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Chemistry

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BUSINESS
March 15, 1994 | Daily News wire services
Merck & Co. will be one of four companies receiving the first American Business Ethics Awards. Merck will be honored for its longstanding commitment to the research, development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products, its efforts to make medicines available to those who need them, and for providing an outstanding working environment for its employees. The award is given by the American Society of Chartered Life Underwriters and Chartered Financial Consultants and Forbes Magazine, which will profile the companies in its March 28 issue.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, Special to The Inquirer
Just light a match and blow some lycopodium powder into the flame. Voila! Fire suspended in midair. It looked easy, if a bit frightening. Tanya Pugh wasn't sure she wanted to try it. But she walked to the front of the room, cupped the chemical in her right hand and held up a match. Then she blew. Like magic, the fire appeared. And this time Pugh, a junior at Hatboro-Horsham High School, was the magician. "I thought I'd get burned," she said afterward. "But I didn't. " It all happened to the "oohs" and "ahs" of the student audience at Hatboro-Horsham High School, and was the exact reaction the presenters had hoped for. It's not easy to get high school students interested in chemistry, especially at 8 a.m. That's the job of the science road show presented by Susquehanna University undergraduates, who introduce the process of oxidation-reduction through magic tricks, mixed with a bit of stand-up comedy.
NEWS
January 28, 2011
ICE ON the streets formed quickly, so I'm led to believe the city didn't get enough salt down under the snowfall. Briny treatments don't cut the mustard when it's cold. It's going to be a long weekend and a rough Monday. For this second major hit, I'm thinking a C-minus for Mayor Nutter. Frank Graff, Philadelphia
SPORTS
February 16, 1986 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I think chemistry is probably the single most influential ingredient in developing success. " - Rollie Massimino Think of chemistry and you think of test tubes and bubbling cauldrons. You think of mad scientists brewing smoking concoctions in their labs. You think, of course, of the miracle of diet soda. You probably don't think of sports. You probably don't think of that mysterious ingredient that glues together collections of athletes from Medicine Hat and San Pedro and Brooklyn and somehow lifts them to the heights.
SPORTS
January 14, 1991 | By Fran Zimniuch, Special to The Inquirer
Talent will take you a long way on the basketball court. But without good team chemistry, talent may not be enough to take you the distance. Solebury is a team that usually is blessed with a good amount of talent, but this year's edition has chemistry, talent, and an unselfish attidude that make the Spartans a force to be reckoned with. That chemistry and talent was evident Saturday night when the host Spartans (5-2) defeated Wilmington (3-9), 86-60. It was a balanced scoring attack by Solebury, led by 6-foot, 6-inch senior Rob Windsor, who netted 22 points and had 12 rebounds.
SPORTS
October 9, 1991 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Barkley huffs and says he is tired. He is tired from the grind of two-a-day practice sessions in training camp, a burden that will end soon, but not too soon for Barkley. "A lot of teams only practice once a day now," Barkley said, "but we have to practice twice a day because we have 10 new guys every year and it takes two hours just to learn everybody's name. " A year ago, Barkley knew the names in the starting frontcourt, and spoke of the sturdy play of Rick Mahorn and the steady influence of Mike Gminski.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Downingtown basketball coach John Walker is the first to acknowledge his team's shortcomings. "We don't have a lot of depth or height or amazing speed, and we don't have any incredible athletes," Walker said. But Walker is also quick to point out his team's biggest strength, an elusive ingredient he calls "chemistry. " That chemistry, combined with tight defense, good shooting and crisp ball movement, carried the Whippets to a 64-63 victory over West Chester East in a key Ches-Mont League matchup Tuesday night.
