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NEWS
September 2, 1987 | Special to the Daily News by Mark Ludak
Unidentified chemicals found last month at an abandoned tannery at Germantown Avenue and American Street in Northern Liberties are removed under police escort early today. I-95 was briefly closed to traffic between Aramingo and Cottman avenues around 5 a.m. as two environmental services trucks carried the chemicals - considered potentially explosive - from the former Custom Leather Services tannery to the Police Academy in the Northeast for disposal.
NEWS
August 3, 2010
By Robert Casey and Diana DeGette While our nation copes with the disaster in the Gulf of Mexico and the multiple failures of offshore drilling regulation that led to it, another potential fossil-fuel crisis lurks onshore. Hydraulic fracturing, also known as "fracking," injects tens of thousands of gallons of water, sand, and chemicals at high pressure into underground rock formations to release natural gas. The injected fracking fluids are known to include a variety of harmful chemicals, such as diesel fuel, benzene, methanol, and formaldehyde.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
By Howard Williams We all take risks, but accurately assessing them doesn't come naturally to us. From the Gulf of Mexico oil spill to the collapse of the financial sector, people have taken risks without fully understanding their potential impact. Toxic chemicals present another set of poorly understood risks that can have serious health and environmental consequences. Chemicals policy reform can help us deal with those risks. American businesses don't always have access to the information they need to make responsible decisions about chemical ingredients in their products.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | By Kathryn Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The owner of a wholesale chemical business agreed yesterday to remove all chemicals from a rundown Pottstown warehouse within nine months and to avoid storing them there in the future. The offer to rid the Nittany Warehouse of all chemicals came from Joel D. Udell, president of Pyramid Chemical Sales Co. in Ambler, said Pottstown Solicitor Chuck Garner. Udell was scheduled to appear yesterday at an enforcement hearing in Montgomery County Court over a 1998 agreement to clean up the dilapidated warehouse.
NEWS
June 15, 2004 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Environmental Protection will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. June 29 in Pottstown to discuss the level of chemicals in the air around Pottstown and Collegeville. The DEP has monitored the area since 2002 after residents became worried about the high cancer rate there. A 1998 study conducted by the Montgomery County Health Department and a 2003 study from the University of Pittsburgh found higher-than-expected rates of childhood cancer in the area. In a study released last month, stations detected 37 chemicals in the air, and one, trichloroethylene, known as TCE, was above the average for areas of similar size and industry concentration.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
State officials have charged a New Jersey man with illegally transporting and storing hazardous material at sites in Eddystone and Philadelphia. Dominic Zanghi, 62, of Cherry Hill, surrendered to officials from the State Attorney General's Environmental Crimes Section in Delaware County on Wednesday morning. He is accused of abandoning five trailers loaded with about 650 55-gallon drums of paints, baked enamels and various other hazardous chemicals, said Jack Lewis, a spokesman for the State Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Many pets become lethargic, develop respiratory problems, have poor coats or suffer digestive upsets because they have come in contact with chemicals, and not with bacteria or viruses. Guarding pets and families from harmful substances around the home is extremely difficult because we can't necessarily trust the labels on household, garden and automotive products to warn us of danger or advise us correctly about antidotes. A New York Poison Control Center survey early this year showed that 85 percent of all labels contained erroneous or inadequate first-aid information.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Pet owners should be particularly vigilant at this time of year when lawns and gardens are being doused with chemicals. Dogs and cats that run on treated areas can suffer temporary illness or long-term damage. Topping the list of dangerous substances, according to Dr. Jeffrey Brent of the Rocky Mountain Poison Control Center, Denver, are the "powerful bug pesticides . . . known as organophosphates," among them diazinon and malathion. These appear in many combination feeding, weed- and insect-control formulations.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
Dissatisfied with a two-page safety report on a chemical manufacturer's proposed storage and shipping facility, the Lower Gwynedd Zoning Board has asked the author to do further research and return next month with a comprehensive report on the materials and risks. William S. Wood, a chemical safety consultant hired by the township, wrote that the Amchem Products Inc. facility, which would replace two buildings built in 1917, "will result in overall improvement in safety and appearance.
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
A Superior Court judge in Burlington County refused yesterday to impose sentence on two firms that have admitted dumping chemicals illegally until more information on the environmental impact and cleanup costs are available. Earlier this month, Judge Paul R. Kramer had postponed the sentencing of Fleet Sales Inc. of New Jersey and Budd Trailers Division of Budd Co. of Pennsylvania until pre-sentencing reports were completed and a state Department of Environmental protection investigator could be present.
