquoise-trimmed building will become a European-style cafe called the Republic . Krishnan, a world-traveled consultant, who bought the place last year to keep it from becoming another parking lot, said he was not looking for a big, splashy affair at what was the Scribe Video Center.
FOOD
January 22, 2015
Rex 1516 has become something of an open mic for burgers since July, when chef Justin Swain began inviting a new chef pal each week to concoct a Tuesday-Wednesday burger fantasy for the City Wide Burger Special. Paired with a shot of Buffalo Trace and a pint of Newbold for $15 (a nod to the actual "citywide" drink special offered in local bars), it's a tremendous value. From "Choucroute: There it is!" (topped with sauerkraut and apple jam) by Will BYOB sous-chef Craig Russell to "New Pigs on the Guac" (Chihuahua cheese and pork belly al pastor)
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personal chef Christopher Lee Abbott, also known as Chef Kristov, is passionate about healthy, tasty cuisine - even working two acres of farmland on a co-op in Delaware to cultivate fresh ingredients to use in his dishes. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Abbott, 49, learned to cook from watching his grandmother in the kitchen. He also worked alongside Keven Parker back when Parker was his neighbor and operating a catering business from his basement before opening Ms. Tootsie's Restaurant Bar and Lounge on South Street.
FOOD
January 9, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to restaurant trend forecasts, there's sometimes a tendency toward the frivolous: Is kale finally wilting? Are doughnuts the new cupcakes? Will this be the year crickets become a mainstream protein? But when chefs and forecasters look to 2015, they see more substantive changes ahead. Those have less to do with what's in fashion than with evolving technology, looming concerns about sustainability, and a pressing need to manage costs as restaurant workers seek higher wages.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Robert's dual passions are cooking and inventing, both of which top the 16-year-old's list of career goals. But until the day when he realizes his dream of becoming either a chef or an inventor, Robert's favorite teen activities are weightlifting, fishing, and building things. Enrolled in a vocational school where he receives special-education services, Robert does well academically. Easy-going and articulate, he gets along well with adults, and isn't shy around them. It takes him a few minutes to warm up around his peers.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
CHEF BEN FORD has always thought outside the oven. Ford started cooking holiday dinners for his family when he was 12. He recalls the year he made salmon in the dishwasher. "It was a recipe that was going around in the '70s," he said, "I remember wrapping it in foil and putting it in the top bin and turning it on some cycle or another. My family seemed to like it. " Always a culinary tinkerer, the future chef was forever devising kinetic doodads that would turn the oven on and off or set some foodie notion in motion.
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