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Chemotherapy

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NEWS
May 28, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
One dark afternoon in late January, Jane Withstandley threw her arms around her horse, Calvin, buried her face in his sleek, muscular neck and apologized for the random pain of the universe. "I'm sorry," she said. "You don't deserve this. " She fed him some of his favorite treats, wintergreen Life Savers and "stud muffins" - an equine delicacy made of grains and molasses, then she slumped into a pile of straw in the corner of his stall and cried. An hour before, she had learned that Calvin, her stunning 10-year-old thoroughbred, had cancer.
SPORTS
July 12, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Baltimore Orioles outfielder Eric Davis has decided to receive chemotherapy as follow-up treatment for cancer surgery, a process that will take 22 weeks, but won't necessarily end his season. Davis, 35, had a cancerous tumor the size of a baseball removed from his colon June 13. Dr. Keith Lillemoe, who performed the surgery, strongly suggested chemotherapy to keep the disease in check. But Davis wrestled with the idea of receiving chemotherapy, opting to discuss the situation with family and friends before making a final decision.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A team of Minneapolis scientists has developed a genetic testing procedure that may enable physicians to predict which cancer patients are likely to recover after undergoing chemotherapy, the New England Journal of Medicine reports in today's issue. The research findings, for cancer of white blood cells, may have applications for a wide variety of kinds of cancer, said Jorge J. Yunis, the team leader and a scientist at the University of Minnesota Medical School. Yunis will join the staff of Hahnemann University in Philadelphia on July 1. Jeffrey Cossman, a researcher at the National Cancer Institute, said that Yunis' findings are a "significant step forward" in deciding whether chemotherapy will be successful on patients with specific kinds of cancer.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
For some women with the earliest stage of ovarian cancer, there is no need to undergo chemotherapy after surgery, a new study suggests. The study, published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, found that, in cases involving cancer that was confined to the ovaries, the chances of survival were just as good for women who did not get chemotherapy after being operated on as they were for those who went on to get the drug treatment. Dr. Robert C. Young, president of Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia and the principal investigator for the national study, said in an interview that, if a patient is carefully evaluated during surgery to determine the extent of ovarian cancer, "you can define a group of women with this disease who do not require additional therapy and who have a 95 percent survival rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ozzy Osbourne, who could not take the unpleasantness of his wife's first chemotherapy treatment, is going back to Ozzfest sooner than expected. Osbourne left the 2002 tour to be with Sharon while she has chemotherapy treatments in New York for cancer that has spread beyond her colon. He had been expected to rejoin the tour Aug. 22 in Denver. Now, he'll be back on stage Wednesday in Michigan. After being with Sharon for just one treatment, he nearly passed out. His wife decided he'd be better off on the road, so she's sending him back to Ozzfest.
LIVING
June 21, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine this: There are people who look forward to chemotherapy. People like Martha Brooks, a 48-year-old Berks County woman who has been coming to the gynecology "chemo room" at Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania since October for treatment of ovarian cancer. Of course, she's not thrilled about the chemotherapy itself. But she does enjoy coming each week to see fellow patients who have become friends while sitting side-by-side for hours, waiting for big plastic bags of chemicals to empty into their veins.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Burkitt's lymphoma, the type of cancer that 6-year-old Jason Gaes suffered from, is very rare. Less than 3 percent of all children with cancer develop this type, according to Dr. Anna Meadows, senior oncologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's cancer research center. The disease is more common among African children who live in areas of heavy rainfall where malaria is endemic, a phenomenon that doctors cannot explain. In this country, Burkitt's lymphoma, which is characterized by tumors of the abdomen, jaw and lymph nodes, is a "rare, sporadic event," Meadows said.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
When Dominic Carbone was admitted to Graduate Hospital for chemotherapy, he expected the worst. He knew that intense nausea and vomiting almost always accompanied the anti-cancer drug he was to receive. Instead, Carbone, a lung cancer patient, looked so hale that a security guard admonished him, "Visiting hours are over and you'll have to leave. " Carbone assumed he'd be sedated with anti-nausea medication as deeply as the cancer patient in the adjacent bed. "It was a Monday and the man in the next bed said, 'I'm going to say goodbye to you for a while.
SPORTS
December 21, 1999 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
The device on Roger Neilson's left hip does indeed look like a Walkman, as Neilson predicted. But instead of connecting to headphones, it is attached to a plastic tube that leads up Neilson's torso to a patch of adhesive tape under his collarbone, where a catheter is dispensing drugs aimed at fighting Neilson's bone marrow cancer. Neilson, the Flyers' coach, was back at his desk by early afternoon yesterday, also as he predicted, joking as he walked into the team's practice facility with fan services director Joe Kadlec.
