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Chemical Exposure

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BUSINESS
August 17, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An attorney has filed a lawsuit on behalf of about 6,000 employees who have worked at Rohm & Haas Co.'s research center in Spring House, seeking brain-cancer screening for them. Since 1980, 11 employees have died of brain cancer after working at the Montgomery County facility, and a 12th is battling the disease now. Last year, after an 18-month, in-house study, the company said it could find no link between the cancers and any chemical exposure, though it said such a link could not be entirely ruled out. Further study is ongoing.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two former supervisors for a city waste contractor have alleged in a lawsuit that the firm illegally dumped chemicals, violated antipollution laws, and supplied misinformation for inspections. The suit, filed Tuesday in Common Pleas Court in Philadelphia, says the problems occurred at the local plant of Houston's Synagro Technologies Inc., which has a $590 million contract with the Philadelphia Water Department to turn human waste into fertilizer and fuel. It alleges that Synagro's actions caused "risks of chemical exposure and explosions" at the plant near Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Dust in a metal-processing plant in southern Gloucester County apparently caught fire yesterday, causing two small explosions and sending five workers to the hospital with minor injuries. Contractors renovating a building of Shieldalloy Corp. on West Boulevard in Newfield were chased away by an explosion about 9:50 a.m. The explosion started a small fire, which in turn set off a larger explosion, according to Gloucester County Fire Marshal William Rieger. Ten people who were working in the building at the time were evacuated, and firefighters quickly put out the fire.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County Court judge granted preliminary approval yesterday to a proposed total settlement of $975,000 to nearly 1,000 plaintiffs who claimed they suffered from chemical exposure in the long-running Paoli Rail Yard case. Judge Robert J. Shenkin set a May 13 hearing date on the proposed settlement with Monsanto Co. (now Solutia Inc.), General Electric Co., and Westinghouse Electric Co. (now Viacom). The plaintiffs include people who worked at the Paoli Rail Yard or lived in the area immediately north of the yard and believe they suffered injury from exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | Daily News wire services
PIKEVILLE, KY. Eighth-grader suspended for wearing black lipstick Eighth-grader Karla Chapman wore black lipstick to school and found herself suspended. Then, her parents protested the suspension with a demonstration outside her school, and found themselves facing charges. Her father, Michael Chapman, pleaded innocent yesterday to charges of terroristic threatening and abuse of a teacher, misdemeanor charges that each could bring him up to a year in jail and fines of $500.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1991 | By Jennifer Gould, Special to The Inquirer
As the noise from nearby helicopters filled the air, Adam Bethea struggled to move through the fog and drizzle. With an oxygen tank strapped to his back, Bethea was enveloped in protective gear from his big yellow boots to his white, spaceman-like suit, bright green gloves and black-framed eye goggles. Bethea, 28, isn't a soldier in the Persian Gulf, but he has the same fear of chemical exposure that the troops are experiencing. He was equipped this day last week for a practical training program organized by his employer, Roy F. Weston Inc., an environmental-engineering and -consulting firm based in West Chester.
NEWS
December 19, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rohm & Haas Co., the Philadelphia chemical maker, is studying what appears to be an elevated rate of brain cancer among former employees at its Spring House facility. In a letter to the former employees, the company wrote that it knows of 10 cases of brain cancer among the 6,000 who have worked at the Montgomery County facility in the 40 years it has been open. Based on what they acknowledge is a rough calculation, company officials said that cancer rate was about twice that of the general U.S. population.
NEWS
January 9, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A study of 12 brain cancers among employees at the Rohm & Haas research facility in Montgomery County did not find any link between their disease and the chemicals they handled while on the job, the company said yesterday. The 18 months of research, led by company epidemiologist Arvind Carpenter and completed last month, also found no statistical link between chemical exposure and three additional cases of noncancerous brain tumors. The lack of any "smoking gun" does not mean the 15 employees did not get sick because of their jobs, at the 11 buildings near Route 309 in Spring House.
