FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 15, 1994 | Daily News wire services
Merck & Co. will be one of four companies receiving the first American Business Ethics Awards. Merck will be honored for its longstanding commitment to the research, development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products, its efforts to make medicines available to those who need them, and for providing an outstanding working environment for its employees. The award is given by the American Society of Chartered Life Underwriters and Chartered Financial Consultants and Forbes Magazine, which will profile the companies in its March 28 issue.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dominic M. Roberti, 81, of Bryn Mawr, a chemistry professor and longtime cancer survivor who helped others face lives as cancer patients, died Tuesday, July 15, of a heart attack at his home. Dr. Roberti worked for nearly 30 years at St. Joseph's University before retiring in 1995. He taught and held a variety of administrative positions, including acting dean in 1968 and 1969. He helped author the report that led to the admission of the first women to St. Joseph's in 1970. Dr. Roberti returned to teaching in 1971, and developed environmental and food-chemistry classes designed for nonscience majors.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, Special to The Inquirer
Just light a match and blow some lycopodium powder into the flame. Voila! Fire suspended in midair. It looked easy, if a bit frightening. Tanya Pugh wasn't sure she wanted to try it. But she walked to the front of the room, cupped the chemical in her right hand and held up a match. Then she blew. Like magic, the fire appeared. And this time Pugh, a junior at Hatboro-Horsham High School, was the magician. "I thought I'd get burned," she said afterward. "But I didn't. " It all happened to the "oohs" and "ahs" of the student audience at Hatboro-Horsham High School, and was the exact reaction the presenters had hoped for. It's not easy to get high school students interested in chemistry, especially at 8 a.m. That's the job of the science road show presented by Susquehanna University undergraduates, who introduce the process of oxidation-reduction through magic tricks, mixed with a bit of stand-up comedy.
NEWS
January 28, 2011
ICE ON the streets formed quickly, so I'm led to believe the city didn't get enough salt down under the snowfall. Briny treatments don't cut the mustard when it's cold. It's going to be a long weekend and a rough Monday. For this second major hit, I'm thinking a C-minus for Mayor Nutter. Frank Graff, Philadelphia
SPORTS
February 16, 1986 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I think chemistry is probably the single most influential ingredient in developing success. " - Rollie Massimino Think of chemistry and you think of test tubes and bubbling cauldrons. You think of mad scientists brewing smoking concoctions in their labs. You think, of course, of the miracle of diet soda. You probably don't think of sports. You probably don't think of that mysterious ingredient that glues together collections of athletes from Medicine Hat and San Pedro and Brooklyn and somehow lifts them to the heights.
SPORTS
January 14, 1991 | By Fran Zimniuch, Special to The Inquirer
Talent will take you a long way on the basketball court. But without good team chemistry, talent may not be enough to take you the distance. Solebury is a team that usually is blessed with a good amount of talent, but this year's edition has chemistry, talent, and an unselfish attidude that make the Spartans a force to be reckoned with. That chemistry and talent was evident Saturday night when the host Spartans (5-2) defeated Wilmington (3-9), 86-60. It was a balanced scoring attack by Solebury, led by 6-foot, 6-inch senior Rob Windsor, who netted 22 points and had 12 rebounds.
SPORTS
October 9, 1991 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Barkley huffs and says he is tired. He is tired from the grind of two-a-day practice sessions in training camp, a burden that will end soon, but not too soon for Barkley. "A lot of teams only practice once a day now," Barkley said, "but we have to practice twice a day because we have 10 new guys every year and it takes two hours just to learn everybody's name. " A year ago, Barkley knew the names in the starting frontcourt, and spoke of the sturdy play of Rick Mahorn and the steady influence of Mike Gminski.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Downingtown basketball coach John Walker is the first to acknowledge his team's shortcomings. "We don't have a lot of depth or height or amazing speed, and we don't have any incredible athletes," Walker said. But Walker is also quick to point out his team's biggest strength, an elusive ingredient he calls "chemistry. " That chemistry, combined with tight defense, good shooting and crisp ball movement, carried the Whippets to a 64-63 victory over West Chester East in a key Ches-Mont League matchup Tuesday night.
LIVING
January 2, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
In modern mythology, the piano bar - a staple of B-movie lore and noir novelization - is a lonely place, a dank environment where the detritus of society go to soak sorrows in sour mash while listening to rickety versions of "Melancholy Baby. " Pianist Ted Gerike and the habitues of the Society Hill Hotel on the corner of Third and Chestnut Streets don't know that one. "You know, in 20 years of being here five nights a week, I've never played 'Piano Man,' " jokes Gerike, 67. The hotel (doubling as bed & breakfast as well as bar/eatery)
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Tekel, 94, of Center City, a retired La Salle University chemistry professor who as a graduate student contributed to the Manhattan Project - albeit without his knowledge - died Wednesday, Oct. 8, of pneumonia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to his daughter Billie Elias, in 1944 Dr. Tekel was part of a research team led by Dr. Henry Hass at Purdue University called Project 220. The team was asked to prepare Freon-like materials called fluorocarbons, Elias said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Tekel, 94, of Center City, a retired La Salle University chemistry professor who as a graduate student contributed to the Manhattan Project - albeit without his knowledge - died Wednesday, Oct. 8, of pneumonia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. According to his daughter Billie Elias, in 1944 Dr. Tekel was part of a research team led by Dr. Henry Hass at Purdue University called Project 220. The team was asked to prepare Freon-like materials called fluorocarbons, Elias said.
