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NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
What follows is a summary of the restaurants reviewed this year, primarily on Sundays, but also in Thursday Food features. As always, there were second chances and revisits to a handful of restaurants to check for improvement. I went back to six places that seemed within striking distance of a rating change - those are designated with an asterisk. Good news there: One stepped up from two to three bells (Aldine), one moved from one to two (Ardé), another climbed out of the no-bells basement (Bonchon)
FOOD
May 22, 1996 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I love sun-dried tomatoes under olive oil, but, being retired, I find them expensive. I have a bag of sun-dried tomatoes but don't know how to prepare them. Can you help me? Ray Cascella Penrose Park Dear Ray, Carla Fusaro is the chef/owner, with her husband Enzo, of the classic Northern Italian restaurant, Il Gallo Nero, which they recently relocated from Center City to Ambler. Carla says sun-dried tomatoes are similar to dried fruits like apricots.
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylva Senat is right on time. Sous chef by 25, chef de cuisine or executive chef by 30, "and by the time I'm 40, I want to own a place," says Senat, 33, the chef de cuisine at Stephen Starr's stalwart, Buddakan, in Old City. He is a study in contrasts, this ambitious but inherently humble sophisticate who presents a striking appearance with his chiseled jaw and long dreads. A French-speaking Haitian native with Manhattan fine-dining sensibilities, Senat is a kitchen-trained, not culinary-school-educated chef who learned from some of the absolute best: Andrew D'Amico when he was at the Sign of the Dove; Marcus Samuelsson, who made Senat his sous chef at Aquavit; and Jean-George Vongerichten, who made Senat chef de cuisine at 66 Leonard Street and the Mercer Kitchen.
NEWS
February 22, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
There was cannon fire in Philadelphia on the morning of Feb. 22, 1797, as 16 rounds of salute - one for each state - rang out in celebration of the nation's greatest hero. It was the 65th birthday of George Washington, the "man who united all hearts," as John Quincy Adams called him. And with Washington's final weeks as president ahead, the event was celebrated with "more sincere joy" than ever, according to the Philadelphia Gazette. People of all classes paraded to the President's House at Sixth and Market.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Authorities are turning up the heat on chef Guy Sileo. Montgomery County's first deputy district attorney yesterday called Sileo the prime suspect in the murder nearly two years ago of James Webb, Sileo's business partner and fellow chef at the General Wayne Inn. The two men were deeply in debt when Webb, 31, was shot in the head Dec. 26, 1996, as he worked in the offices of the historic inn in Lower Merion. Following the killing, authorities learned that Sileo and Webb owed more than $1 million on the restaurant, had been feuding over its operation and had taken out $650,000 life insurance policies on each other.
NEWS
October 11, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Joshua, 15, loves going hunting with his foster father. When the teenager bagged his first deer, using only a bow and arrow, they were both excited. Joshua's many other interests include camping, swimming, weight lifting, video games, and playing football. In the 10th grade, Joshua attends a vocational high school. He enjoyed carpentry classes so much that he may make this trade his career. He is learning auto repair. His brother Jason, 13, is in seventh grade and receives help in math and reading.
FOOD
June 4, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Nicola Shirley wants to be a cook. Well, cook may not be exactly the right word. The Germantown High School senior has set her sights a bit higher. "I want to be a chef," she emphasized in no uncertain terms. "I don't just want to cook. I want to learn the culinary arts. This is what distinguishes cooks from great chefs. " Quite an interesting view from one so young. And just how does this 18- year-old with the self-designed challenge intend to accomplish this? "Lots of hard work," she explained.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By John V.R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to its recent takeover by one of the region's best chefs, the Golden Pheasant Inn has a new lease on life. The 1857 Bucks County landmark had been in a state of senescence in recent years, but it was reopened Oct. 3 by Michel Faure, a native of Grenoble, France, who has worked at a number of the area's best restaurants, including Le Bec-Fin and the Bellevue Stratford in Philadelphia and the Hotel du Pont in Wilmington. Faure had operated the nearby Carversville Inn since July 1984, but he jumped at the chance for the Golden Pheasant's larger quarters and more visible River Road location in Erwinna.
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Family and friends of James E. Webb, who co-owned the General Wayne Inn in Lower Merion, will hold a memorial service tomorrow night to commemorate the third anniversary of his slaying. The service will take place 8 p.m. at St. Timothy's Church on Route 452 in Aston. Carol Casey of Folsom, a friend of Webb's, said the family wanted to honor his memory and keep him alive in the thoughts of those who knew him. "It's also important, I believe, since it's an unsolved murder, to keep it out in front," Casey said.
