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Chemical Heritage Foundation

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BUSINESS
October 16, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Chemical Heritage Foundation and the Life Sciences Foundation, of San Francisco, both founded by retired University of Pennsylvania professor Arnold Thackray, said they plan to merge next month. The headquarters of the combined entity will be at the Chemical Heritage Foundation's museum and library on Chestnut Street in Old City, but the organization will retain offices on the West Coast. The Chemical Heritage Foundation, founded in 1982, had $5.4 million in revenue in the year ended June 30, 2014.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | Freelance
THE ASIAN ART Initiative pays tribute to the rich cultural identity and fusion of Asian and Western traditions with the large-scale instillation "Paper Play. " Jeonghan Yun and Choonhyang Yun's handmade, dyed bark sculptures reflect an appreciation for the order of nature and contemporary paper techniques. "The plasticity of tree, rock, mountain and creek shown through our body and mind are closely intermingled with our cultural background," Jeonghan said. Asian Arts Initiative, 1219 Vine St., through Aug. 17. Reception 6 p.m. Friday.
LIVING
June 19, 2000 | By Kelly Woo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Much of science in the modern sense began in the Middle Ages with alchemists' attempts to turn ordinary metals into gold. By the 19th century, alchemy had spawned chemistry, medicine, pharmacy, even dentistry. That connection was documented by artists of the day, whose works can soon be seen at the Chemical Heritage Foundation's newly renovated headquarters at Independence National Historical Park. In the collection of 500 works, science and art meet, and offer a visual, humanized look into the science of the 17th and 18th centuries.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1982, when the Chemical Heritage Foundation was a fledgling research organization starting out with only $50,000, it asked chemical engineers and experts around the country to serve as advisers on its "council of friends. " One of those who accepted the invitation was Donald F. Othmer, a chemical engineering professor at Polytechnic University in Brooklyn, an unassuming scholar who originally hailed from Omaha, Neb. When Othmer died in 1995, he left the foundation - then in West Philadelphia - half of his estate.
NEWS
October 3, 2008 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Banks will fail, as we've been reminded a little too often lately. But their buildings can still go on to lead long and productive lives, especially when they're constructed to weather more than a passing financial storm. Such is the case with the former First National Bank at Third and Chestnut Streets, a grand old neoclassical survivor that today begins a new life as a museum devoted to the history of chemistry, run by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The renovation, led by Peter Saylor of SaylorGregg Architects, is not only meant to restore grandeur to the historic Chestnut Street bank, but to the chemistry profession itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011
PHOTOGRAPHY may be the most familiar artistic discipline - every day we see photographs in newspapers, on Facebook, on billboards along the highway. Although most photography aims to document, not all photos are so explicit. Some photography provides us with a view of everyday objects and scenes so abstracted that we may not even recognize them. This month, LGTripp Gallery explores photography's multiple perspectives with "Focus," its fourth annual Abstract Photography exhibition. "Abstract photography is fueled by the desire to take an object and remove it from its original form," said Luella Tripp, gallery owner and curator.
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Lincoln McNeil Jr., the Philadelphia chemist who helped introduce the world to the best-selling painkiller Tylenol and later sold his family business to pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson, died Thursday at the age of 94 of heart failure at his Wyndmoor home. A grandson of Robert McNeil, who founded the company that became McNeil Laboratories in a Kensington drugstore in 1879, McNeil Jr. also was a major patron of many cultural and educational institutions, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Zoo, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of the Sciences and Yale University.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1993 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new breed of research chemist is making some fascinating discoveries. Not in the laboratory, but in the library. Interest in the history of chemistry and those who played a role in its modern evolution is growing. So, too, are the numbers of people researching milestone events in the field, and collecting documents, personal recollections and memorabilia. "History has always had a fairly low priority in the minds of most chemical scientists," explained Lawrence B. Friedman, a chemist-turned- historian.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles C. Price 3d, 87, a retired research chemist and former professor at the Universities of Illinois, Notre Dame and Pennsylvania, died of complications from multiple strokes Sunday at the Quadrangle in Haverford. He formerly lived in Villanova. Dr. Price combined research and teaching for nearly 40 years before retiring in the late 1970s. During World War II, while completing postdoctoral work at the University of Illinois, he participated in research on equipment to remove chemical warfare agents from water, finding substitutes for quinine - an anti-malaria medicine - and improving synthetic-rubber production.