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Chemistry

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BUSINESS
March 15, 1994 | Daily News wire services
Merck & Co. will be one of four companies receiving the first American Business Ethics Awards. Merck will be honored for its longstanding commitment to the research, development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products, its efforts to make medicines available to those who need them, and for providing an outstanding working environment for its employees. The award is given by the American Society of Chartered Life Underwriters and Chartered Financial Consultants and Forbes Magazine, which will profile the companies in its March 28 issue.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, Special to The Inquirer
Just light a match and blow some lycopodium powder into the flame. Voila! Fire suspended in midair. It looked easy, if a bit frightening. Tanya Pugh wasn't sure she wanted to try it. But she walked to the front of the room, cupped the chemical in her right hand and held up a match. Then she blew. Like magic, the fire appeared. And this time Pugh, a junior at Hatboro-Horsham High School, was the magician. "I thought I'd get burned," she said afterward. "But I didn't. " It all happened to the "oohs" and "ahs" of the student audience at Hatboro-Horsham High School, and was the exact reaction the presenters had hoped for. It's not easy to get high school students interested in chemistry, especially at 8 a.m. That's the job of the science road show presented by Susquehanna University undergraduates, who introduce the process of oxidation-reduction through magic tricks, mixed with a bit of stand-up comedy.
NEWS
January 28, 2011
ICE ON the streets formed quickly, so I'm led to believe the city didn't get enough salt down under the snowfall. Briny treatments don't cut the mustard when it's cold. It's going to be a long weekend and a rough Monday. For this second major hit, I'm thinking a C-minus for Mayor Nutter. Frank Graff, Philadelphia
SPORTS
February 16, 1986 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I think chemistry is probably the single most influential ingredient in developing success. " - Rollie Massimino Think of chemistry and you think of test tubes and bubbling cauldrons. You think of mad scientists brewing smoking concoctions in their labs. You think, of course, of the miracle of diet soda. You probably don't think of sports. You probably don't think of that mysterious ingredient that glues together collections of athletes from Medicine Hat and San Pedro and Brooklyn and somehow lifts them to the heights.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dominic M. Roberti, 81, of Bryn Mawr, a chemistry professor and longtime cancer survivor who helped others face lives as cancer patients, died Tuesday, July 15, of a heart attack at his home. Dr. Roberti worked for nearly 30 years at St. Joseph's University before retiring in 1995. He taught and held a variety of administrative positions, including acting dean in 1968 and 1969. He helped author the report that led to the admission of the first women to St. Joseph's in 1970. Dr. Roberti returned to teaching in 1971, and developed environmental and food-chemistry classes designed for nonscience majors.
SPORTS
January 14, 1991 | By Fran Zimniuch, Special to The Inquirer
Talent will take you a long way on the basketball court. But without good team chemistry, talent may not be enough to take you the distance. Solebury is a team that usually is blessed with a good amount of talent, but this year's edition has chemistry, talent, and an unselfish attidude that make the Spartans a force to be reckoned with. That chemistry and talent was evident Saturday night when the host Spartans (5-2) defeated Wilmington (3-9), 86-60. It was a balanced scoring attack by Solebury, led by 6-foot, 6-inch senior Rob Windsor, who netted 22 points and had 12 rebounds.
SPORTS
October 9, 1991 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles Barkley huffs and says he is tired. He is tired from the grind of two-a-day practice sessions in training camp, a burden that will end soon, but not too soon for Barkley. "A lot of teams only practice once a day now," Barkley said, "but we have to practice twice a day because we have 10 new guys every year and it takes two hours just to learn everybody's name. " A year ago, Barkley knew the names in the starting frontcourt, and spoke of the sturdy play of Rick Mahorn and the steady influence of Mike Gminski.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Downingtown basketball coach John Walker is the first to acknowledge his team's shortcomings. "We don't have a lot of depth or height or amazing speed, and we don't have any incredible athletes," Walker said. But Walker is also quick to point out his team's biggest strength, an elusive ingredient he calls "chemistry. " That chemistry, combined with tight defense, good shooting and crisp ball movement, carried the Whippets to a 64-63 victory over West Chester East in a key Ches-Mont League matchup Tuesday night.
LIVING
January 2, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
In modern mythology, the piano bar - a staple of B-movie lore and noir novelization - is a lonely place, a dank environment where the detritus of society go to soak sorrows in sour mash while listening to rickety versions of "Melancholy Baby. " Pianist Ted Gerike and the habitues of the Society Hill Hotel on the corner of Third and Chestnut Streets don't know that one. "You know, in 20 years of being here five nights a week, I've never played 'Piano Man,' " jokes Gerike, 67. The hotel (doubling as bed & breakfast as well as bar/eatery)
SPORTS
January 12, 1996 | by John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
The astounding thing about the Chicago Bulls - who are making a mockery of the rest of the NBA - is that going into the season, they had many of the same questions about themselves that others did. But when a team jumps out to a NBA-record 29-3 start and has a legitimate shot at becoming the league's first 70-victory team, potential concerns tend to get placed on the back burner. So for the last 2 1/2 months, while the Bulls have blown through the league, there have been no stories about Michael Jordan losing a step, Scottie Pippen arguing with management or Dennis Rodman acting like a space cadet.
