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Chemical Brothers

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget U2 at Franklin Field, the Stones at the Vet, and even Sleater-Kinney at the Pontiac Grille. The single most electrifying musical event I attended in Philadelphia this year, the happiest marriage of venue and performance, was the Chemical Brothers show at the Electric Factory in May. Techno, or electronica, or whatever you want to call it, isn't supposed to work live. But while busying themselves behind a bank of machines and never bothering to "perform" in a conventional sense, the Brothers - who return to the Factory Thursday - set bodies a-go-go like subatomic particles with a mind-bendingly physical attack of computer-generated samples, guitar-sirens and, of course, an abundance of "Block Rockin' Beats.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
The beauty of the Chemical Brothers' brand of dance music is that it playfully messes with the head while it beckons the body to motion. These days, the psychedelic aesthetic is far more pervasive in youth culture, and for that matter the culture at large (see advertising), than it ever was in the Summer of Love. Sunday night at the Electric Factory, the Brothers took the darkened stage to the sound of someone's languid rendition of the Beatles' "Tomorrow Never Knows. " The Brothers - Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons - waited while the line "surrender to the void" repeated like a mantra before they kicked in their set with "Hey Boy Hey Girl," and for the next 90 minutes turned the place into a lysergic disco.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | By Steve Volk, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Chemical Brothers came to the Electric Factory on Friday and laid down big, fat, industrial-strength grooves with the beats to get people moving and the colors to put them in a trance. But that's all they did, and that's the problem. You can't judge club/electronic music by conventional standards. DJs read the crowd and make choices accordingly, their "performance" becoming a moment-by-moment collaboration. The question "Did people dance?" is the ultimate determiner of a good show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Electronic dance music only recently penetrated the mass consciousness here, but it's been bubbling along in other parts of the world, especially Europe, for more than a decade. Following are a few classics of the genre, as well as some recent releases. KRAFTWERK, Trans-European Express (Capitol). This 20-year-old German classic distilled disco's pulse into pristine, machine-based music that was the precursor to techno. BRIAN ENO, Music for Airports (EG). Eno appropriated the term ambient to describe the slow, shimmering music he created on this image-rich, virtually melody-free soundscape, released in 1978.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The veteran British electronic music collective the Orb headed by Dr. Alex Paterson, which topped off a show at the Electric Factory on Saturday, is the inventor of ambient-house, a brand of often beatless music that's anticlimactic by design. An Orb show means to create a nexus between dance and sleep, a meeting place where dreamy almost-ready-to-crash psychedelics intermingle with the still-wired energy that comes from a long night of raving. It's chill-out music that brings the stoned conceptualism of Pink Floyd and Tangerine Dream to the dance floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2000 | By Lloylita Prout, FOR THE INQUIRER
Carson Daly is host of what cable show? Who married Msaada in Las Vegas? If you can answer either of those questions you are obviously an MTV voyeur, and, no doubt, will recognize DJ Skribble. He has only spun for the network's The Grind, Spring Break 2000 and . . . well, space is limited. But even resisters of "the loop" will be able to place this original member of the "Young Black Teenagers. " Followers remember watching him open for the Chemical Brothers or work the turntables for Biggie Smalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
There's something to be said for living off the grid. You can hunt your food with bow and arrow, read by candlelight, wrap yourself in animal fur for the long winters. You can study languages - German, Italian, Spanish, Arabic. And if you're a young girl named Hanna and you live just south of the Arctic Circle with your taciturn dad, you can practice hand-to-hand combat and weapon skills and do chin-ups together. And then, one day, you can go out into the world and kill a bunch of people.
NEWS
January 2, 1998 | by Sara Sherr, For the Daily News
This was the year that alternative wasn't. WDRE died and went to Y-100. Courtney Love switched from Village Thrift to Versace. Lollapalooza loitered around the country. Soundgarden broke up and no one noticed. The "new" Khyber struggled with its restaurant-versus-rock identity and it remains unclear who the winner is. And Philadelphians who were left-of-the-dial lost underground icons like The Original Sins and Third Street Jazz and Rock. The record industry pitted rockers against DJs in this thing called electronica.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
THE FIRST THING you notice at Cafe Chismosa are the chilies. The array of rusty-colored habaƱeros, guajillos, pasillas and anchos live in a thick glass jar on the front counter, alongside a scattering of skinny bodega candles and a pair of grinning Dia de Los Muertos dolls. Jugo Stevcic taps into this stockpile every day. He works them into a marinade for slow-cooked beef short ribs; grinds them with pepitas for a pesto-like pumpkin-seed sauce; blends them up for an en fuego Mayan concoction known as Xni-Pec , or "nose of the dog" - so named because the heat will likely singe your nostrils.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Top 10 time approached, there were a handful of albums I liked so well over a period of months that their berths on the best-of-1997 honor roll seemed secure. And sure enough, all five - by Sleater-Kinney, Wyclef Jean, Pavement, Ron Sexsmith, and Bob Dylan - made the final cut. The others weren't so cut-and-dried. Some, like Steve Earle's El Corazon and Missy Elliott's Supa Dupa Fly, scratched and clawed their way onto the list. Others, such as Cornershop's When I Was Born for the 7th Time, contained priceless singles, but proved too inconsistent over the long haul.
