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FOOD
May 22, 1996 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I love sun-dried tomatoes under olive oil, but, being retired, I find them expensive. I have a bag of sun-dried tomatoes but don't know how to prepare them. Can you help me? Ray Cascella Penrose Park Dear Ray, Carla Fusaro is the chef/owner, with her husband Enzo, of the classic Northern Italian restaurant, Il Gallo Nero, which they recently relocated from Center City to Ambler. Carla says sun-dried tomatoes are similar to dried fruits like apricots.
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
THAT 6-year-old Davin Schulson can make his own lunch (homemade citrusade, chicken tacos and raspberry-watermelon frozen pops) is no surprise. The eldest son of celeb chef-restaurateur Michael Schulson (Center City's Sampan, Atlantic City's Izakaya and Ardmore's The Saint James) has been cooking at his dad's elbow longer than he can remember. "He was tossing edamame in a pot when he was 18 months old, when we appeared together on 'E! News,' " said his proud papa, also dad to Jordan, 3. Still, that Davin can stand in one place on a stepladder while single-mindedly squeezing fruit, mixing in maple syrup, loading frozen berries into a blender and then slicing - and sautéing - a chicken breast is somewhat of a miracle.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Authorities are turning up the heat on chef Guy Sileo. Montgomery County's first deputy district attorney yesterday called Sileo the prime suspect in the murder nearly two years ago of James Webb, Sileo's business partner and fellow chef at the General Wayne Inn. The two men were deeply in debt when Webb, 31, was shot in the head Dec. 26, 1996, as he worked in the offices of the historic inn in Lower Merion. Following the killing, authorities learned that Sileo and Webb owed more than $1 million on the restaurant, had been feuding over its operation and had taken out $650,000 life insurance policies on each other.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Joshua, 15, loves going hunting with his foster father. When the teenager bagged his first deer, using only a bow and arrow, they were both excited. Joshua's many other interests include camping, swimming, weight lifting, video games, and playing football. In the 10th grade, Joshua attends a vocational high school. He enjoyed carpentry classes so much that he may make this trade his career. He is learning auto repair. His brother Jason, 13, is in seventh grade and receives help in math and reading.
FOOD
June 4, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Nicola Shirley wants to be a cook. Well, cook may not be exactly the right word. The Germantown High School senior has set her sights a bit higher. "I want to be a chef," she emphasized in no uncertain terms. "I don't just want to cook. I want to learn the culinary arts. This is what distinguishes cooks from great chefs. " Quite an interesting view from one so young. And just how does this 18- year-old with the self-designed challenge intend to accomplish this? "Lots of hard work," she explained.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By John V.R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to its recent takeover by one of the region's best chefs, the Golden Pheasant Inn has a new lease on life. The 1857 Bucks County landmark had been in a state of senescence in recent years, but it was reopened Oct. 3 by Michel Faure, a native of Grenoble, France, who has worked at a number of the area's best restaurants, including Le Bec-Fin and the Bellevue Stratford in Philadelphia and the Hotel du Pont in Wilmington. Faure had operated the nearby Carversville Inn since July 1984, but he jumped at the chance for the Golden Pheasant's larger quarters and more visible River Road location in Erwinna.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Family and friends of James E. Webb, who co-owned the General Wayne Inn in Lower Merion, will hold a memorial service tomorrow night to commemorate the third anniversary of his slaying. The service will take place 8 p.m. at St. Timothy's Church on Route 452 in Aston. Carol Casey of Folsom, a friend of Webb's, said the family wanted to honor his memory and keep him alive in the thoughts of those who knew him. "It's also important, I believe, since it's an unsolved murder, to keep it out in front," Casey said.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Head chef Nathaniel Frison, 79, of West Philadelphia, a legend in the kitchen at the Old Original Bookbinder's restaurant on Walnut Street for nearly half a century, died Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A quiet, meticulous man, Mr. Frison developed the recipes for Manhattan clam chowder, snapper soup and bouillabaisse at Bookbinder's. "He was a wonderful person and a magnificent chef," said John Taxin Sr., the restaurant's owner since 1941. Mr. Frison began working at the restaurant in 1936.
