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FOOD
May 22, 1996 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I love sun-dried tomatoes under olive oil, but, being retired, I find them expensive. I have a bag of sun-dried tomatoes but don't know how to prepare them. Can you help me? Ray Cascella Penrose Park Dear Ray, Carla Fusaro is the chef/owner, with her husband Enzo, of the classic Northern Italian restaurant, Il Gallo Nero, which they recently relocated from Center City to Ambler. Carla says sun-dried tomatoes are similar to dried fruits like apricots.
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Authorities are turning up the heat on chef Guy Sileo. Montgomery County's first deputy district attorney yesterday called Sileo the prime suspect in the murder nearly two years ago of James Webb, Sileo's business partner and fellow chef at the General Wayne Inn. The two men were deeply in debt when Webb, 31, was shot in the head Dec. 26, 1996, as he worked in the offices of the historic inn in Lower Merion. Following the killing, authorities learned that Sileo and Webb owed more than $1 million on the restaurant, had been feuding over its operation and had taken out $650,000 life insurance policies on each other.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Joshua, 15, loves going hunting with his foster father. When the teenager bagged his first deer, using only a bow and arrow, they were both excited. Joshua's many other interests include camping, swimming, weight lifting, video games, and playing football. In the 10th grade, Joshua attends a vocational high school. He enjoyed carpentry classes so much that he may make this trade his career. He is learning auto repair. His brother Jason, 13, is in seventh grade and receives help in math and reading.
FOOD
June 4, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Nicola Shirley wants to be a cook. Well, cook may not be exactly the right word. The Germantown High School senior has set her sights a bit higher. "I want to be a chef," she emphasized in no uncertain terms. "I don't just want to cook. I want to learn the culinary arts. This is what distinguishes cooks from great chefs. " Quite an interesting view from one so young. And just how does this 18- year-old with the self-designed challenge intend to accomplish this? "Lots of hard work," she explained.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By John V.R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to its recent takeover by one of the region's best chefs, the Golden Pheasant Inn has a new lease on life. The 1857 Bucks County landmark had been in a state of senescence in recent years, but it was reopened Oct. 3 by Michel Faure, a native of Grenoble, France, who has worked at a number of the area's best restaurants, including Le Bec-Fin and the Bellevue Stratford in Philadelphia and the Hotel du Pont in Wilmington. Faure had operated the nearby Carversville Inn since July 1984, but he jumped at the chance for the Golden Pheasant's larger quarters and more visible River Road location in Erwinna.
FOOD
May 19, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Through tense silence at Avery Fisher Hall in New York earlier this month, he heard his name wash over him. Michael Solomonov. Pronounced correctly, even. Sol-ah-MON-ov . Beaming, he made his way to the lectern, where he was handed a bronze medallion bearing the visage of James Beard, attached to a yellow ribbon. Best chef, Mid-Atlantic region. Solomonov had no prepared speech for the James Beard Foundation, the Oscars of the food world. "I didn't want to lose again and go home with a speech in my pocket," said Solomonov, 32, who was nominated last year in the same category and two years ago in the category of rising-star chef.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Family and friends of James E. Webb, who co-owned the General Wayne Inn in Lower Merion, will hold a memorial service tomorrow night to commemorate the third anniversary of his slaying. The service will take place 8 p.m. at St. Timothy's Church on Route 452 in Aston. Carol Casey of Folsom, a friend of Webb's, said the family wanted to honor his memory and keep him alive in the thoughts of those who knew him. "It's also important, I believe, since it's an unsolved murder, to keep it out in front," Casey said.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Head chef Nathaniel Frison, 79, of West Philadelphia, a legend in the kitchen at the Old Original Bookbinder's restaurant on Walnut Street for nearly half a century, died Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A quiet, meticulous man, Mr. Frison developed the recipes for Manhattan clam chowder, snapper soup and bouillabaisse at Bookbinder's. "He was a wonderful person and a magnificent chef," said John Taxin Sr., the restaurant's owner since 1941. Mr. Frison began working at the restaurant in 1936.