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NEWS
March 15, 2013
THE FIRST THING you notice at Cafe Chismosa are the chilies. The array of rusty-colored habaƱeros, guajillos, pasillas and anchos live in a thick glass jar on the front counter, alongside a scattering of skinny bodega candles and a pair of grinning Dia de Los Muertos dolls. Jugo Stevcic taps into this stockpile every day. He works them into a marinade for slow-cooked beef short ribs; grinds them with pepitas for a pesto-like pumpkin-seed sauce; blends them up for an en fuego Mayan concoction known as Xni-Pec , or "nose of the dog" - so named because the heat will likely singe your nostrils.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
There's something to be said for living off the grid. You can hunt your food with bow and arrow, read by candlelight, wrap yourself in animal fur for the long winters. You can study languages - German, Italian, Spanish, Arabic. And if you're a young girl named Hanna and you live just south of the Arctic Circle with your taciturn dad, you can practice hand-to-hand combat and weapon skills and do chin-ups together. And then, one day, you can go out into the world and kill a bunch of people.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2000 | By Lloylita Prout, FOR THE INQUIRER
Carson Daly is host of what cable show? Who married Msaada in Las Vegas? If you can answer either of those questions you are obviously an MTV voyeur, and, no doubt, will recognize DJ Skribble. He has only spun for the network's The Grind, Spring Break 2000 and . . . well, space is limited. But even resisters of "the loop" will be able to place this original member of the "Young Black Teenagers. " Followers remember watching him open for the Chemical Brothers or work the turntables for Biggie Smalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
The beauty of the Chemical Brothers' brand of dance music is that it playfully messes with the head while it beckons the body to motion. These days, the psychedelic aesthetic is far more pervasive in youth culture, and for that matter the culture at large (see advertising), than it ever was in the Summer of Love. Sunday night at the Electric Factory, the Brothers took the darkened stage to the sound of someone's languid rendition of the Beatles' "Tomorrow Never Knows. " The Brothers - Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons - waited while the line "surrender to the void" repeated like a mantra before they kicked in their set with "Hey Boy Hey Girl," and for the next 90 minutes turned the place into a lysergic disco.
NEWS
January 2, 1998 | by Sara Sherr, For the Daily News
This was the year that alternative wasn't. WDRE died and went to Y-100. Courtney Love switched from Village Thrift to Versace. Lollapalooza loitered around the country. Soundgarden broke up and no one noticed. The "new" Khyber struggled with its restaurant-versus-rock identity and it remains unclear who the winner is. And Philadelphians who were left-of-the-dial lost underground icons like The Original Sins and Third Street Jazz and Rock. The record industry pitted rockers against DJs in this thing called electronica.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Top 10 time approached, there were a handful of albums I liked so well over a period of months that their berths on the best-of-1997 honor roll seemed secure. And sure enough, all five - by Sleater-Kinney, Wyclef Jean, Pavement, Ron Sexsmith, and Bob Dylan - made the final cut. The others weren't so cut-and-dried. Some, like Steve Earle's El Corazon and Missy Elliott's Supa Dupa Fly, scratched and clawed their way onto the list. Others, such as Cornershop's When I Was Born for the 7th Time, contained priceless singles, but proved too inconsistent over the long haul.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget U2 at Franklin Field, the Stones at the Vet, and even Sleater-Kinney at the Pontiac Grille. The single most electrifying musical event I attended in Philadelphia this year, the happiest marriage of venue and performance, was the Chemical Brothers show at the Electric Factory in May. Techno, or electronica, or whatever you want to call it, isn't supposed to work live. But while busying themselves behind a bank of machines and never bothering to "perform" in a conventional sense, the Brothers - who return to the Factory Thursday - set bodies a-go-go like subatomic particles with a mind-bendingly physical attack of computer-generated samples, guitar-sirens and, of course, an abundance of "Block Rockin' Beats.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The veteran British electronic music collective the Orb headed by Dr. Alex Paterson, which topped off a show at the Electric Factory on Saturday, is the inventor of ambient-house, a brand of often beatless music that's anticlimactic by design. An Orb show means to create a nexus between dance and sleep, a meeting place where dreamy almost-ready-to-crash psychedelics intermingle with the still-wired energy that comes from a long night of raving. It's chill-out music that brings the stoned conceptualism of Pink Floyd and Tangerine Dream to the dance floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | By Steve Volk, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Chemical Brothers came to the Electric Factory on Friday and laid down big, fat, industrial-strength grooves with the beats to get people moving and the colors to put them in a trance. But that's all they did, and that's the problem. You can't judge club/electronic music by conventional standards. DJs read the crowd and make choices accordingly, their "performance" becoming a moment-by-moment collaboration. The question "Did people dance?" is the ultimate determiner of a good show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Electronic dance music only recently penetrated the mass consciousness here, but it's been bubbling along in other parts of the world, especially Europe, for more than a decade. Following are a few classics of the genre, as well as some recent releases. KRAFTWERK, Trans-European Express (Capitol). This 20-year-old German classic distilled disco's pulse into pristine, machine-based music that was the precursor to techno. BRIAN ENO, Music for Airports (EG). Eno appropriated the term ambient to describe the slow, shimmering music he created on this image-rich, virtually melody-free soundscape, released in 1978.
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