NEWS
December 8, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Anna Pilla, who worked side by side with her late husband, chef and restaurateur Vincent "Cous" Pilla Sr., to make the old Cous' Little Italy a favorite dining stop for movie actors, mob bosses and other fanciers of Italian cuisine, died Saturday. She was 56 and lived in South Philadelphia. "When my dad first started, Mom was a waitress," said John Pilla, one of the couple's two sons. "It was like a partnership, in a sense. "He was always in the kitchen cooking. She would tell him what was happening on the floor, what people liked.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
CHEF BEN FORD has always thought outside the oven. Ford started cooking holiday dinners for his family when he was 12. He recalls the year he made salmon in the dishwasher. "It was a recipe that was going around in the '70s," he said, "I remember wrapping it in foil and putting it in the top bin and turning it on some cycle or another. My family seemed to like it. " Always a culinary tinkerer, the future chef was forever devising kinetic doodads that would turn the oven on and off or set some foodie notion in motion.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
For a city so steeped in German influence that German-inflected breweries and beer gardens, bakeries and candy makers were a big part of its personality, the Philadelphia of recent vintage had all but lost that culinary accent. Here and there - in Lawncrest and Fox Chase, on blocks of Sansom Street and in Old City and Brewerytown - you could find hints of the past in Moravian holiday clear toys and Bavarian pretzels and a sparkling butcher shop called Riekers offering weinkraut and Munich-style wieners.
FOOD
November 27, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'So why aren't we making real grilled cheese?" said chef Marc Vetri, who was visiting our after-school cooking class. "Well, we're going for something healthier," I said. Baked whole-wheat pitas stuffed with cheese and homemade tomato soup - a reinvention of the classic pairing. "You think these are healthy?" he said, grabbing the pitas and reading off the offensive ingredients: preservatives, enzymes, gluten. "So, what kind of bread should I buy in a grocery store?
FOOD
November 27, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Make it 'a true gratuity' The term "no-tip restaurant"- which is what people are attaching to the new Girard in Fishtown - is a bit of a misnomer, say owners Brian Oliveira and Cristian Mora. "It isn't that we are banning tipping," says Mora, who met Oliveira, a chef, last year while both worked at Parc on Rittenhouse Square. "We're not putting it on the guest to pay our staff's salary. We are paying their salary. If [customers] go above and beyond and want to leave a true gratuity . . . by all means.
FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Michael Klein, Philly.com
Fast-casual - the segment of dining that includes create-your-own meals (e.g. Subway and Chipotle) - is exploding. Jeff Hettinger, his son Steven, and business partner Felix Mailetta - who also have Viva Bistro in Wyomissing - slow-roast brisket, pork, chicken, and turkey, shred it, and add toppings and sauces for salads, rice bowls and sandwiches. Hence the name Shredwich . The first location opened last month in Saint Davids Square (550 E. Lancaster Ave., Wayne, 610-688-5700)
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carla Hall, two-time Top Chef finalist and cohost of ABC's The Chew , is enlisting 15 students from Drexel University to help her launch her first restaurant, to open in New York in the spring. James Feustel of the culinary arts program at Drexel says the partnership is a great chance for his students to work on solving real-world problems for an operating restaurant. Drexel created a "restaurant lab" class for the project, where students will source ingredients, compute costs, test equipment, and help with kitchen design and recipe development for Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen.
FOOD
October 10, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The mission to Montreal has become required eating over the last decade, its smoked-meat-and-poutine soul inspiring a generation of hipster-handcraft chefs from Brooklyn to Philly. But the quest for Québec profond requires a deeper drive into the heart of the province - 21/2 hours northeast to Québec City, where you'll find another metropolis in the midst of its own food revolution. More intimate than Montreal, and more deeply influenced by the historic stone-walled ramparts of its French-Canadian charm, Québec City has been energized in recent years by a generation of young chefs who have brought edgy bistro kitchens that take full advantage of the region's considerable artisan food bounty, from "ice ciders" to raw milk cheese, exceptional produce, and wild game.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
EVERY restaurant has its problems, but few are as specific as Marigold Kitchen's. Take the cold call the staff fielded the other day. "Are you still serving meat loaf?" the caller inquired. If this were a comedy sketch, GM Chris Albert would silently run down the modernist tasting menu - making deliberate note of elements like basil seltzer, black garlic and cubeb - and reply with a deadpan, "No, ma'am. " Meat loaf has not been offered at this West Philly BYOB for a decade-plus.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
CENTER CITY resident Courtney Lapresi took home the crown Monday night on "MasterChef," the Gordon Ramsay-hosted Fox competition show pitting amateur cooks against one another. Lapresi, who majored in dance performance at the University of the Arts, said that her artistic background allowed her to take on the challenges presented to her on "MasterChef. " "Fifteen to 20 years of dance performance prepares you for high-intensity competition," she said. "I'm used to feeling nervous and jittery.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
"TOP CHEF" VICTOR Nick Elmi is set to fight Parkinson's disease under the banner "Team Elmi's Dads. " The name, he admitted, makes him giggle a little bit. "It looks like I was raised by two dads," said Elmi, the owner of South Philly's Laurel (1617 E. Passyunk Ave.). Elmi is instead referring to his dad and his stepfather, both of whom suffer from Parkinson's disease. Elmi and his restaurant employees plan to walk in Moving Day: A Walk to Stamp Out Parkinson's on Oct. 11 (go to movingdayphilly.org )
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