CollectionsChef
IN THE NEWS

Chef

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 26, 2012
Who: Manager and co-owner with her husband, Greg Russell, of West Philly's Zocalo restaurant, featured on "Kitchen Nightmares," 8-10 p.m. Friday on Fox. From: Morelia, central Mexico Now: Williamstown, N.J. Age: 49 Kitchen connection: Mary and her chef-husband met as employees at Zocalo in the '90s. She made the tortillas and chips. He worked the line. In 2008, they bought the place. Having a 'Nightmare': The Russells aren't sure how chef Gordon Ramsay's producers found them, but the couple are glad they did. "It's necessary sometimes for someone to come and teach you how to run a business," said Mary.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
What follows is a summary of the restaurants reviewed this year, primarily on Sundays, but also in Thursday Food features. As always, there were second chances and revisits to a handful of restaurants to check for improvement. I went back to six places that seemed within striking distance of a rating change - those are designated with an asterisk. Good news there: One stepped up from two to three bells (Aldine), one moved from one to two (Ardé), another climbed out of the no-bells basement (Bonchon)
FOOD
May 22, 1996 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I love sun-dried tomatoes under olive oil, but, being retired, I find them expensive. I have a bag of sun-dried tomatoes but don't know how to prepare them. Can you help me? Ray Cascella Penrose Park Dear Ray, Carla Fusaro is the chef/owner, with her husband Enzo, of the classic Northern Italian restaurant, Il Gallo Nero, which they recently relocated from Center City to Ambler. Carla says sun-dried tomatoes are similar to dried fruits like apricots.
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Authorities are turning up the heat on chef Guy Sileo. Montgomery County's first deputy district attorney yesterday called Sileo the prime suspect in the murder nearly two years ago of James Webb, Sileo's business partner and fellow chef at the General Wayne Inn. The two men were deeply in debt when Webb, 31, was shot in the head Dec. 26, 1996, as he worked in the offices of the historic inn in Lower Merion. Following the killing, authorities learned that Sileo and Webb owed more than $1 million on the restaurant, had been feuding over its operation and had taken out $650,000 life insurance policies on each other.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Joshua, 15, loves going hunting with his foster father. When the teenager bagged his first deer, using only a bow and arrow, they were both excited. Joshua's many other interests include camping, swimming, weight lifting, video games, and playing football. In the 10th grade, Joshua attends a vocational high school. He enjoyed carpentry classes so much that he may make this trade his career. He is learning auto repair. His brother Jason, 13, is in seventh grade and receives help in math and reading.
FOOD
June 4, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Nicola Shirley wants to be a cook. Well, cook may not be exactly the right word. The Germantown High School senior has set her sights a bit higher. "I want to be a chef," she emphasized in no uncertain terms. "I don't just want to cook. I want to learn the culinary arts. This is what distinguishes cooks from great chefs. " Quite an interesting view from one so young. And just how does this 18- year-old with the self-designed challenge intend to accomplish this? "Lots of hard work," she explained.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By John V.R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to its recent takeover by one of the region's best chefs, the Golden Pheasant Inn has a new lease on life. The 1857 Bucks County landmark had been in a state of senescence in recent years, but it was reopened Oct. 3 by Michel Faure, a native of Grenoble, France, who has worked at a number of the area's best restaurants, including Le Bec-Fin and the Bellevue Stratford in Philadelphia and the Hotel du Pont in Wilmington. Faure had operated the nearby Carversville Inn since July 1984, but he jumped at the chance for the Golden Pheasant's larger quarters and more visible River Road location in Erwinna.
NEWS
February 22, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
There was cannon fire in Philadelphia on the morning of Feb. 22, 1797, as 16 rounds of salute - one for each state - rang out in celebration of the nation's greatest hero. It was the 65th birthday of George Washington, the "man who united all hearts," as John Quincy Adams called him. And with Washington's final weeks as president ahead, the event was celebrated with "more sincere joy" than ever, according to the Philadelphia Gazette. People of all classes paraded to the President's House at Sixth and Market.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Family and friends of James E. Webb, who co-owned the General Wayne Inn in Lower Merion, will hold a memorial service tomorrow night to commemorate the third anniversary of his slaying. The service will take place 8 p.m. at St. Timothy's Church on Route 452 in Aston. Carol Casey of Folsom, a friend of Webb's, said the family wanted to honor his memory and keep him alive in the thoughts of those who knew him. "It's also important, I believe, since it's an unsolved murder, to keep it out in front," Casey said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 22, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Matzo is known to Jews observing Passover as "the bread of affliction," and after eight days of eating the stuff, that title really starts to ring true. An overgrown cracker with cumbersome ridges and all the flavor of copy paper, it's an inelegant sandwich vehicle that tends to shatter under the pressure of a vigorous schmear. And yet, it turns out, matzo is also surprisingly versatile. At a time of year when other wheat-based foods are off the table, it can be a cook's secret weapon.