NEWS
December 8, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Anna Pilla, who worked side by side with her late husband, chef and restaurateur Vincent "Cous" Pilla Sr., to make the old Cous' Little Italy a favorite dining stop for movie actors, mob bosses and other fanciers of Italian cuisine, died Saturday. She was 56 and lived in South Philadelphia. "When my dad first started, Mom was a waitress," said John Pilla, one of the couple's two sons. "It was like a partnership, in a sense. "He was always in the kitchen cooking. She would tell him what was happening on the floor, what people liked.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | JULIE SHAW, DAILY NEWS STAFF
ALEX CAPASSO, the chef who opened the Crow & the Pitcher bar-restaurant just south of Rittenhouse Square last year, appeared before a federal magistrate yesterday, and through his federal defender, did not contest his detention on a charge of distribution of child porn. Capasso, 41, bearded and wearing a forest-green prison jumpsuit, had been arrested Monday at his Collingswood home. According to court documents, on July 6, he responded to an online ad posted by an undercover agent with a Washington, D.C., police-and-FBI task force.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
THEY CALLED it "The Hamptons Meet Philly," and the white linen- and seersucker-clad 10th-anniversary cocktail party celebrating Anthony Henderson and Jason Strong 's decade together went off without a hitch this weekend. Henderson is a longtime celebrity fashion stylist who balances his time between Philly and L.A., and has been doing wardrobe dressing for the Daily News ' Sexy Singles for more than a decade. Strong is an LGBT activist. Together, the couple has a 4-year-old adopted son, Marcelino . After meeting on a dating website more than a decade ago, they've outlasted many of their gay and straight couple counterparts.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
They came for Eli. Hundreds of food lovers and dozens of chefs helped raise more than $130,000 Thursday night at a fund-raiser at Fork Restaurant for Eli Kulp, one of the city's most promising and celebrated chefs, who was paralyzed in the May 12 crash of Amtrak Train 188. Thursday night's benefit - with $25,000 in donations from a silent auction - will be combined with $49,000 raised previously to help offset medical expenses for Kulp, 37,...
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | Drew Lazor, Daily News
THEIR intentions shrouded by the cloak of deep night, the drivers hurried up the interstate. The body, sawed into four pieces, sat motionless in the back of the pickup, hidden from plain view. When they finally reached their destination, they heaved the fleshy quarters onto a metal table in a silent kitchen, where a tattooed man with a sharp, sharp knife went to work. Hours later, after the body was butchered beyond recognition, the man called his friends, each of whom grew giddy when told they were allowed to pick their favorite parts and play with them.
FOOD
July 10, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Opa's new chef, Bobby Saritsoglou, has been on a mission to modernize Greek food by reviving some of its old-school techniques. On the tender octopus platter, for example, some lacto-fermented cauliflower pickles and a garlicky bread- and almond-thickened skordalia sauce show off some throwback moves (modern skordalia, he says, is more commonly thickened with potatoes). House-brined grape leaves get stuffed with grass-fed beef touched with fenugreek and clove. My favorite update, though, is Saritsoglou's reclamation act for gyros.
FOOD
July 3, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
If you're looking for ways to liven up your grilling for Fourth of July weekend, then it's time to look beyond the burger/steak/chicken trifecta and start thinking of ways to eke flavor out of all kinds of ingredients. "Grilling gives food that extra, unexpected element. The grill is basically the centerpiece of our kitchen . . . almost everything touches it at some point," says Eli Collins, chef of Pub & Kitchen. What chefs like Collins are doing in restaurant kitchens works just as well at home: Moving meat from the center of the plate (and fire)
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Summer Openings The summer restaurant scene will bring but one blockbuster opening: Cheesecake Factory's first Center City location, which opened Tuesday at 15th and Walnut Streets. Also, Cheesecake's internationally focused Grand Lux Cafe opens this week at the King of Prussia mall, across the mall property from another Cheesecake Factory. Together, the two new restaurants employ more than 500 people. On Thursday, the Main Line gets a b.good (Wynnewood Shopping Center, Wynnewood)
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
MORE THAN 40 local artists will be painting landscapes along Germantown Avenue tomorrow when the Chestnut Hill Business District presents its first "En Plein Air" (in open air) art competition from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Not to be outdone by the painters, four Chestnut Hill chefs will be brush stroking the shrimp on the barbie - and the meat and poultry - as they demonstrate the art of grilling all afternoon. Artist Cathy Hozack has lived and painted in Chestnut Hill for years, but tomorrow will be the first time she creates art on her neighborhood's main street.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Everyone knows the chef's name. After all, this story began at a ristorante called Vetri. But behind every Marc Vetri success, and the company's growing roster of Italian concepts, the chef's longtime business partner and dining room alter ego, Jeff Benjamin, has been there every step of the way. He's Mr. Logistic to the Pasta Maestro, making sure the inspired plates are delivered with hospitality and grace. Multiple nods from the James Beard Foundation as one of America's best service teams attest to that achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
Milly in Philly A local guy is among the four finalists who have survived  Chef Gordon Ramsay 's intense grilling on this season of Fox's "Hell's Kitchen. " Milly Medley  is a 33-year-old executive chef who hails from 23rd Street and Montgomery Avenue, in North Philly. He, of course, couldn't reveal any news about the final episode or the ultimate winner, but Medley did speak with me for a few minutes about his experiences on the show. He said he felt honored to work among "some of the best female chefs I've ever seen in my life.
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