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Chemistry

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Documentaries about science don't really make for ratings winners. Those that are produced seem to focus on a few popular topics - evolutionary biology, medicine, astronomy. Chemistry seems left out in the cold. PBS hopes to change this ugly situation with The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements , a superb three-part documentary about the history of chemistry. It airs in one marathon sitting from 8 to 11 p.m. Wednesday on WHYY TV12. Narrated by Michael Emerson, best known for playing crime-fighting genius Harold Finch on CBS's Person of Interest , The Mystery of Matter provides a historical survey of chemistry from its birth as a distinct scientific field in the 17th and 18th centuries to the establishment of the famous periodic table and the discovery of radioactivity and the existence of subatomic particles.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1994 | Daily News wire services
Merck & Co. will be one of four companies receiving the first American Business Ethics Awards. Merck will be honored for its longstanding commitment to the research, development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products, its efforts to make medicines available to those who need them, and for providing an outstanding working environment for its employees. The award is given by the American Society of Chartered Life Underwriters and Chartered Financial Consultants and Forbes Magazine, which will profile the companies in its March 28 issue.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, Special to The Inquirer
Just light a match and blow some lycopodium powder into the flame. Voila! Fire suspended in midair. It looked easy, if a bit frightening. Tanya Pugh wasn't sure she wanted to try it. But she walked to the front of the room, cupped the chemical in her right hand and held up a match. Then she blew. Like magic, the fire appeared. And this time Pugh, a junior at Hatboro-Horsham High School, was the magician. "I thought I'd get burned," she said afterward. "But I didn't. " It all happened to the "oohs" and "ahs" of the student audience at Hatboro-Horsham High School, and was the exact reaction the presenters had hoped for. It's not easy to get high school students interested in chemistry, especially at 8 a.m. That's the job of the science road show presented by Susquehanna University undergraduates, who introduce the process of oxidation-reduction through magic tricks, mixed with a bit of stand-up comedy.
NEWS
January 28, 2011
ICE ON the streets formed quickly, so I'm led to believe the city didn't get enough salt down under the snowfall. Briny treatments don't cut the mustard when it's cold. It's going to be a long weekend and a rough Monday. For this second major hit, I'm thinking a C-minus for Mayor Nutter. Frank Graff, Philadelphia
SPORTS
February 16, 1986 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I think chemistry is probably the single most influential ingredient in developing success. " - Rollie Massimino Think of chemistry and you think of test tubes and bubbling cauldrons. You think of mad scientists brewing smoking concoctions in their labs. You think, of course, of the miracle of diet soda. You probably don't think of sports. You probably don't think of that mysterious ingredient that glues together collections of athletes from Medicine Hat and San Pedro and Brooklyn and somehow lifts them to the heights.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dominic M. Roberti, 81, of Bryn Mawr, a chemistry professor and longtime cancer survivor who helped others face lives as cancer patients, died Tuesday, July 15, of a heart attack at his home. Dr. Roberti worked for nearly 30 years at St. Joseph's University before retiring in 1995. He taught and held a variety of administrative positions, including acting dean in 1968 and 1969. He helped author the report that led to the admission of the first women to St. Joseph's in 1970. Dr. Roberti returned to teaching in 1971, and developed environmental and food-chemistry classes designed for nonscience majors.
SPORTS
January 14, 1991 | By Fran Zimniuch, Special to The Inquirer
Talent will take you a long way on the basketball court. But without good team chemistry, talent may not be enough to take you the distance. Solebury is a team that usually is blessed with a good amount of talent, but this year's edition has chemistry, talent, and an unselfish attidude that make the Spartans a force to be reckoned with. That chemistry and talent was evident Saturday night when the host Spartans (5-2) defeated Wilmington (3-9), 86-60. It was a balanced scoring attack by Solebury, led by 6-foot, 6-inch senior Rob Windsor, who netted 22 points and had 12 rebounds.
SPORTS
October 9, 1991 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Barkley huffs and says he is tired. He is tired from the grind of two-a-day practice sessions in training camp, a burden that will end soon, but not too soon for Barkley. "A lot of teams only practice once a day now," Barkley said, "but we have to practice twice a day because we have 10 new guys every year and it takes two hours just to learn everybody's name. " A year ago, Barkley knew the names in the starting frontcourt, and spoke of the sturdy play of Rick Mahorn and the steady influence of Mike Gminski.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Downingtown basketball coach John Walker is the first to acknowledge his team's shortcomings. "We don't have a lot of depth or height or amazing speed, and we don't have any incredible athletes," Walker said. But Walker is also quick to point out his team's biggest strength, an elusive ingredient he calls "chemistry. " That chemistry, combined with tight defense, good shooting and crisp ball movement, carried the Whippets to a 64-63 victory over West Chester East in a key Ches-Mont League matchup Tuesday night.