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day that you have the opportunity to buy a 600-year-old cookbook. It's even rarer that the ancient handwritten recipes detail how to create the Philosopher's Stone - essential in transforming base metals into gold. So it's hardly a surprise that James R. Voelkel, rare-book curator at the Chemical Heritage Foundation , 315 Chestnut St., was intrigued to learn that Joost R. Ritman's Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica, an Amsterdam library of philosophical arcana and "secrets," might bring a number of manuscripts to the market.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 16, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Chemical Heritage Foundation and the Life Sciences Foundation, of San Francisco, both founded by retired University of Pennsylvania professor Arnold Thackray, said they plan to merge next month. The headquarters of the combined entity will be at the Chemical Heritage Foundation's museum and library on Chestnut Street in Old City, but the organization will retain offices on the West Coast. The Chemical Heritage Foundation, founded in 1982, had $5.4 million in revenue in the year ended June 30, 2014.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child drops a silvery chunk of pure sodium into a flask of water. Almost immediately, the liquid starts to bubble. Sparks, flames, and clouds of gas fill the air. No need to react with alarm, however. It all takes place on the screen of an iPad. Lamenting the rarity of chemistry sets with serious, eyebrow-singeing chemicals these days, officials at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia commissioned a virtual equivalent. And it is smoking. ChemCrafter has been downloaded more than 224,000 times from Apple's iTunes store since it went live April 6, most of them overseas, said Neil Gussman, spokesman for the foundation, based on Chestnut Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day that you have the opportunity to buy a 600-year-old cookbook. It's even rarer that the ancient handwritten recipes detail how to create the Philosopher's Stone - essential in transforming base metals into gold. So it's hardly a surprise that James R. Voelkel, rare-book curator at the Chemical Heritage Foundation , 315 Chestnut St., was intrigued to learn that Joost R. Ritman's Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica, an Amsterdam library of philosophical arcana and "secrets," might bring a number of manuscripts to the market.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
Museumgoers will have the opportunity to brush up on a lot of dramatic American history around town this spring, with major exhibitions and events covering the Civil War, U.S. spycraft, the countercultural epicenter of 1968, the antilynching writer Ida B. Wells, and the black presence on the Delaware River - as both cargo and seafarers. In addition, the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, which originally blasted through town two years ago, is back for a month from the end of March to the end of April.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | Freelance
THE ASIAN ART Initiative pays tribute to the rich cultural identity and fusion of Asian and Western traditions with the large-scale instillation "Paper Play. " Jeonghan Yun and Choonhyang Yun's handmade, dyed bark sculptures reflect an appreciation for the order of nature and contemporary paper techniques. "The plasticity of tree, rock, mountain and creek shown through our body and mind are closely intermingled with our cultural background," Jeonghan said. Asian Arts Initiative, 1219 Vine St., through Aug. 17. Reception 6 p.m. Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011
PHOTOGRAPHY may be the most familiar artistic discipline - every day we see photographs in newspapers, on Facebook, on billboards along the highway. Although most photography aims to document, not all photos are so explicit. Some photography provides us with a view of everyday objects and scenes so abstracted that we may not even recognize them. This month, LGTripp Gallery explores photography's multiple perspectives with "Focus," its fourth annual Abstract Photography exhibition. "Abstract photography is fueled by the desire to take an object and remove it from its original form," said Luella Tripp, gallery owner and curator.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
By Babak Ashrafi Philadelphians celebrate the city's well-known place in political history, but we tend to forget our equally exceptional and fascinating scientific heritage. The same Enlightenment ideas that animated the Founding Fathers' creation of the United States also motivated many of them to apply reason toward understanding the natural world. As we prepare for a future increasingly driven by science, technology, and medicine, our history in those fields can provide invaluable perspective.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By BECKY BATCHA, batchab@phillynews.com 215-854-5757
IF YOU'RE READING this before 11 a.m., brace yourself. At precisely 11 a.m. today, thousands of children at local schools will jump into the air simultaneously to launch the first Philadelphia Science Festival. They're hoping the force of their landing will register on a supersensitive seismometer at the Temple Ambler campus. After that, brace yourself for a two-week science free-for-all. Between now and April 28, the festival is bringing 120 events to local schools, libraries, bars, restaurants, museums and other locations, including Citizens Bank Park for a day game in the upcoming Phillies-Brewers series.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2010
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . Tanya Murphy Dodd. Donations accepted. Closes 8/27. Leonard R. Wilkinson, Jr.. Donations accepted. Closes 8/27. Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. Barnes Foundation 300 North Latchs La., Merion Station; 610-667-0290. www.barnesfoundation.org . Docent-led Gallery Tours. Closes 8/29. Thru 8/31: Wed.-Sun. 9:30 am-5 pm. Sept.-June Fri.-Sun. 9:30 am-5 pm. Brandywine River Museum Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700.
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