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Chemical Industry

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BUSINESS
March 27, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite a steady stream of positive economic reports, a KPMG L.L.P. survey released yesterday found that the chemical industry does not expect its recovery until next year. In the survey of 38 senior executives and industry analysts at a conference this month, 44 percent said their business would begin improving in the first half of next year. An additional 14 percent said a recovery would not occur until the second half of 2003. "These results indicate we still have a way to go before a genuine recovery is under way in the chemical sector," said Ken Stern, global executive partner for chemicals at KPMG, an accounting and tax firm.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1986 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the chemical industry nationally, and for most of the large chemical producers with headquarters in this region, 1985 was a year of disappointing financial performance. Earnings fell 22 percent for the Du Pont Co., 32 percent for Hercules Inc. and 18 percent for Rohm & Haas Co. Pennwalt Corp. finished the year with a loss. Though the the economy generally was considered to be in a period of recovery, profits for all U.S. chemical manufacturers fell 18 percent. But after a tough year, the sixth in a row for the industry, chemical companies finally may be on the verge of better times.
NEWS
October 22, 2008 | Rick Hind
There are lessons for other sectors of the economy in the Wall Street chaos. For example, commonsense regulations reduce risk and protect the public. But the chemical industry today resembles nothing more than Lehman Bros. circa 1999. Since Sept. 11, 2001, industry titans such as Dow and DuPont have lobbied against requirements that they use safer chemicals at 7,000 high-risk chemical plants identified by the Department of Homeland Security. These facilities use and store highly toxic, volatile chemicals such as sulfur dioxide and chlorine gas. A terrorist attack or accident at one of them could form a toxic cloud capable of injuring or killing more than a million people.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Rohm and Haas, the Philadelphia-based specialty chemical company, will hold open houses at its local plants to try to improve both the company's and chemical industry's image. Vincent L. Gregory Jr., Rohm and Haas' chairman and chief executive officer, said polls conducted by the chemical industry show "the public ranks chemical companies somewhere near the Mafia. " "In South Philadelphia, the chemical industry would be ranked below the Mafia," Gregory told shareholders during Rohm and Haas' annual meeting at the Walnut Street Theatre, 825 Walnut St. Gregory said there is a public perception that the bad things that chemical companies do outweigh any benefits.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | By Laurie Merrill, Special to The Inquirer
As part of an attempt to establish a detailed emergency response plan for Lower Gwynedd, township officials have discussed an emergency preparedness program developed by chemical-industry officials. The discussion came after a presentation by a representative of Rohm & Haas, which operates a chemical plant in Spring House. Marshall Purvis of Rohm & Haas said the Community Awareness and Emergency Response (CAER) was a program designed to integrate other emergency plans as well as to provide outreach services to the community, including providing information on chemicals and other emergency plans.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1988 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
In the 1967 movie "The Graduate," actor Dustin Hoffman was advised by a middle-aged businessman where to find his fortune: "Plastics!" That same year, Arco joined with a chemical company to use a newly patented process for producing propylene oxide, one of the chemical building blocks for a myriad of plastic products. Yesterday, Arco Chemical, a seven-month-old corporate spinoff of parent Arco, made its first report to shareholders at its new world headquarters in Newtown Square, and related its growing fortunes in the plastics chemical industry.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1995 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rohm & Haas Co. yesterday reported record sales and earnings for 1994, coming back from "frustrating results in 1993," said J. Lawrence Wilson, the chairman and chief executive. Last year was a good one throughout the chemical industry, Wilson said. He predicted higher earnings this year, "if world economies continue to grow and raw-material costs do not continue to escalate. " The company also cited better productivity and smoothly running manufacturing operations as factors.
NEWS
March 28, 2013
Georg W. Claussen, 100, who was the longest-serving chief executive officer at Nivea skin-cream producer Beiersdorf A.G., died last Thursday in his hometown of Hamburg surrounded by his family, Beiersdorf said. He was the grand-nephew of Oscar Troplowitz, who invented Nivea in 1911, it said. Mr. Claussen joined Beiersdorf's management board in 1954 and was CEO from 1957 until 1979. Nivea, which Troplowitz developed from the discovery of water-and-oil emulsifier Eucerit, is Hamburg-based Beiersdorf's biggest source of revenue.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1987 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Revenues and net income shot up for Chemical Leaman Corp. in the fourth quarter and for all of 1986 as a result of an unusually strong increase in the volume of shipments, plus the trucking firm's aggressive marketing and improved service, company officials said. Chemical Leaman of Lionville, Chester County, a specialist in bulk- commodity trucking, also said it was helped by the acquisition of many of the assets and business of Coastal Tank Lines of Akron, Ohio, in the second quarter of 1986.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
J. Lawrence Wilson, vice chairman of Rohm & Haas Co., noticed late last year that his sales department received an unusual order. For the first time since the Japanese launched their assault on the U.S. auto market, a carmaker in Japan is buying a particular plastic from his Philadelphia-based company. As a result, Rohm & Haas now exports acrylic molding powder to Japan. The material is used in making taillights for cars that are shipped back to the United States. For Wilson, that order reflects a satisfying turnaround in the competitive position of Rohm & Haas.
