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Chemo

NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tiffany Nardella was engaged to be married, living in South Philadelphia, and loving life when she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 35 in 2010. The cancer stuck around, but the boyfriend didn't - gone after the second chemo treatment. "My experience with the breakup, cancer, chemo, and trying to work, pay my mortgage, take care of my house and myself while living alone was daunting and overwhelming," Tiffany said. "I went through a bad period of depression and feeling worthless.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tom Hawkins first stepped out on the ice and looked around. He found himself one of six goalies trying out for the Monsignor Bonner team in September. Hawkins was feeling nervous and wondering if he was even going to make the team. He was a freshman and hockey was his game, but he didn't expect that kind of a challenge. A month later, Hawkins found out he had a real challenge. He noticed some lumps on his neck and thought he had mononucleosis. He went to the doctors and underwent a battery of tests and found out he had Hodgkins Disease, which is a cancer of the lymphnodes (in Hawkins case around the neck and his chest)
NEWS
January 23, 2012
A small study focused on the big question of whether intravenous Vitamin C fights cancer has yielded "somewhat encouraging findings," some Thomas Jefferson University researchers conclude. Many alternative medicine practitioners are firmly convinced that ascorbic acid infusions work, based on anecdotal cases of remissions and cures. But the evidence remains inconclusive. In the new study, nine patients with advanced pancreatic cancer received intravenous C plus two standard chemotherapy drugs for eight weeks.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
While people commonly think that cancer patients lose weight because chemo makes them so sick, many patients actually have the opposite problem. It is true that some people with end-stage cancer get very thin, but, earlier in the course of treatment, many may find themselves surprised by unwanted flab. Cancer Support Community of Philadelphia has taken on the issue in several programs this winter. One late Monday afternoon will focus on fitness and weight management for cancer survivors.
NEWS
December 28, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER Rita Arnold will not be required to report to prison or post $1 million bail Friday, allowing the former Chester County district judge to continue receiving chemotherapy under the care of her current doctors. In a ruling issued Tuesday, a Superior Court judge set aside, at least temporarily, an order last week that Arnold, 57, must post the higher bail or surrender to begin serving 16 to 32 months for concealing a citation filed against her son. The unnamed judge also gave Arnold's sentencing judge, Senior Judge John Braxton, three weeks to explain why he increased her bail last week from the $100,000 she posted in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011
DEAR ABBY: I have a close friend, "Lindy," who is dying from liver cancer. She could no longer eat or drink even before the chemo was started, and she sleeps most of the time. The chemo has done nothing more for her than make her lose her hair. Lindy is adamant that she'll beat the cancer. To that end, she wants nothing "negative" passed on to outsiders, including her relatives, who live eight hours away. She has no family here except her boyfriend, whom she won't allow to talk to her doctor.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
Through Oct. 17, The Inquirer will mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series will culminate in a special Inquirer section Thursday, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . "2012 was supposed to be my year!" says Amy Kuhnel of Kettering, Ohio. "I recently got engaged to the man of my dreams. We bought our first house together, and I got my dream job. I also turned 40, so I went in February to get my first mammogram.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014
OCTOBER is Breast Cancer Awareness Month - and a call to action to get your annual breast checkup. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the U.S. About 232,670 cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed this year. Megan Donascimento was happily enjoying life when, last fall, the 46-year-old Mount Airy resident was rocked by the news that she had breast cancer. "I was always adamant about getting mammograms because by mother had breast cancer at 34," said the married mom of two teenagers, a daughter, 18, and a son, 17. Her November 2013 diagnosis was "an aggressive, Stage 2 tumor.
NEWS
November 23, 2007 | By Kevin Ferris
Somewhere between a cancer patient's first visit to Berks Hematology Oncology Associates and the time it takes to become a second home, three things become etched onto the heart. The compassion of the staff. The grueling ordeal that is chemotherapy. The photos lining the treatment center's walls. One of the 80 staff members is David Lu, who has spent 4 1/2 years with this private practice within Reading Hospital's Regional Cancer Center. He was born in China 54 years ago, and was in medical school there when his father was diagnosed with bladder cancer.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
Through Oct. 17, Philly.com and The Inquirer will mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series culminates in a Philly.com/Inquirer/Daily News section Oct. 18, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . "I am a huge golfer," says Laura Martin, 53. "I played on the boys' team in high school, in college at Duke University. I play in a lot of local Philadelphia Women's Golf Association events, with a 6 handicap.
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