FOOD
May 19, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Through tense silence at Avery Fisher Hall in New York earlier this month, he heard his name wash over him. Michael Solomonov. Pronounced correctly, even. Sol-ah-MON-ov . Beaming, he made his way to the lectern, where he was handed a bronze medallion bearing the visage of James Beard, attached to a yellow ribbon. Best chef, Mid-Atlantic region. Solomonov had no prepared speech for the James Beard Foundation, the Oscars of the food world. "I didn't want to lose again and go home with a speech in my pocket," said Solomonov, 32, who was nominated last year in the same category and two years ago in the category of rising-star chef.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Richard Reiss was 14 and still in school, he began his cooking career at his father's restaurant near his home in Alameda, Calif., according to his autobiographical notes. "His family roots, a combination of Russian, Jewish, and Greek, meant there was a big emphasis on both food and family," the notes say. But for most of his career, he was "running GE's technology division in Maryland," he wrote. Until 2001. At age 55, he decided to become a chef, and enrolled in Johnson and Wales University in Providence, R.I., from which he graduated cum laude.
FOOD
January 1, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
It's a custom among some Philadelphians to spend New Year's Day covered in sequins, walking along Broad Street, drinking beer and dancing. Others adhere to an alternative tradition, best practiced in private, involving abundant groaning and clutching of the head and the toilet tank. That is, of course, the New Year's hangover. How best to treat this annual affliction is a matter of some debate. So we turned to the pros - local chefs, who tend to put in late hours and, perhaps, partake in the occasional, end-of-the-night-shift drink.
FOOD
January 1, 2016 | Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
A guy can eat a lot in a year. But I'm lucky I get to cherry-pick the best plates from one of the greatest restaurant cities in America. Of course, that makes it all the more difficult to choose my favorites. But when I close my eyes to remember the highlights from a year of restaurant reviews, Good Taste features, Crumb Tracker clues, and other stories, the most flavorful dishes return to my mind's table as vivid, hot, and fresh as the moment I first devoured them. And so here are my 15 best bites (in no particular order)
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
What follows is a summary of the restaurants reviewed this year, primarily on Sundays, but also in Thursday Food features. As always, there were second chances and revisits to a handful of restaurants to check for improvement. I went back to six places that seemed within striking distance of a rating change - those are designated with an asterisk. Good news there: One stepped up from two to three bells (Aldine), one moved from one to two (Ardé), another climbed out of the no-bells basement (Bonchon)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2015 | Daily News Staff
The Philadelphia is heavily represented in the upcoming season of Gordon Ramsay's "Hell's Kitchen," which premieres at 9 p.m. Jan. 15 on Fox. Of 18 new chefs, three are from Philly and three others are from Upper Darby, Atlantic City and Lancaster, respectively. At stake - and likely at steak, too - is a head chef post at BLT Steak at Bally's Las Vegas. Contestants will face challenges such as a (rubber) duck hunting competition, preparing dishes for 100 high school students, a catered wedding reception for "Hell's Kitchen" sous chef Andi Van Willigan, and the fan-favorite blind taste test challenge.
FOOD
December 18, 2015
Camden Promise What a feast we had. The students voted to make fastest chicken parm (which isn't so fast when preparing for 18) and roasted carrots, with the new mixed-fruit cobbler for dessert. Ceanni Fernandez deftly cut five pounds of carrots, and not one sliver was left uneaten. Katherine Nunez, Naiomy Rodriguez, and sisters Emily and Jakelyn Hernandez tackled the fruit and found the pears slippery. Joaquin Estevez dedicated himself to chicken prep and everyone took a turn at clean-up.
FOOD
December 4, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
It sounds like a good problem to have. For families that observe both Hanukkah and Christmas, there's double the gatherings, double the gifts, and double (or possibly quadruple if said family combines Jews and Italians) the food. Yet this time of year can also be challenging for multi-holiday households. It may mean delicate calendar negotiations, tense budgeting, or surprising surges of usually dormant cultural or religious loyalties. We talked to three chef households about how they balance multiple celebrations and keep the party going through the solstice season.
FOOD
November 26, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Back in the swim Mike Stollenwerk, one of Philly's most visible seafood chefs before stepping out of the scene nearly two years ago, is back with 26 North BYOB (26 N. Third St., 267-239-5900). With the revived Bistro 7 down the street - where Michael O'Halloran has gone for romance with a renovation of his 11-year-old dinner-only, French BYOB - this is an intriguing time for the slice of Old City north of Market. At 26 North, the Jersey Shore-bred Stollenwerk (Little Fish, Fish)
FOOD
November 20, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Like many pro chefs, Joe Cicala cherishes returning to his childhood home for Thanksgiving. Just not for the reason one might expect. "It's one of the few days a year I usually don't have to cook!" says Cicala, co-owner of Brigantessa, who is also the chef at Le Virtù. That's not to say Cicala doesn't have deep feelings for the holiday he calls "my favorite. " As a kid growing up in Scaggsville, Md. (where, coincidentally, he worked in the local pizza shop with future fellow Philadelphia chef Peter Serpico)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2015 | Daily News Staff
For those who feel the warmth for Bradley Cooper , it's now official: He is so hot, he actually caught on fire. His latest film, in which he plays a chef (and which opens Friday), is called "Burnt," and, it seems, he was. In fact, both he and co-star Sienna Miller needed medical attention on the as-real-as-a-real-kitchen set. "There is the intensity of the kitchen in the movie," Cooper said. "Massive amounts of pressure, time pressure. It's hot and dangerous, and you better keep up. There's a lot of burning.
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