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BUSINESS
January 11, 2016
The gang now running DuPont Co. , that incubator of 20th-century U.S. industry, is scrapping many of its Wilmington headquarters institutions, as if they were old Rust Belt factories. Glowing paints and super plastics, miracle fabrics and insulators, electronics and fuel additives and their often toxic by-products are just a few of DuPont's highlights. Its science and engineering created that new-car smell, the snug and cleanable feel of a mass-marketed American home, and the security and menace of a fully equipped American soldier.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IN 2012, A TRAIN derailment spewed a toxic cloud over the small South Jersey town of Paulsboro, prompting safety concerns and major lawsuits over the chemical industry there. Now more lawsuits are being filed over an invisible, unrelated threat some say is lurking in Paulsboro's water supply. "This isn't just a concern for Paulsboro, it's for everybody in the area," attorney David Cedar said yesterday. Cedar and his firm are representing three Paulsboro families against Solvay Polymers, a plastics and chemicals manufacturer in nearby West Deptford, claiming the company contaminated drinking water with dangerous chemicals.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.), plans Wednesday to introduce what he hopes will be signature legislation for his final term in office - a bill aimed at ensuring the safety of the many chemicals that Americans come in contact with every day. The measure would give regulatory officials the authority to evaluate the safety of the flame retardants in couches, the phthalate compounds responsible for the smell of new vinyl shower curtains, the bisphenol...
NEWS
March 28, 2013
Georg W. Claussen, 100, who was the longest-serving chief executive officer at Nivea skin-cream producer Beiersdorf A.G., died last Thursday in his hometown of Hamburg surrounded by his family, Beiersdorf said. He was the grand-nephew of Oscar Troplowitz, who invented Nivea in 1911, it said. Mr. Claussen joined Beiersdorf's management board in 1954 and was CEO from 1957 until 1979. Nivea, which Troplowitz developed from the discovery of water-and-oil emulsifier Eucerit, is Hamburg-based Beiersdorf's biggest source of revenue.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
Directives issued by New Jersey's water quality advisory board could be polluted if a bad bill pending in the Legislature passes. Assemblyman John Burzichelli (D., Gloucester) not only wants the New Jersey Drinking Water Quality Institute to use chemical industry-funded research. He wants it to ignore the possibility that the data might be biased. Burzichelli's proposal would also put more industry members on the board, which makes critical decisions about the level of pollutants it will allow in the state's drinking water.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Vic Brown
As much as I would like to deny it, I am creeping ever closer to retirement, and adding my name to the rolls of all of those who receive government assistance - in my case, Social Security. After 42 years of steady labor - two years as a high school chemistry teacher, 30 years in the chemical industry, and the last 10 years on the faculty and staff of Ursinus College, I have decided to retire from full-time employment in June. Thereafter, I plan to become an adjunct faculty member at Ursinus, do some consulting for industry, and tackle the huge stack of topics that I have been wanting to write about.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Maureen Swanson and Rebecca Roberts
Parents often start a new year resolved to take steps to improve their families' well-being: more fruits and vegetables and less junk food, more exercise and less TV. But there is a danger in our homes that parents can do little to address: Toxic chemicals in toys, electronics, cleaning supplies, cookware, and other everyday products that can find their way into small mouths and bodies. Doctors and scientists increasingly point to toxic chemicals in consumer products as contributing to serious diseases and disabilities, especially when developing fetuses, infants, and young children are exposed to them.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2009 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nancy Kolb, president of the Please Touch Museum, has tapped a source of charitable funding that's as unique to Philadelphia as cheesesteaks. To help with an expansion of the children's institution in Fairmount Park, she garnered checks for almost $1 million in the last two years from three Haas family charitable trusts. Kolb didn't have to fill out a slew of paperwork for the grants. And when the private trusts sent the checks, no press announcement trumpeted the gift. The process was discreet and efficient.
NEWS
December 11, 2008
Oil prices are a double-edged sword for the energy industry. High prices slow demand, but they still can boost profits, though the equation looks different to a refiner such as Philadelphia's Sunoco Inc. than to oil-rich competitors. "They like to say that they don't widen their margins, but when you've got a $100 barrel of oil and your margin is 10 percent, you're making $10. When it's $50, you're making $5," said Joel Naroff, chief economist for TD Bank N.A. Naroff said the whole energy sector faced lingering effects from this year's spike in oil prices above $147 a barrel, even though some analysts expect prices to stay in the $40 to $50 range next year.
NEWS
October 22, 2008 | Rick Hind
There are lessons for other sectors of the economy in the Wall Street chaos. For example, commonsense regulations reduce risk and protect the public. But the chemical industry today resembles nothing more than Lehman Bros. circa 1999. Since Sept. 11, 2001, industry titans such as Dow and DuPont have lobbied against requirements that they use safer chemicals at 7,000 high-risk chemical plants identified by the Department of Homeland Security. These facilities use and store highly toxic, volatile chemicals such as sulfur dioxide and chlorine gas. A terrorist attack or accident at one of them could form a toxic cloud capable of injuring or killing more than a million people.
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