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NEWS
September 2, 1987 | Special to the Daily News by Mark Ludak
Unidentified chemicals found last month at an abandoned tannery at Germantown Avenue and American Street in Northern Liberties are removed under police escort early today. I-95 was briefly closed to traffic between Aramingo and Cottman avenues around 5 a.m. as two environmental services trucks carried the chemicals - considered potentially explosive - from the former Custom Leather Services tannery to the Police Academy in the Northeast for disposal.
NEWS
August 3, 2010
By Robert Casey and Diana DeGette While our nation copes with the disaster in the Gulf of Mexico and the multiple failures of offshore drilling regulation that led to it, another potential fossil-fuel crisis lurks onshore. Hydraulic fracturing, also known as "fracking," injects tens of thousands of gallons of water, sand, and chemicals at high pressure into underground rock formations to release natural gas. The injected fracking fluids are known to include a variety of harmful chemicals, such as diesel fuel, benzene, methanol, and formaldehyde.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
By Howard Williams We all take risks, but accurately assessing them doesn't come naturally to us. From the Gulf of Mexico oil spill to the collapse of the financial sector, people have taken risks without fully understanding their potential impact. Toxic chemicals present another set of poorly understood risks that can have serious health and environmental consequences. Chemicals policy reform can help us deal with those risks. American businesses don't always have access to the information they need to make responsible decisions about chemical ingredients in their products.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | By Kathryn Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The owner of a wholesale chemical business agreed yesterday to remove all chemicals from a rundown Pottstown warehouse within nine months and to avoid storing them there in the future. The offer to rid the Nittany Warehouse of all chemicals came from Joel D. Udell, president of Pyramid Chemical Sales Co. in Ambler, said Pottstown Solicitor Chuck Garner. Udell was scheduled to appear yesterday at an enforcement hearing in Montgomery County Court over a 1998 agreement to clean up the dilapidated warehouse.
NEWS
June 15, 2004 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Environmental Protection will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. June 29 in Pottstown to discuss the level of chemicals in the air around Pottstown and Collegeville. The DEP has monitored the area since 2002 after residents became worried about the high cancer rate there. A 1998 study conducted by the Montgomery County Health Department and a 2003 study from the University of Pittsburgh found higher-than-expected rates of childhood cancer in the area. In a study released last month, stations detected 37 chemicals in the air, and one, trichloroethylene, known as TCE, was above the average for areas of similar size and industry concentration.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
State officials have charged a New Jersey man with illegally transporting and storing hazardous material at sites in Eddystone and Philadelphia. Dominic Zanghi, 62, of Cherry Hill, surrendered to officials from the State Attorney General's Environmental Crimes Section in Delaware County on Wednesday morning. He is accused of abandoning five trailers loaded with about 650 55-gallon drums of paints, baked enamels and various other hazardous chemicals, said Jack Lewis, a spokesman for the State Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Many pets become lethargic, develop respiratory problems, have poor coats or suffer digestive upsets because they have come in contact with chemicals, and not with bacteria or viruses. Guarding pets and families from harmful substances around the home is extremely difficult because we can't necessarily trust the labels on household, garden and automotive products to warn us of danger or advise us correctly about antidotes. A New York Poison Control Center survey early this year showed that 85 percent of all labels contained erroneous or inadequate first-aid information.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Pet owners should be particularly vigilant at this time of year when lawns and gardens are being doused with chemicals. Dogs and cats that run on treated areas can suffer temporary illness or long-term damage. Topping the list of dangerous substances, according to Dr. Jeffrey Brent of the Rocky Mountain Poison Control Center, Denver, are the "powerful bug pesticides . . . known as organophosphates," among them diazinon and malathion. These appear in many combination feeding, weed- and insect-control formulations.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
Dissatisfied with a two-page safety report on a chemical manufacturer's proposed storage and shipping facility, the Lower Gwynedd Zoning Board has asked the author to do further research and return next month with a comprehensive report on the materials and risks. William S. Wood, a chemical safety consultant hired by the township, wrote that the Amchem Products Inc. facility, which would replace two buildings built in 1917, "will result in overall improvement in safety and appearance.
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | By Jane Cope, Special to The Inquirer
A Superior Court judge in Burlington County refused yesterday to impose sentence on two firms that have admitted dumping chemicals illegally until more information on the environmental impact and cleanup costs are available. Earlier this month, Judge Paul R. Kramer had postponed the sentencing of Fleet Sales Inc. of New Jersey and Budd Trailers Division of Budd Co. of Pennsylvania until pre-sentencing reports were completed and a state Department of Environmental protection investigator could be present.