FOOD
April 8, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
Heading into its fifth year on the western bank of the Delaware River, Morgan's Pier has established itself as one of the most popular fair-weather venues in al fresco-crazed Philadelphia, serving an estimated 150,000 customers during its annual spring-to-fall season. DJ nights, live concerts, and craft beer tastings are de rigueur at the venue, run by Avram Hornik's Four Corners Management. But the food at Morgan's Pier, which opens April 21, has always been executed a little differently.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Sundance is history, Cannes is still weeks - and an ocean - away, and the Philadelphia Film Festival won't pitch its tent again until October. What's a movie fiend to do? Go to a film festival or two, that's what. A happy convergence of small but smartly curated festivals is happening in and around town in the coming weeks. The folks at the Philadelphia Jewish Film Festival launch their monthly series of "CineMondays" tomorrow with an impressive food-centric doc starring Zahav chef Michael Solomonov.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
It almost felt like old home week as Gizmo Guy made a mad dash to Chicago last Saturday for the International Home + Housewares Show. Several Philly-regional vendors were in the thick of things, showing new wares at Chicago's giant McCormick Center. Keeping the edge on. Dan Friel Jr. himself gave me the grand tour of the Chef's Choice booth. "Small electrics" - aka appliances - are in his blood, as dad Dan Friel Sr. founded CC's parent company Edgecraft Corp. in Avondale, Pa. in 1985.
FOOD
March 4, 2016 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
There has always been a lot for locals to love about our city's culinary soul. But as the city and its restaurants are landing on "best of" lists nationwide, it's clear the rest of the food world is sharing the love, with two Top Chef winners running restaurants here and local chefs regularly honored by the James Beard Awards. There are a lot of things driving Philadelphia's food scene forward, but one unlikely contributing force is Drexel University's Center for Hospitality & Sports Management.
FOOD
February 26, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
As the business day wound down at Material Culture - the former Germantown freight-train station that's now a showroom for furnishings from around the world - guests were just arriving for a Thursday-night feast. Chef Aliza Green greeted many of them with hugs: These are relationships that go all the way back to Philadelphia's first attempt at a restaurant renaissance, in the 1980s. Green was 27 in 1979, when she landed the job of executive chef at the trendsetting restaurant DiLullo's.
FOOD
February 12, 2016 | By Michael Klein, Staff Writer
Center City's residential growth is being fueled in part by empty-nester suburbanites seeking bright lights. Susanna Foo, the chef/restaurateur who raised her two boys on the Main Line and shut her namesake restaurant in Radnor last summer, not only has bought a condo in Rittenhouse Square, but she will work there, too. Foo and her son Gabriel expect to open SUGA - a portmanteau of "Susanna" and "Gabriel" - in the next two weeks at 1720...
FOOD
February 5, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of Feb. 2, 2016.   Craig LaBan: On a very sad note, there was tragic news out of Switzerland with the apparent suicide of chef Benoit Violier, the French-born chef of Le Restaurant de l'Hotel de Ville in Crissier who'd just been named "Best Chef in the World" by the French government. I'm sure much is still left to be illuminated about this, including more about his struggle to deal with the recent loss of both his father and his culinary mentor.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Richard Reiss was 14 and still in school, he began his cooking career at his father's restaurant near his home in Alameda, Calif., according to his autobiographical notes. "His family roots, a combination of Russian, Jewish, and Greek, meant there was a big emphasis on both food and family," the notes say. But for most of his career, he was "running GE's technology division in Maryland," he wrote. Until 2001. At age 55, he decided to become a chef, and enrolled in Johnson and Wales University in Providence, R.I., from which he graduated cum laude.
FOOD
January 1, 2016 | Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
A guy can eat a lot in a year. But I'm lucky I get to cherry-pick the best plates from one of the greatest restaurant cities in America. Of course, that makes it all the more difficult to choose my favorites. But when I close my eyes to remember the highlights from a year of restaurant reviews, Good Taste features, Crumb Tracker clues, and other stories, the most flavorful dishes return to my mind's table as vivid, hot, and fresh as the moment I first devoured them. And so here are my 15 best bites (in no particular order)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|