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NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
A South Philadelphia woman has been found guilty of animal cruelty for failing to get veterinary care for her cat, which was suffering from chemical burns and was near death, the Pennsylvania SPCA said Friday. Shivone Williams, 28, of the 1500 block of South Etting Street, was sentenced Thursday to pay a $500 fine and was prohibited from owning animals for 90 days. On June 17, the PSPCA was notified that the cat had been dumped at the front steps of a veterinary clinic in Grays Ferry a day earlier, said PSPCA spokeswoman Gillian Kocher.
NEWS
August 28, 2016
Authorities sent a hazmat team into a Burlington County building Friday that houses a manufacturing company, following a reported spill of an unknown substance. Dispatchers received a call around 10:35 a.m. about the incident at CVC Speciality Chemicals at 2890 Route 73 in Maple Shade. The spill was cleaned up by early afternoon, authorities said. One worker was injured when the spill occurred and taken to a local hospital, authorities said. The extent of the worker's injuries, and what type of substance had spilled, were not released.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
So maybe you kept up with the weeds in the spring. But now? How on earth did they get to be so numerous, and so big? If you're thinking that it might be time for an herbicide, but you're confused about whether that's safe, you have plenty of company. The most commonly used herbicide, glyphosate - a major ingredient in many products, perhaps most notably Monsanto's RoundUp - has been the subject of debate for years. The industry says it is safe. Critics, pointing out that residues are found in some of our food, warn of potential health effects and environmental woes, including the development of "superweeds" that are resistant to it, necessitating stronger chemicals.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
European officials recently took another step in the difficult process of regulating - and potentially banning - endocrine-disrupting chemicals, a growing concern because of links to health problems including infertility, birth defects, diabetes and cancer. In June, the European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union, presented the world's first legal framework for scientific criteria to classify the chemicals. Rebecca Simmons, deputy director of the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Pennsylvania and attending neonatologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, spoke to us recently about these chemicals.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, STAFF WRITER
A former public-works director in Chester County has pleaded guilty and was sentenced to two years' probation on charges of illegally dumping chemicals, according to a state prosecutor. Scott Cannon, 57, of Glen Mills, Delaware County, pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor violations of the Clean Streams Act for illegally disposing of magnesium chloride in the fall of 2012 while he worked for Tredyffrin Township. Cannon must pay $10,000 to Tredyffrin to reimburse the town for the fine it paid to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, according to a plea agreement a judge accepted Friday at the Chester County Justice Center in West Chester.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Ten days ago, with President Obama's signing of new chemical safety legislation, the last remaining environmental legislation of the 1970s that had not been updated got a makeover. It had been a long time coming. More than 80,000 chemicals are in common use, and previously the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency could call for safety testing only after evidence that there was a potential danger. As a result, the EPA has been able to require testing on only about 200 chemicals.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
As lawmakers demanded answers this spring about water contamination in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Paul Lutz began chemotherapy. Lutz does not live in the area with the tainted drinking water, which came from chemicals used on naval air bases. But he worked at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station as a flight engineer. Now 44 and retired from the military, he has multiple myeloma. As water contamination near the base attracts scrutiny, Lutz and others who worked there wonder: What about us?
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Upper Uwchlan Township officials agreed Tuesday night to allow a biomedical materials manufacturer to mix chemicals at a facility under construction in Eagleview Corporate Center. Despite opposition from some residents, the Board of Supervisors voted, 2-1, to approve a conditional use application that would allow DSM Biomedical to make silicone hydrogel, the base material used to make contact lenses in the new facility. The vote came after hearing from Township Solicitor Kristin Camp, who laid out some of the safety procedures that will be installed in the plant.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2016
Securities trades recently reported to the Securities and Exchange Commission by officers, directors, and principal shareholders of corporations based or having sizable employment in the Philadelphia area. Titles are as reported to the SEC. Buckeye Partners L.P. Clark C. Smith , chief executive officer, sold 10,000 shares at $71.05 on April 19, and now directly holds 85,476 shares. Comcast Corp. Arthur R. Block , general counsel, sold 1,002 shares at $61.25 on April 21, and now directly holds 44,169 shares.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Keystone Property Group is seeking a new namesake tenant for its Center City office building that now bears Dow Chemical Co.'s nameplate. The Conshohocken-based real estate investment firm has hired brokerage JLL to market space in the building, including a 200,000-square-foot continuous block. The lease could include naming rights for the Sixth and Market Streets property, JLL said in a release. Much of the space up for lease is being vacated by Dow, which announced in July that it was relocating 350 employees at the building to Collegeville.
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