LIVING
January 2, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
In modern mythology, the piano bar - a staple of B-movie lore and noir novelization - is a lonely place, a dank environment where the detritus of society go to soak sorrows in sour mash while listening to rickety versions of "Melancholy Baby. " Pianist Ted Gerike and the habitues of the Society Hill Hotel on the corner of Third and Chestnut Streets don't know that one. "You know, in 20 years of being here five nights a week, I've never played 'Piano Man,' " jokes Gerike, 67. The hotel (doubling as bed & breakfast as well as bar/eatery)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Documentaries about science don't really make for ratings winners. Those that are produced seem to focus on a few popular topics - evolutionary biology, medicine, astronomy. Chemistry seems left out in the cold. PBS hopes to change this ugly situation with The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements , a superb three-part documentary about the history of chemistry. It airs in one marathon sitting from 8 to 11 p.m. Wednesday on WHYY TV12. Narrated by Michael Emerson, best known for playing crime-fighting genius Harold Finch on CBS's Person of Interest , The Mystery of Matter provides a historical survey of chemistry from its birth as a distinct scientific field in the 17th and 18th centuries to the establishment of the famous periodic table and the discovery of radioactivity and the existence of subatomic particles.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Rose Monica Katusz, 68, a member of the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia who taught here and did missionary work overseas, died Saturday, May 30, of cardiopulmonary collapse at Assisi House in Aston. She was a professed member of the Sisters of St. Francis for 47 years. Sister Rose Monica was born Kathryn Mary Katusz in Wilkes-Barre, and was reared in Dundalk, Md., where she graduated from the Catholic High School of Baltimore. She entered the convent in 1965 and professed her first vows in 1968.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rhys H. Craver Sr. grew up in coal country in northeastern Pennsylvania, and it made him "a tough guy," son Rhys H. Jr. said. In college, he was on the football and wrestling teams. And he was compassionate enough, his son said, that once during his college teaching days, "when a janitor needed a new dryer" for his clothes, "he gave him ours" and bought another. On Tuesday, June 2, Mr. Craver, 85, who retired in 1991 as a chemistry professor at Rowan University, died of dementia at his home in Stone Harbor, N.J. Born in Pittston, Mr. Craver graduated in 1947 from Forty Fort High School.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alice McLaughlin Davis, 83, of Germantown, a respected chemistry teacher at William Penn Charter School, died of cancer Thursday, April 16, at home. Her father, Frank McLaughlin, believed that girls should be given the same opportunities as boys, and he paid for her college education. She built on that foundation. A member of the first generation of her family to attend college and to receive an advanced degree, she later became the first female upper-school science teacher at Penn Charter and its first female science department head.
NEWS
April 21, 2015 | By Julie Kayzerman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Paolini and James Papeika both went out for shortstop during their freshman year at Holy Cross. "We ended up going with Joe at shortstop, but we knew right from the giddy-up that Paps was going to be a part of it for a long time," Lancers coach Steve Paolini said. "I told them that day, 'You guys are going to be joined at the hip for the next four years.' " The coach was right. The two juniors stand side-by-side in the infield, with Papeika at second base and Paolini at shortstop.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
George J. Beichl, 96, of West Philadelphia, a chemistry professor for five decades at St. Joseph's University, a prisoner of war during World War II, and a former president of the German Society of Pennsylvania, died Friday, Feb. 6, at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Born Aug. 20, 1918, in Brewerytown to immigrants who met in Philadelphia, Dr. Beichl was raised with a focus on education. On his deathbed, Dr. Beichl's father, a saddler, said he wanted his son to do more than work with leather.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MAN WHO will let a Florida king snake crawl through one sleeve of his robe and out the other is a man to be reckoned with. And then there was the iguana that had free rein of his home in Wayne and later Berwyn. In fact, the king snake had free rein, too, until his wife put her foot down. It is now in a tank. But Joel M. Kauffman was a man to be reckoned with for many other reasons, as well. A prominent chemist, researcher and medical writer, he would receive several hundred emails daily from people who just wanted to pick his brain.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Triumph of David was a mess. Old, original paint on the 17th-century canvas was faded and flaking in many spots. Newer paint from several inexpert restoration attempts had become discolored. Standing before the massive painting at Villanova University, art conservator Kristin deGhetaldi could tell all this with her experienced eye. But in order to bring the painting back to life, how could she tell where the old paint ended and the new paint began? The answer: a mix of art and science.
SPORTS
November 12, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
KHALIL ROANE should never have to carry another book through the halls of Ss. Neumann-Goretti High. His hands should be unencumbered, free to flip through his phone, look up stats and maybe even watch some game film. That's because the 5-8, 185-pound junior running back leads the city in carries. In the last two games alone, Roane has rushed 70 times (39 and 31, respectively). Oh, and he also plays outside linebacker. So, double-dipping must be tough, right? "It's not really hard," Roane said.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Tekel, 94, of Center City, a retired La Salle University chemistry professor who as a graduate student contributed to the Manhattan Project - albeit without his knowledge - died Wednesday, Oct. 8, of pneumonia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to his daughter Billie Elias, in 1944 Dr. Tekel was part of a research team led by Dr. Henry Hass at Purdue University called Project 220. The team was asked to prepare Freon-like materials called fluorocarbons, Elias said.
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