LIVING
January 2, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
In modern mythology, the piano bar - a staple of B-movie lore and noir novelization - is a lonely place, a dank environment where the detritus of society go to soak sorrows in sour mash while listening to rickety versions of "Melancholy Baby. " Pianist Ted Gerike and the habitues of the Society Hill Hotel on the corner of Third and Chestnut Streets don't know that one. "You know, in 20 years of being here five nights a week, I've never played 'Piano Man,' " jokes Gerike, 67. The hotel (doubling as bed & breakfast as well as bar/eatery)
SPORTS
January 12, 1996 | by John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
The astounding thing about the Chicago Bulls - who are making a mockery of the rest of the NBA - is that going into the season, they had many of the same questions about themselves that others did. But when a team jumps out to a NBA-record 29-3 start and has a legitimate shot at becoming the league's first 70-victory team, potential concerns tend to get placed on the back burner. So for the last 2 1/2 months, while the Bulls have blown through the league, there have been no stories about Michael Jordan losing a step, Scottie Pippen arguing with management or Dennis Rodman acting like a space cadet.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"DIVERGENT" star Theo James said the first step toward building good romantic chemistry with co-star Shailene Woodley was ignoring her. "I definitely held myself back a bit in the early stages," said James, who thought it would help the on-screen relationship if he stayed behind his character's reserved facade. He plays the mysterious Four, a sort of drill sergeant who supervises the brutal training of recruits (Woodley included) wishing to join the most militant of the many factions sharing control of a post-apocalyptic Chicago.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark M. Chamberlain, 82, a former Rowan University chemistry professor who served as the school's president for 15 change-filled years when it was Glassboro State College, died of natural causes Saturday, March 29. Dr. Chamberlain, a resident of Williamstown for the last 26 years, is credited with leading the growth of the school from a teachers' college to a multipurpose institution from 1969 to 1984. "Mark was a wonderful and caring man and visionary leader who helped position the university for the growth and change it has enjoyed in recent years," said Rowan president Ali A. Houshmand.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"DIVERGENT" star Theo James said the first step toward building good romantic chemistry with co-star Shailene Woodley was ignoring her. "I definitely held myself back a bit in the early stages," said James, who thought it would help the on-screen relationship if he stayed behind his character's reserved facade. He plays the mysterious Four, a sort of drill sergeant who supervises the brutal training of recruits (Woodley included) wishing to join the most militant of the many factions sharing control of a post-apocalyptic Chicago.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Mary George O'Reilly, 95, a former president of Rosemont College whose dedication to the school spanned 60 years, died Monday, March 10, of heart failure at Holy Child Center, Rosemont. Sister Mary George took over the top job in the 1960s when the Catholic college on the Main Line was entering its fifth decade. It needed better facilities. Using her people skills, legendary ability to remember names, and popularity, Sister Mary George spawned a mini-building boom on campus.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Clubhouse chemistry was one of the hot-button topics during the Phillies' long wait for the start of spring training after an abysmal 2013 season. Veteran pitchers Cole Hamels and Jonathan Papelbon weighed in on the issue during the offseason, essentially agreeing that the team's bond was fractured. Hamels revisited the subject Wednesday by saying this season feels different already. Papelbon is likely to have his say on the matter at some point during these early days of spring training.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cecile Kaplan Dalton, 77, of Radnor, a retired chemistry teacher at Philadelphia-area colleges, died Wednesday, Jan. 8, in her sleep after surgery for breast cancer in Houston. For many years, Dr. Dalton taught organic chemistry at Swarthmore College, Bryn Mawr College, and Temple University. She had a passion for teaching the serious, focused postbaccalaureate students who returned to college to complete the requirements for medical school. "She enjoyed helping them pursue their dream of becoming a doctor," said her son Aaron.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Gertrude Mary Kerin never hesitated when called upon for prayer, except once in 2008 when a coworker and longtime friend made an unusual request. John Colman, head of Gloucester Catholic High School, wanted her to pray for the Phillies to win the World Series. Sister Gertrude Mary reluctantly agreed. The Phillies beat the Tampa Bay Rays, 4-3, in Game 5. "She was the one who turned the corner for the Phillies," Colman said Monday, recalling a woman who dedicated her life to serving God and caring for children.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day that you have the opportunity to buy a 600-year-old cookbook. It's even rarer that the ancient handwritten recipes detail how to create the Philosopher's Stone - essential in transforming base metals into gold. So it's hardly a surprise that James R. Voelkel, rare-book curator at the Chemical Heritage Foundation , 315 Chestnut St., was intrigued to learn that Joost R. Ritman's Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica, an Amsterdam library of philosophical arcana and "secrets," might bring a number of manuscripts to the market.
SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | By Joey Cranney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether it's singing Miley Cyrus songs on the bus or upsetting top seeds in the district and state tournaments, the Hatboro-Horsham field hockey team has been making a lot of noise recently. The singing is what third-year coach Laura Swezey said is a "pleasant" example of the chemistry that she points to as the catalyst for her team's recent upsets of some of the area's best squads. For the players, singing as a team before and after games is a way to stay motivated and remain positive.
SPORTS
October 11, 2013 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
On paper, it was hard not to pay attention to the seniors who graduated, a strong class led by current college players such as Clare MacAdam (Navy) and Ashley Shackleford (Holy Family). The marquee names are gone, yes. The team is young, true. But to focus on that, according to coach Sergio Torres, is to overlook the biggest reason the Holy Cross girls' soccer team opened the season on a 10-0-1 tear. "It's our chemistry," Torres said. "I'd say it's at an all-time high. And the girls are playing so well.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfonso R. Gennaro, 87, who spent more than 50 years at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia died of renal cell cancer Sunday, Sept. 8, at his home in Ambler. Mr. Gennaro was at the university so long he witnessed its name change. He was an undergraduate back when it was known as the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, and was a professor when it got its new identity in 1997. Before his college career began, the Philadelphia native served in the Navy from 1944 to 1946 and saw action in the Pacific Theatre during World War II. The electronic technician's mate was aboard the USS Blue Ridge when the vessel took part in the liberation of the Philippines.
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