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BUSINESS
August 22, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chemours Co., a chemical maker split off from DuPont Co. last month, said it will close its titanium dioxide plant at Edge Moor, Delaware. The closure will idle 200 workers and 130 contractors, as part of a general reduction in production of the compound, which is used in PVC pipe, appliance paint and other industrial materials. The company will "redeploy" staff or pay them severance, the Wilmington-based company said.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Quaker Chemical Corp., of Conshohocken, said Thursday it paid $32.4 million to acquire Verkol S.A., a specialty grease and lubricants manufacturer in Spain. Verkol had $33 million in revenue last year. Quaker, which also makes lubricants and other processing fluids used mainly in metal-processing industries, such as can-manufacturing and die-casting, had $766 million in 2014 revenue. Verkol employs 64. Quaker employed nearly 2,000 at the end of last year. hbrubaker@phillynews.com 215-854-4651 @InqBrubaker  
BUSINESS
July 17, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Finishing its exit from the former Rohm & Haas Co. headquarters on Independence Mall, Dow Chemical told about 350 employees there Wednesday that they would be relocated to a suburban corporate center in Collegeville by mid-2016. The move is part of a several-step realignment of Dow facilities in the Philadelphia region that combines researchers at the former Rohm & Haas Spring House facility in Montgomery County and the business staff in Center City in leased space at the underused Pfizer pharmaceuticals complex.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Days before a New Jersey drinking-water panel is set to discuss a possible regulation for a contaminant found in Gloucester County water supplies, the plastics company suspected of emitting the chemical placed a full-page newspaper advertisement raising the specter of other potential sources. A main takeaway of Solvay Specialty Polymer's Thursday ad: A "voluntary and extensive" investigation over the last year shows there are "multiple sources in the region" that might be responsible.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Monell Chemical Senses Center, long known for its pioneering work on taste and smell, is getting a new director whose interests extend to other parts of the body. The research institute announced Monday that molecular biologist Robert F. Margolskee would assume the leadership role on Oct. 1, taking over from Gary K. Beauchamp, who is stepping down after 24 years. Margolskee, 59, studies the role of sensory proteins called taste receptors - so named because they were first found in the taste buds, but more recently discovered in the intestines, pancreas, and other organs.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Josephine Wilson has tried to shield her daughter from the "nasties. " The Princeton website designer avoided canned food because of the bisphenol A in the can linings. She skipped tuna because of the mercury. When she learned about flame retardants, she scrutinized her home for sources. She and her husband eventually replaced their couch and mattress. Their vacuum has a HEPA filter to remove chemicals that accumulate in dust. So when she saw a sign in the lobby of her pediatrician's office about needing subjects for a study on flame retardants, she knew she wanted to take part.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A government researcher who has studied intersex fish in the Potomac River now has found them in three Pennsylvania river basins, including the Delaware. The fish - males that develop immature eggs and other signs of feminization - are considered symptomatic of estrogenic chemicals in the water. Their discovery in the state indicates that effects of hormones and hormone-like compounds are more widespread than thought. The mutant fish could bespeak a deeper crisis, said Vicki Blazer, a U.S. Geological Survey fish biologist who conducted the Pennsylvania study.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melinda H. Keefe shared the world's horror when a painting by Mark Rothko, one of her favorite artists, was defaced with graffiti. Along with her initial shock at the vandalism came another emotion: a determination to do something about it. Keefe, a senior research scientist at the Dow Chemical Co., volunteered her expertise in researching what solvents might work best at removing the vandal's ink. More than a year and a half later, the successfully...
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Patsko, 86, formerly of Bryn Mawr, a chemical engineer, died Tuesday, May 27, of multiple myeloma at Kendal Crosslands in Kennett Square. Throughout his career, Mr. Patsko worked on chemical applications for the printing industry. Several were patented in the 1960s and 1970s. His work in photo engraving research, development, and technical sales took him to major newspaper customers worldwide. He was based at Master Etching Machine Co. in Ambler for two decades before moving to Park Forest, Ill.; Plymouth, Mass.; and Prairie Village, Kan. He returned to the Philadelphia suburbs and retired in 2000, his family said.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Quaker Chemical Corp. doesn't swing for the fences. No, the Conshohocken-based specialty chemical-maker likes to play small ball - watching costs, stressing customer service, making key acquisitions - to keep its balance sheet with a positive tilt. "Our goal is to score runs by hitting many singles," Quaker's chief executive officer, Michael Barry, told stock analysts last week. By Wall Street's measure, Quaker has been hitting the ball pretty well. Since sinking below $5 a share during the Great Recession, its stock has risen fairly steadily.
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