SPORTS
December 13, 1999 | by Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
The world finally slowed down yesterday for Roger Neilson and the Flyers, giving them a little time to think. Since the diagnosis of head coach Neilson's bone-marrow cancer, the team had been on the run - flying to Toronto on Friday afternoon, a news conference there that evening, a ragged, emotional 6-4 loss to the Leafs on Saturday night, followed by a late-night charter flight home. Yesterday, finally, there was no practice, no media questioning. Neilson was in his office, of course, because that is where he spends his waking hours, regardless.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Kerry McKean Kelly, For The Inquirer
I am sitting here with tears in my eyes and anger in my heart. I just learned that the cancer clinical trial that my husband enrolled in - gambled on, you could say - didn't work. The data show that the pancreatic cancer patients such as my husband who received an experimental combination of two immunotherapy drugs actually died a few months earlier, on average, than those who received the standard chemotherapy treatment. The results were so disappointing that the trial has been halted.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of Merck rose Thursday after the drugmaker said its Keytruda immuno-oncology medicine succeeded in a study of patients with advanced lung cancer and showed a survival advantage over patients given standard chemotherapy. Based on the results, an independent data monitoring board recommended that the clinical trial be stopped and that patients receiving chemotherapy be allowed to switch to the company's treatment. Merck, based in Kenilworth, N.J., employs about 9,200 in West Point and Upper Gwynedd in Montgomery County.
SPORTS
May 13, 2016 | Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
#Prayfordominic FLETCHER COX does. He's been praying for Dominic since March 7, when he sent a Facebook video message: "I hope you feel better, man. We're praying for you. " The message arrived just hours before doctors operated on the Grade III anaplastic astrocytoma in Dominic's brain. It is a rare, recurring, malignant tumor that turned a 7-year-old sharpshooter into the other kid on Lenape Lane with a wheelchair. Dominic Liples' 5-year-old little brother, Ciarlo, was born with spina bifida.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
JOHN-PAUL DEAN wasn't supposed to compete in the April 19 meet to clinch a ChesMont League American Division track and field championship for Kennett High School unless he absolutely had to. The day before, the 18-year-old senior had struggled to get through practice following three days of chemotherapy at A.I. duPont Hospital for Children. His doctors wanted him to rest whenever possible. That was a bitter pill for John-Paul, a team captain. Kennett hadn't won the championship in a quarter century, but had gotten close for three years running.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | Kerry McKean Kelly
Kerry McKean Kelly is on the board of Kelly's Heroes, a New Jersey-based nonprofit that raises money for pancreatic cancer research. It's been a year since my husband, Steve, died of pancreatic cancer at age 55. And still, there's a magnet on the side of our refrigerator with the phone number of the oncology hotline and Steve's wonderful nurse, Ellen. I'm not quite sure why I haven't removed that magnet. It might be that I just can't accept the finality that would bring.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Nineteen years ago, Elyce Cardonick got a call about a newly diagnosed lymphoma patient whose fast-growing chest tumor was causing severe breathing problems. The cancer patient was 13 weeks pregnant and had rejected her oncologist's advice to abort before starting toxic chemotherapy. Cardonick, a young maternal-fetal medicine specialist then at Jefferson University Hospital , discovered that little was known about treating cancer during pregnancy. The issue became her calling, inspiring her to create the Pregnancy and Cancer Registry to collect data about treatment and long-term results for both mothers and children.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | Alfred Lubrano
I was diagnosed with Stage 4 head-and-neck cancer three days before my wedding last July. If you're wondering which emotion - dread or joy - wins out in a schizophrenic standoff like that, you've never planned a backyard reception with caterers, florists, and 30 guests all scheduled to swoop in before 6 p.m. What happens is, you say, "I do," then kiss the bride. You lock yourself in the bathroom and scream on your own time. With the discovery of a lump in my neck, I'd emigrated to a different country - Cancer-stan, crowded with around 20 million Americans.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
IN THE WEEKS after Pope Francis blessed their ailing daughter during his visit to Philadelphia, Joe and Kristen Masciantonio probably spent more time in the cancer ward at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia than at Mass at St. Cyril of Jerusalem Church in Jamison. But last week, Joe said, scans showed that a troublesome tumor in 1-year-old Gianna's brain shrank significantly after rounds and rounds of surgeries and chemotherapy, to the point where it's "basically gone. " The tot's stunning reversal of fortune - which came after a dire diagnosis from her doctors - led one family friend to call Gianna's encounter with the pontiff "the Miracle on Market Street.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Philadelphia boy with a rare cancer was given 10 times the correct amount of chemotherapy over a period of five days due to a typographic error by staff at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, according to NBC10. On its website, the station posted what appeared to be a letter to Isaac Harrison's parents acknowledging the mistake, signed by Joan Anders, the hospital's patient-safety officer. In an Oct. 6 report, also posted on the NBC10 website, physician Gregory E. Halligan expressed concern that the boy's bone marrow might not recover and that he could suffer "life-threatening liver or kidney problems" due to the error.
SPORTS
October 3, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
If her physical condition allows it, Kathy Urich plans to be in Langhorne on Saturday evening to watch her son Dean and Pennridge take on Neshaminy in a Suburban One League National Conference football matchup. Some days are better than others for the mother of three, who is battling metastatic breast cancer - a cancer that spreads beyond the breast to other organs in the body, in her case the bones. Urich, 54, often experiences extreme back and rib pain caused by lesions. "It's almost like you feel paralyzed," she said.
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