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FOOD
May 22, 1996 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I love sun-dried tomatoes under olive oil, but, being retired, I find them expensive. I have a bag of sun-dried tomatoes but don't know how to prepare them. Can you help me? Ray Cascella Penrose Park Dear Ray, Carla Fusaro is the chef/owner, with her husband Enzo, of the classic Northern Italian restaurant, Il Gallo Nero, which they recently relocated from Center City to Ambler. Carla says sun-dried tomatoes are similar to dried fruits like apricots.
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Authorities are turning up the heat on chef Guy Sileo. Montgomery County's first deputy district attorney yesterday called Sileo the prime suspect in the murder nearly two years ago of James Webb, Sileo's business partner and fellow chef at the General Wayne Inn. The two men were deeply in debt when Webb, 31, was shot in the head Dec. 26, 1996, as he worked in the offices of the historic inn in Lower Merion. Following the killing, authorities learned that Sileo and Webb owed more than $1 million on the restaurant, had been feuding over its operation and had taken out $650,000 life insurance policies on each other.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Joshua, 15, loves going hunting with his foster father. When the teenager bagged his first deer, using only a bow and arrow, they were both excited. Joshua's many other interests include camping, swimming, weight lifting, video games, and playing football. In the 10th grade, Joshua attends a vocational high school. He enjoyed carpentry classes so much that he may make this trade his career. He is learning auto repair. His brother Jason, 13, is in seventh grade and receives help in math and reading.
FOOD
June 4, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Nicola Shirley wants to be a cook. Well, cook may not be exactly the right word. The Germantown High School senior has set her sights a bit higher. "I want to be a chef," she emphasized in no uncertain terms. "I don't just want to cook. I want to learn the culinary arts. This is what distinguishes cooks from great chefs. " Quite an interesting view from one so young. And just how does this 18- year-old with the self-designed challenge intend to accomplish this? "Lots of hard work," she explained.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By John V.R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to its recent takeover by one of the region's best chefs, the Golden Pheasant Inn has a new lease on life. The 1857 Bucks County landmark had been in a state of senescence in recent years, but it was reopened Oct. 3 by Michel Faure, a native of Grenoble, France, who has worked at a number of the area's best restaurants, including Le Bec-Fin and the Bellevue Stratford in Philadelphia and the Hotel du Pont in Wilmington. Faure had operated the nearby Carversville Inn since July 1984, but he jumped at the chance for the Golden Pheasant's larger quarters and more visible River Road location in Erwinna.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Family and friends of James E. Webb, who co-owned the General Wayne Inn in Lower Merion, will hold a memorial service tomorrow night to commemorate the third anniversary of his slaying. The service will take place 8 p.m. at St. Timothy's Church on Route 452 in Aston. Carol Casey of Folsom, a friend of Webb's, said the family wanted to honor his memory and keep him alive in the thoughts of those who knew him. "It's also important, I believe, since it's an unsolved murder, to keep it out in front," Casey said.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Head chef Nathaniel Frison, 79, of West Philadelphia, a legend in the kitchen at the Old Original Bookbinder's restaurant on Walnut Street for nearly half a century, died Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A quiet, meticulous man, Mr. Frison developed the recipes for Manhattan clam chowder, snapper soup and bouillabaisse at Bookbinder's. "He was a wonderful person and a magnificent chef," said John Taxin Sr., the restaurant's owner since 1941. Mr. Frison began working at the restaurant in 1936.
NEWS
December 8, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Anna Pilla, who worked side by side with her late husband, chef and restaurateur Vincent "Cous" Pilla Sr., to make the old Cous' Little Italy a favorite dining stop for movie actors, mob bosses and other fanciers of Italian cuisine, died Saturday. She was 56 and lived in South Philadelphia. "When my dad first started, Mom was a waitress," said John Pilla, one of the couple's two sons. "It was like a partnership, in a sense. "He was always in the kitchen cooking. She would tell him what was happening on the floor, what people liked.
NEWS
February 27, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
This is one in an occasional series of profiles of local chefs and restaurant owners. The image of a celebrity chef as a raging perfectionist and whirling dervish in the kitchen does not apply to Alison Barshak, the unassuming chef-owner of Alison at Blue Bell. As one of the region's handful of high-profile female chefs, she has captivated the local restaurant community since her debut at the Striped Bass more than a decade ago. Her 65-seat restaurant, in a mini office complex in Blue Bell, generally is filled to capacity on weekends.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
IN A CITY with as vibrant a dining scene as Philadelphia's, restaurants come and go at a dizzying pace. Even really good ones can fizzle in the face of competitive new talent and the public's fickle tastes. What's the secret to staying relevant in the exhausting and ever-changing restaurant business? Recently, we asked a few of Philadelphia's most seasoned restaurateurs to share their thoughts and strategies on what it takes to stay in the game.   Back to her roots When Susanna Foo closed her Walnut Street restaurant in 2009 after 22 years, the loss was profound.