NEWS
August 22, 2001 | By Ericka Bennett and Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
One person was killed and two were injured in a two-vehicle collision yesterday morning that shut down a busy stretch of U.S. Route 202 between West Chester and Exton in Chester County until evening. West Goshen Township Police Chief Michael J. Carroll said a minivan carrying two people came off the northbound ramp at Boot Road onto Route 202 shortly after 9 a.m., crossed both northbound lanes and the median strip, and crashed into a southbound tractor-trailer carrying drums of chemicals.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | By Rachel L. Jones, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For some Persian Gulf war veterans who have fought a baffling set of chronic ailments over the last three years, the battleground has shifted to a different front - their sexual functioning. Early accounts of skin rashes, headaches and fatigue have been augmented by reports of a "shooting fire" pain during intercourse for gulf veterans and their partners, members of the Persian Gulf Expert Scientific Committee reported yesterday. Still other vets fear that prolonged exposure to toxic chemicals during the war may have caused birth defects and serious illnesses in their children.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dozens of firefighters who arrived at a train derailment in Paulsboro on Nov. 30 knew the toxic chemical vinyl chloride had been released into the atmosphere. But some of the responders say they were equipped with inoperable monitoring devices unable to detect the extent of their chemical exposure. The faulty equipment, those firefighters say, reflected the county's years-long "lackadaisical commitment" to emergency preparedness and led them to resign from Gloucester County's hazardous-materials team days later.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two former supervisors for a city waste contractor have alleged in a lawsuit that the firm illegally dumped chemicals, violated antipollution laws, and supplied misinformation for inspections. The suit, filed Tuesday in Common Pleas Court in Philadelphia, says the problems occurred at the local plant of Houston's Synagro Technologies Inc., which has a $590 million contract with the Philadelphia Water Department to turn human waste into fertilizer and fuel. It alleges that Synagro's actions caused "risks of chemical exposure and explosions" at the plant near Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
April 14, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a forceps in one hand and a scalpel in the other, Kim Hagerich peeled back the skin of a white laboratory rat. She extracted a glistening section of pink tissue that was perhaps a half-inch long - a mammary gland - and placed it on a small yellow tray. Mammary glands are of greater interest to Hagerich than to most people, as something went wrong with hers 2 1/2 years ago. She is a breast-cancer survivor, one of 11 who donned white lab coats at Fox Chase Cancer Center last Monday.
NEWS
May 18, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 10th person has died of brain cancer after having worked with leather-processing chemicals at Rohm & Haas, bringing the total number of mysterious brain tumors at the Philadelphia chemical-maker to at least 20 in the last four decades. The family of Olivia Ranalli, who died in March at 60, filed a wrongful-death lawsuit yesterday in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. Company spokesman Syd Havely said he had not seen the lawsuit but reiterated that a 2004 in-house study found no link between brain tumors and exposure to leather chemicals - or any other chemicals.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An attorney has filed a lawsuit on behalf of about 6,000 employees who have worked at Rohm & Haas Co.'s research center in Spring House, seeking brain-cancer screening for them. Since 1980, 11 employees have died of brain cancer after working at the Montgomery County facility, and a 12th is battling the disease now. Last year, after an 18-month, in-house study, the company said it could find no link between the cancers and any chemical exposure, though it said such a link could not be entirely ruled out. Further study is ongoing.
NEWS
January 9, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A study of 12 brain cancers among employees at the Rohm & Haas research facility in Montgomery County did not find any link between their disease and the chemicals they handled while on the job, the company said yesterday. The 18 months of research, led by company epidemiologist Arvind Carpenter and completed last month, also found no statistical link between chemical exposure and three additional cases of noncancerous brain tumors. The lack of any "smoking gun" does not mean the 15 employees did not get sick because of their jobs, at the 11 buildings near Route 309 in Spring House.
NEWS
December 28, 2003 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The two boys didn't put it together at first, but there were signs that Wayne Kachelries, their father and hero, was dying. In their Northeast Philadelphia basement, the boys started to beat him at Ping-Pong. On the basketball court, their father, a former high school star, began to stumble. And one day when the older son, also named Wayne, was about 10, he overheard some troubling news when answering a call meant for his mother: Dad had passed out at work. A deadly tumor, doctors soon discovered, was growing inside their father's brain.
NEWS
December 19, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rohm & Haas Co., the Philadelphia chemical maker, is studying what appears to be an elevated rate of brain cancer among former employees at its Spring House facility. In a letter to the former employees, the company wrote that it knows of 10 cases of brain cancer among the 6,000 who have worked at the Montgomery County facility in the 40 years it has been open. Based on what they acknowledge is a rough calculation, company officials said that cancer rate was about twice that of the general U.S. population.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County Court judge granted preliminary approval yesterday to a proposed total settlement of $975,000 to nearly 1,000 plaintiffs who claimed they suffered from chemical exposure in the long-running Paoli Rail Yard case. Judge Robert J. Shenkin set a May 13 hearing date on the proposed settlement with Monsanto Co. (now Solutia Inc.), General Electric Co., and Westinghouse Electric Co. (now Viacom). The plaintiffs include people who worked at the Paoli Rail Yard or lived in the area immediately north of the yard and believe they suffered injury from exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
NEWS
August 22, 2001 | By Ericka Bennett and Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
One person was killed and two were injured in a two-vehicle collision yesterday morning that shut down a busy stretch of U.S. Route 202 between West Chester and Exton in Chester County until evening. West Goshen Township Police Chief Michael J. Carroll said a minivan carrying two people came off the northbound ramp at Boot Road onto Route 202 shortly after 9 a.m., crossed both northbound lanes and the median strip, and crashed into a southbound tractor-trailer carrying drums of chemicals.
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