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SPORTS
April 3, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
HOUSTON - Jalen Brunson said he first met Ryan Arcidiacono when he was a junior in high school making an unofficial visit to Villa, but really got to know the Wildcats guard when he came the following year on his official trip. "It was a great visit," Brunson recalled. "Me and Ryan started jelling right away. It was a weird connection as to just how fast we started being able to talk to each other, being able to connect with each other. " Instead of taking the hotel room that coach Jay Wright had provided for him, Brunson crashed that night with Arcidiacono and his roommates.
SPORTS
January 15, 2016 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
They describe their on-court chemistry as "twin telepathy. " And if you didn't know any better, at first glance, you might think Maddie Hahn and Zoe Hahn were actually twins. "They're a year apart, but I can tell you this," said longtime Kingsway coach Karyn Pickard, "they're the tightest sisters I've ever seen in my life. " The Hahn sisters are the star players for a Kingsway girls' basketball squarely among the top teams in South Jersey and the clear favorite in the Tri-County Conference.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
When Jalaal Hayes of North Philadelphia applied to a doctoral program in applied chemistry, even the admissions staff at Delaware State University did a double take. Hayes was but 18. Surely he had mistakenly checked the box next to graduate school. His application was dispatched to the undergraduate division. Eventually, it came back. The teenager, who had graduated from high school at 15, and from college at 18 - with two bachelor's degrees, no less - knew exactly what he was doing.
SPORTS
January 8, 2016 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
The players had to laugh. It was the first thing they noticed when they walked into the visitors' locker room at Paul VI. "We don't know who did it or why it was there," Alexis Santarelli said. "But somebody drew a picture of Mickey Mouse on the board in the locker room. " "It was like he followed us home," Elizabeth Radley added. The Bishop Eustace girls' basketball team didn't literally expect to bring Mickey Mouse back with them from a recent holiday tournament in Disney World.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert A.G. Montgomery Jr., 78, a pioneering Philadelphia educator, died Wednesday, Nov. 11, of complications of Alzheimer's disease at Brookdale Northampton, an assisted-living facility in Richboro. Mr. Montgomery was a chemistry and physics teacher for two decades at Northeast High School, where he began Project SPARC, an after-school program that educated students in aeronautics and related fields. It inspired scores of young Philadelphians to follow careers in science, math, and engineering.
SPORTS
October 12, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer neiburj@phillynews.com
SUNRISE, Fla. - Considering Scott Laughton wasn't a lock to make the Flyers' roster when training camp began, he hasn't had a lot of playing experience with his current linemates, R.J. Umberger and Matt Read. Heck, Laughton, 21, wasn't a surefire Flyer until almost the eve of when the 23-man roster was due at the end of camp. So before Thursday's opener in Tampa, Fla., a 3-2 overtime loss to the Lightning, the trio didn't see much - if any - game action together before the puck dropped at Amalie Arena.
SPORTS
September 22, 2015 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
THE MOST telling thing was the befuddlement. It wasn't reticence. It was genuine. One by one, they stood at their lockers and shook their heads and admitted that they didn't really know what to say. The only answer they could provide was the one that everybody already knew: That they did not have one. That, after 60 minutes of some of the most dreadful offensive football you will ever see out of an NFL team with playoff aspirations, they still had...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Documentaries about science don't really make for ratings winners. Those that are produced seem to focus on a few popular topics - evolutionary biology, medicine, astronomy. Chemistry seems left out in the cold. PBS hopes to change this ugly situation with The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements , a superb three-part documentary about the history of chemistry. It airs in one marathon sitting from 8 to 11 p.m. Wednesday on WHYY TV12. Narrated by Michael Emerson, best known for playing crime-fighting genius Harold Finch on CBS's Person of Interest , The Mystery of Matter provides a historical survey of chemistry from its birth as a distinct scientific field in the 17th and 18th centuries to the establishment of the famous periodic table and the discovery of radioactivity and the existence of subatomic particles.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Rose Monica Katusz, 68, a member of the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia who taught here and did missionary work overseas, died Saturday, May 30, of cardiopulmonary collapse at Assisi House in Aston. She was a professed member of the Sisters of St. Francis for 47 years. Sister Rose Monica was born Kathryn Mary Katusz in Wilkes-Barre, and was reared in Dundalk, Md., where she graduated from the Catholic High School of Baltimore. She entered the convent in 1965 and professed her first vows in 1968.
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