FOOD
May 1, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
What's new The first Greek American chef at the mod Greek spot  Opa  (1311 Sansom St.), Bobby Saritsoglou has revamped the menu top to bottom. It's all small plates. Mike Giammarino, who owns the century-old Lombardi's in Manhattan as well as Gennaro's Tomato Pie in South Philadelphia, just debuted  Grace & Pat's , a family friendly ristorante at 1533 S. 11th St. (215-336-3636), across from the Singing Fountain on Passyunk Square. The cash-only BYOB - done up in New York subway kitsch - has an early, limited menu of pizza, appetizers, salads, and desserts.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
TUESDAY evening: two cities, two different scenes. In Baltimore, my Daily News colleagues watched the town's fragile peace fray as vandals once again brought fear to the "sad, tired, grieving, wrung-out" city, to quote a heartbroken friend who has lived there for decades. One hundred miles north, in Philly, I witnessed something more hopeful. Four community-relations police officers received awards from the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations at its annual ceremony to honor civil-rights champions and human-relations heroes.
NEWS
April 27, 2015
Chef's Table . David Gelb, director of the wonderful, must-see doc Jiro Dreams of Sushi, beautifully profiles acclaimed chefs from around the world. (Jiro is also on Netflix and a fantastic primer for the series). All six episodes on Netflix on Sunday. Tales of the Grim Sleeper . BAFTA-honored documentarian Nick Broomfield (Heidi Fleiss: Hollywood Madam) turns his lens to Lonnie Franklin Jr., who has been linked to more than 20 murders of minority women in L.A. Broomfield and his interview subjects posit that this was a community the authorities and media largely ignored.
FOOD
April 17, 2015 | By Victoria Mier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everything in Laurel restaurant is chosen with precise care by chef and owner Nick Elmi. The wall sconces, of mottled brown iron and imperfect glass, were made by sous chef Eddie Konrad. Elmi built each piece of the rustic furniture and painted all the walls a creamy almond. One of the servers provides the fresh flowers that adorn each table. While the porcelain dinner plates weren't made by the staff, they were made especially for the Passyunk Avenue restaurant to Elmi's exacting specifications by a local ceramics studio, Felt+Fat . There's something about knowing the wares were made "just for us," Elmi said, turning a plate over and running his fingers across the Laurel engraved in the porcelain.
NEWS
April 3, 2015
"VEGAN is going mainstream," blared an article on the food-trends site Food Navigator, noting that the number of references to "vegan" on social media rival those of "Coca-Cola," and citing study numbers on vegan eating's growing appeal to a "much larger base of consumers" beyond hard-core vegans. So, it's no wonder that still more animal-free products are hitting shelves (last week saw the debut of ready-made vegan "scrambled eggs"), and that plant-based offerings are showing up just about everywhere, flooding into the nooks and crannies of our culture.
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
A new heritage Heritage , a rustic combination of bar, restaurant, and jazz/funk venue, and arguably the boldest restaurant project ever in Northern Liberties, opened this week at 914-22 N. Second St. (215-627-7500), across from Cescaphe Ballroom. Owners Jason Evenchik and Terry Leach (Time, Bar, Vintage, Growlers, Garage) have completely redone the workaday building that housed Feast Your Eyes catering. Wide-open, warehouselike interior, reminiscent of the new La Colombe in Fishtown, has greenery everywhere: ringing the ceiling, behind the bar, and outside on the roof, as well as in a side garden that will have seating.
NEWS
February 28, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe it was the squad of cheerleaders they brought with them, chanting, "Burrito! Burrito!" Or maybe it was their sweet-and-savory recipe for apple, cheddar, and sausage breakfast burritos, giving new life to those presliced apple snack packs kids normally tend to reject in the cafeteria. Either way, for the second year running, culinary arts students from A. Philip Randolph Career and Technical High School were victorious in the Culinary Voice. The annual competition, organized by the School District of Philadelphia and the city Department of Public Health's "Get Healthy Philly" initiative, challenges district culinary students to develop nutritious and appealing recipes for school cafeterias.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Zappley, the exuberant young chef from West Deptford, fell just short in his quest for the title of MasterChef Junior on Tuesday night's season finale of the cooking show of the same name. Andrew, a seventh grader at Holy Trinity Regional School in Westville, watched the episode with teachers, classmates, and parents in Holy Trinity's gym. "There isn't anyone who wanted that prize more than Andrew," his father, Phillip, told the crowd. After the results were announced, Phillip Zappley and principal Elsie Tedeski presented Andrew with an award from the school, along with a framed collage of news clippings tracking his progress through the competition.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year ago, many at Holy Trinity Regional School knew Andrew Zappley as an outgoing student with a big personality, but few knew about his private passion - cooking. Now there is scarcely a student or teacher who doesn't know, and the school community has come together to cheer on the 12-year-old chef as he bakes, dices, and sears his way through the MasterChef Junior competition in the hope of winning the TV show's $100,000 prize. Tuesday night, teachers, parents, and students gathered in the Westville school's gym to watch the prerecorded episode of Andrew leading his blue team to victory in the "Restaurant Takeover" challenge, which had the young chefs running the kitchen of a Los Angeles fine-dining restaurant.
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