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Chemo

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NEWS
September 6, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nausea that cancer patients sometimes experience after chemotherapy can make the treatment feel worse than the disease. New research from a University of Pennsylvania team looks at the role the brain plays in the nausea and vomiting that follow treatment with cisplatin, a type of chemo used in many cancers. Working with rats, the team, which included psychologists Amber Alhadeff and Harvey Grill plus Bart C. De Jonghe, a nutrition scientist in the School of Nursing, found the severe side effects were associated with a particular neurotransmitter - glutamate - in the amygdala, a part of the brain that processes emotion and memory.
NEWS
October 17, 2012
Through Wednesday, Philly.com and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series will culminate in a special Philly.com/Inquirer section on Thursday, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . Jennifer Bergstrom was just starting her life over. Her six-year marriage in Kansas City had ended, so she took a job that moved her to South Florida. This happened to now be the home of her first love, her college boyfriend, and their love rekindled.
SPORTS
November 21, 2004 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few weeks ago, Triton senior quarterback Mario Barel had a chemotherapy treatment that kept him hospitalized on a Monday. He stayed overnight at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia and returned to Triton's practice field that Tuesday. No big deal, said Barel, 17, who downplays a rare disease he has been battling since his freshman year. "I feel real good. I feel normal," he said in a recent interview. "Nothing is going to cause me not to play. " Well, almost nothing.
TRAVEL
May 2, 2016 | By Nancy M. Alterman, For The Inquirer
It didn't take long to persuade my 23-year-old daughter and her boyfriend to join me on a 14-day Carnival Cruise to the southern Caribbean. Both were reluctant to use all their vacation time for one celebration - my 60th birthday. But with some adjusting, we found a way to make it work. Leaving from Baltimore, we wouldn't need to deal with the hassles of flying or arrive exhausted to get started on a trip of a lifetime. And that it was. From the moment we left, we were silly with joy at our good fortune.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
"What's a brush? What's a comb? What's a bad hair day? Can you please remind me?" Tom Gillin, a bald cancer patient, raps into a mirror with an equally bald doctor at his side. Both are sporting curly blond wigs. "I celebrate my time here," Gillin says later in his music video about life with cancer at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. A 19-year-old who was discharged from the hospital Sept. 12 after five months of care for leukemia, Gillin created a parody rap video to two of Jay Z's songs.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania this week became the 41st state to pass controversial legislation aimed at making oral cancer drugs more affordable for patients. The bill, which passed both chambers of the legislature unanimously Thursday, was headed to Gov. Wolf, whose office said Friday that he would sign it into law. Out-of-pocket costs for intravenous chemotherapy - which requires going to a medical office for infusions - are much lower than patients' costs...
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tiffany Nardella was engaged to be married, living in South Philadelphia, and loving life when she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 35 in 2010. The cancer stuck around, but the boyfriend didn't - gone after the second chemo treatment. "My experience with the breakup, cancer, chemo, and trying to work, pay my mortgage, take care of my house and myself while living alone was daunting and overwhelming," Tiffany said. "I went through a bad period of depression and feeling worthless.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Through Oct. 17, Philly.com and the Inquirer will publish a profile a day of transformative moments reported by breast cancer patients. The full series can be seen at www.philly.com/breastcancer Jessica Territo was diagnosed with breast cancer a month after giving birth. She noticed a little swelling when breast-feeding, and her obstetrician sent her for tests. A needle biopsy revealed Stage Two cancer. She was 33, mother of a newborn and a 3-year-old. Jessica, in South Florida, took the most aggressive path - chemotherapy to shrink the tumor and then surgery to remove it. The chemo was so powerful that it hospitalized her for four days.
