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NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Michael Klein and PHILLY.COM
Your restaurant is riding high. Day after day, plates of food go out of the kitchen looking beautiful and come back empty. Costs are in line. Employees are happy. Then one day, the chef sits you down. "I'm leaving. " Such is what happened recently at Fork, Ellen Yin's bistro in Old City. Terence Feury, who joined Yin to fanfare in January 2009, said he had a golden opportunity to invest in the renovation of the Old Swedes Inn in Swedesboro, Gloucester County, and to lead its kitchen later this summer when it opens as Tavro 13. Yin might have been surprised, but she could not have been shocked.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2011
Bio: 38; she's single, grew up in Media and now lives in Cochranville. What's new? The menu at Meritage Restaurant & Wine Bar (20th and Locust, 215-985-1922), where she is executive chef. Philly restaurant connections: Le Bec-Fin, Susanna Foo, Savona (her first chef gig). Starting out: At 22, as a server at the Village Porch in Springfield. Favorite ingredient: "Salt and pepper . . . I'm joking. I use a lot of citrus and a lot of zest. " On working with Georges Perrier: "A great experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philly's Elmi wins 'Top Chef' Nicholas Elmi scored major national culinary cred for Philadelphia Tuesday night by winning the crown on Bravo's Season 11 Top Chef , following in the footsteps of the Season 7 winner, Philly's Kevin Sbraga. Elmi, the owner of Laurel, a new BYOB on East Passyunk, beat his final competitor Nina Compton, the St. Lucia-born chef de cuisine of Scarpetta Miami, in a multi-course showdown in Hawaii. But Elmi, the former chef at Le Bec-Fin and Rittenhouse Tavern, had some sous-chef help from homie Jason Cichonski, the Ela chef who was booted earlier in the show.
NEWS
April 6, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Personable and sociable, 13-year-old Mikal loves to talk and enjoys meeting new people. He has a great sense of humor and gets along well with his peers and adults. Among his many interests are gardening, playing video games, and cooking. Mikal has two possible careers in mind: veterinarian and chef. He recently had the opportunity to increase his culinary skills when he visited with a chef at a hotel restaurant. Mikal received some cooking tips and in return created one of his favorite dishes - crabcakes.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Janus 88, a restaurateur and chef who was a leader in Philadelphia's restaurant renaissance, died Wednesday near his home in the Pennsport section of the city. Mr. Janus worked in the restaurant business for nearly five decades, capping his career with the opening in 1970 of Konstantino's, a restaurant at the corner of Second and South Streets modeled after a Greek taverna and featuring ethnic entertainment daily. The business was among those that helped boost the fortunes of the Head House Square area.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gennaro Gabriele, who left his home in Italy as a teenager and went on to become the executive chef at one of the Philadelphia area's oldest and most popular restaurants, died Wednesday at Grand View Hospital in West Rockhill Township. He was 101 and resided in North Wales. For 47 years - from 1924 until his retirement at age 75 in 1971 - he was executive chef at William Penn Inn in Gwynedd, Montgomery County. Mr. Gabriele was born in Arpino, Italy, and went to school only through the third grade because he had to help support his family.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There were many reasons the Upper Main Line YMCA campers said they wanted to be chefs and spend a day cooking with a real-life executive chef. But none was quite as practical as the one offered by Ryan Doto, 8, of Paoli, who arrived at Tuesday's cooking session at the Great Valley Hilton with his own "master chef" pink-haired troll doll. "I need to cook so my wife won't get mad at me!" said Doto, whose comment touched off some ribbing by his fellow young chefs. The 17 campers, accompanied by several day camp officials and a few parents, arrived on the outdoor deck of the Hilton shortly before lunch to cook their own meal under the direction of executive chef Sam Kenyon.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES - A chef who told police he boiled his wife's body for four days to hide evidence of her death was convicted Thursday of second-degree murder. David Viens showed no reaction as the verdict was read. The sister of his victim burst out sobbing. In a recorded interrogation presented by prosecutors during the trial, Viens, 49, can be heard saying that he cooked the body of his wife, Dawn , 39, in late 2009 until little was left but her skull. "He treated her like a piece of meat and got rid of her," said Karen Patterson, the couple's best friend who spoke with reporters outside court.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2008 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
HE MAY BE just 22, but in chef years, Jesse Vega is a seasoned pro. An executive chef at Gigi in Old City at the age of 21, the Queens, N.Y., native will soon head up the kitchen at Azul, a Mexican eatery opening in early March at 10th and Spruce. "When I hired Jesse, it was clear to me from the beginning that he had something special," said George Markakis, who owned Gigi before expanding to Azul. "His flavors blew me away from the start. " Although not formally trained, Vega has been cooking since he was allowed to use the stove.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the kitchen, preparing a five-course dinner for 800 people, executive chef Nickolas Petruse was as cool as the creme caramel he would sometimes serve for dessert. Dressed in his white chef's hat, a white tunic and black-and-white checked pants, the unflappable Mr. Petruse was a man who believed that food was an art form. Mr. Petruse, a resident of Lehighton, died Thursday at Hahnemann University Hospital after suffering a heart attack. He was 41. As a chef, Mr. Petruse didn't believe in shortcuts.
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