SPORTS
October 9, 2014 | By Julie Kayzerman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the left leg of junior forward Brooke Yarsinsky cramped up during Cherokee's field hockey game against Camden Catholic last week, teammate and senior forward Jessica Havers went immediately to her side. This came as no surprise. The two, close friends, have been there for each other throughout their two years of playing field hockey together. "It's nice to have someone that's always there for me," Yarsinsky said. "I know I can always count on her on and off the field. " The undeniable chemistry began long before field hockey.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | By Julie Kayzerman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For at least six girls on the Williamstown field hockey team, there's always someone special on the field they can count on. With three sets of sisters playing for the Braves - Allie and Jamie Trimble, Kamryn and Kate McKinney, and Gloria and Deborah Adebowale - the team dynamic and chemistry on the field have been an incredible sight for coach Kellyn Riley in her first year with the team. "It's nice to see them develop and push each other," Riley said. "The younger siblings kind of look up to the older siblings.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under the rapt stares of about 100 children and a statue of Benjamin Franklin, a staff member at the Franklin Institute poured liquid nitrogen into a bucket of water. A cloud mushroomed out over the sides and raced toward the youngsters. "Wow!" a chorus of surprised and delighted children squealed, reaching out to touch the indoor cloud. A few hundred more children scurried through the institute's famous heart and new brain exhibits Saturday, when the museum opened to more than 1,400 people free of charge.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
What If , a buoyant, bumpy ride of a romantic comedy starring Daniel Radcliffe and Zoe Kazan , asks the question: What if the right person comes into your life at the wrong time? Everything clicks, but one of the potential partners is already in a relationship, solid and satisfying. Is it possible for the two people to put aside physical attraction, and simply (or not so simply) be friends? In the film - directed by Michael Dowse from an Elan Mastai script that had been on the fabled Hollywood Black List survey of top unproduced screenplays - Kazan is a Toronto animator who lives with her lawyer boyfriend ( Rafe Spall )
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Loucks Rogers, 92, formerly of Norwood, Delaware County, a retired research chemist, died Thursday, July 10, of heart failure at Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne, Ind. He had lived at Peabody Retirement Center in North Manchester, Ind., since 2009. In 1996, he moved to Indiana to be near family. Born in Wilkinsburg, Pa., he lived in Pittsburgh until he was 9, when he moved to the Loucks family homestead and dairy farm in Scottdale, Pa. It was while working in the dairy that Mr. Rogers' lifelong interest in science was kindled.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dominic M. Roberti, 81, of Bryn Mawr, a chemistry professor and longtime cancer survivor who helped others face lives as cancer patients, died Tuesday, July 15, of a heart attack at his home. Dr. Roberti worked for nearly 30 years at St. Joseph's University before retiring in 1995. He taught and held a variety of administrative positions, including acting dean in 1968 and 1969. He helped author the report that led to the admission of the first women to St. Joseph's in 1970. Dr. Roberti returned to teaching in 1971, and developed environmental and food-chemistry classes designed for nonscience majors.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Quick! Calculate the half-life of a radioactive isotope, given a series of Geiger counter readings. Name a hydrocarbon based on its number of carbon atoms and a description of the chemical bonds. Spit out the number of neutrons in an isotope of tungsten. Tricky for most adults whose high school chemistry class was long ago. But what about Audrey Gallier, who has yet to take it? Easy as evaporating water, apparently. At the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts on Monday, the 12-year-old from Brookfield, Ill., correctly answered brain-buster after brain-buster to win the national You Be The Chemist Challenge, a chemistry-quiz contest for grades five through eight.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
THE Free Library of Philadelphia, always a source of food for thought, will start cooking for real Monday with the opening of the Culinary Literacy Center at the Parkway Central Library. The demonstration kitchen - with three ovens, a walk-in refrigerator, 16 burners and seating for 36 guests - will offer activities to educate people of all ages, not just in nutrition but in general literacy, mathematics and even chemistry. "People learn in different ways," explained Sandy Horrocks, the library's vice president of external affairs.
SPORTS
May 23, 2014 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
THE UNION cannot seem to find its groove at home this season. It has won only once at PPL Park, and the Sons of Ben voiced their displeasure during the previous two home games. Fortunately for the Union, it will not even play on the East Coast for about 2 weeks. They play the Galaxy at Los Angeles on Sunday and Chivas USA at suburban Carson the following Saturday. The team will stay in LA in between games, because it makes sense logistically. "We take this as an opportunity," manager John Hackworth said.
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