SPORTS
June 26, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON and Daily News Staff Writer
SOME PARTIES are more memorable than others. Such was the case Saturday night at a celebration for Tess Fanning, who recently graduated from Archbishop Wood. Among those attending were Bob and Monica Rotzal, whose 21-year-old son Alex is scheduled to undergo chemo on Monday to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Alex, a former manager of La Salle High's crew team, now attends Temple. As is often the case, he was told that with chemo comes hair loss. That gave someone a hair-brained idea, and before you could say James Carville or Telly Savalas, 18 guys — young and old, some jocks, some not — were lined up to have their heads shaved as a show of support.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tom Hawkins first stepped out on the ice and looked around. He found himself one of six goalies trying out for the Monsignor Bonner team in September. Hawkins was feeling nervous and wondering if he was even going to make the team. He was a freshman and hockey was his game, but he didn't expect that kind of a challenge. A month later, Hawkins found out he had a real challenge. He noticed some lumps on his neck and thought he had mononucleosis. He went to the doctors and underwent a battery of tests and found out he had Hodgkins Disease, which is a cancer of the lymphnodes (in Hawkins case around the neck and his chest)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania this week became the 41st state to pass controversial legislation aimed at making oral cancer drugs more affordable for patients. The bill, which passed both chambers of the legislature unanimously Thursday, was headed to Gov. Wolf, whose office said Friday that he would sign it into law. Out-of-pocket costs for intravenous chemotherapy - which requires going to a medical office for infusions - are much lower than patients' costs...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I live with my parents and am not fond of children. My father volunteers me to baby-sit my nieces while they are right in front of us and before I have a chance to discuss anything. If I stand up for myself and say no, my father lays a guilt trip on me and tells the kids that their aunt is "being mean. " I'm grateful that my parents took me in after I graduated from university, which has allowed me to work on a second degree. However, when I am volunteered to do something I don't enjoy -- like entertain the kids -- my father somehow always manages to leave the house.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of Merck rose Thursday after the drugmaker said its Keytruda immuno-oncology medicine succeeded in a study of patients with advanced lung cancer and showed a survival advantage over patients given standard chemotherapy. Based on the results, an independent data monitoring board recommended that the clinical trial be stopped and that patients receiving chemotherapy be allowed to switch to the company's treatment. Merck, based in Kenilworth, N.J., employs about 9,200 in West Point and Upper Gwynedd in Montgomery County.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
IT'S DOUBTFUL that the pint of Fireball cinnamon whiskey was included in the goodie bags of healthy fruit, granola, water, and yogurt distributed to the soggy, ebullient runners at the end of the Blue Cross Broad Street Run. But it was just what the doctor ordered, passed among the sodden, the brave, and the teary-eyed, punchy with cold, fatigue, and memories at the American Cancer Society's DetermiNation tent. If there's any truism about Sunday's Broad Street Run, it's that nearly every runner had a story.
TRAVEL
May 2, 2016 | By Nancy M. Alterman, For The Inquirer
It didn't take long to persuade my 23-year-old daughter and her boyfriend to join me on a 14-day Carnival Cruise to the southern Caribbean. Both were reluctant to use all their vacation time for one celebration - my 60th birthday. But with some adjusting, we found a way to make it work. Leaving from Baltimore, we wouldn't need to deal with the hassles of flying or arrive exhausted to get started on a trip of a lifetime. And that it was. From the moment we left, we were silly with joy at our good fortune.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | Kerry McKean Kelly
Kerry McKean Kelly is on the board of Kelly's Heroes, a New Jersey-based nonprofit that raises money for pancreatic cancer research. It's been a year since my husband, Steve, died of pancreatic cancer at age 55. And still, there's a magnet on the side of our refrigerator with the phone number of the oncology hotline and Steve's wonderful nurse, Ellen. I'm not quite sure why I haven't removed that magnet. It might be that I just can't accept the finality that would bring.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hospitals have made strides in preventing cancer medication errors by learning from terrible mistakes in recent decades, pharmacy experts say. Even so, another teachable moment has arisen from a case first reported by NBC10, in which a potentially lethal chemotherapy overdose was given early this month to a baby at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. "It's a terrible tragedy," said pharmacist Michael Cohen, president of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, a Horsham-based nonprofit that works with clinicians, regulators, and industry to prevent errors.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Philadelphia boy with a rare cancer was given 10 times the correct amount of chemotherapy over a period of five days due to a typographic error by staff at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, according to NBC10. On its website, the station posted what appeared to be a letter to Isaac Harrison's parents acknowledging the mistake, signed by Joan Anders, the hospital's patient-safety officer. In an Oct. 6 report, also posted on the NBC10 website, physician Gregory E. Halligan expressed concern that the boy's bone marrow might not recover and that he could suffer "life-threatening liver or kidney problems" due to the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Selena speaks lupus While we were busy nattering about her love life (to Justin Bieber or not to Justin Bieber ? that was the question), young acting and singing sensation Selena Gomez was undergoing chemotherapy. Gomez, 23, who made a big splash in Barney & Friends as a child actor, tells Billboard she took a break from work last year not to get over Biebs, but for health reasons. "I was diagnosed with lupus, and I've been through chemotherapy. That's what my break was really about," Gomez says.
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