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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there After a busy week of teaching language arts to seventh graders, Liz was ready for happy hour with coworkers from Carusi Middle School in Cherry Hill. Her phone buzzed with a text that said it was from friend Jenna: "Wear something cute. I'm bringing a friend. " What the heck, Liz thought. Her eHarmony matches had been disappointing. Besides, that early evening in February 2011, Liz, who is now 28, needed some lighthearted fun. She had recently been hospitalized for a blood clot in her leg - a random, frightening incident.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | SHARON GEKOSKI-KIMMEL / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Brothers Holden Wolfe, 15 months, and Luke, 3, exchange money with their father, Rob of Mount Laurel, at the Farm Stand exhibit at the Garden State Discovery Museum. The boys had picked some fruit for purchase as part of the exhibit. On Father's Day yesterday, all fathers were granted free admission to the Cherry Hill museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the antiques show sponsored annually by St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church in Cherry Hill, the antiques are almost secondary to the food. That, at least, is what the promoter says. The food, prepared by church volunteers, has been the big draw at the show during its seven-year existence. But collectors won't go hungry for the lack of antiques. At this year's show, at the Cherry Hill National Guard Armory tomorrow and Sunday, they'll find a wide assortment of merchandise: prints, china and glassware, country and Victorian furniture, jewelry and more, offered by more than 40 dealers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey is where the antiquing action is this weekend. At the Holiday Inn on Route 70 in Cherry Hill (across from the race track), the Delaware Valley Antique Dealers Association will hold its 13th annual Antique Show. Jewelry, glass, china, fine linens and some furniture will be among the offerings of the 28 participating dealers. Show hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. tomorrow and 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $2.50. Information: 609-663-5300. Elsewhere in New Jersey, it's the first Sunday Antique Country Show at the Flemington Recreation Center, on Route 31, one mile from the Route 202 circle.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Subaru of America Inc., which has its national headquarters in Cherry Hill, is considering leaving the township, though the mayor says he's working to prevent that. The auto company, based at its Route 70 location since 1986, has indicated to the township that it may move to consolidate operations at a larger facility. While company officials said they have made no decisions, Cherry Hill is confronting the possibility of losing the business — and the $440,210 in property taxes it paid last year.
NEWS
September 5, 2003
Are you a longtime resident of Cherry Hill, or a newcomer? What made you choose the township as your home? How would you describe life in the township or your neighborhood to someone who had just arrived? And how do you envision the future of Cherry Hill and your neighborhood? What will it look like, say, 10 years from now? Send your thoughts in an essay of 300 to 500 words by next Friday to: South Jersey Voices, The Inquirer, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300 Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Cherry Hill's chief prosecutor has resigned his post with the township, the mayor's office announced yesterday. Matthew E. Segal offered Friday to give up his $15,000-a-year part-time job after meeting with Mayor Susan Bass Levin and the township solicitor, Francine Axelrad, a mayoral aide said. The resignation became effective immediately. According to a press release announcing the change, Segal, who is also a Camden County freeholder and runs a one-man law practice in Cherry Hill, will be replaced by Elliot S. Stomel, an assistant prosecutor in Cherry Hill since 1981.
NEWS
September 24, 2002
It is truly absurd for Evie Doherty ("Goodbye, Cherry Hill," Sept. 17) to claim the high road leads to a development in the Pine Barrens, one of our country's most precious natural resources. An "adult community," such as the one in the Pinelands that Doherty says she has moved to, is still sprawl. I am much more concerned about the environmental impact of development in the Pinelands than I am about the traffic on Route 70 in already developed Cherry Hill. So what if Cherry Hill has become a "city"?
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | By John Way Jennings and Lou Carlozo, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Cherry Hill police yesterday said they had no suspects in a rash of incidents in which racist graffiti was spray-painted in about dozen locations around the township in the last week. The most recent appeared yesterday, the letters "KKK" painted on a privacy fence. On Feb. 28, "Save the U.S. Kill Jews" was discovered spray- painted on the road surface in the first block of Downing Street. All the incidents have occurred in the eastern half of the township. Police have few leads, Detective Sgt. Richard Tomlinson said yesterday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 1915 massacre of Armenians by the Ottoman Empire helped influence the family identity of Dr. Edward Tufankjian, born in West Philadelphia in 1927, son Aaron said. "My father's family," Aaron wrote in an e-mail, was "a very close and proud Armenian family that, like many Armenians, came to the U.S. for a better life, to escape the Armenian genocide, where they lost most of their family. " St. Gregory the Illuminator Armenian Apostolic Church in Roxborough was consecrated in May 1967 and, his son said, Dr. Tufankjian "was one of the original members that helped build St. Gregory's.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saladworks, the 108-store chain that pioneered vegetable-based restaurant franchising, has been acquired by Centre Lane Partners L.L.C., a New York buyout firm. Centre Lane agreed to pay $16.9 million to the Conshohocken company's owners and creditors to acquire the chain, and to spend an initial $2 million "to help us accelerate growth" and update the stores, Saladworks CEO Paul Steck said. "We will be adding new products - upscale cheeses, organic greens, antibiotic-free poultry, quinoa," and boosting headquarters and field staff to 22 from 15, Steck said.
NEWS
June 12, 2015
CITY COUNCIL this week advanced a package of bills that raises taxes to provide an additional $70 million in aid to the School District of Philadelphia. Only it doesn't. A provision nestled in one of the bills would divert $25 million of the $70 million to Council's own budget to be held hostage, as it were, until the district satisfies Council that it is doing the right thing when it comes to unspecified items. Neither Council President Darrell Clarke nor other members have said publicly what they want.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Allison Steele and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
The New Jersey Economic Development Authority approved $164 million in tax credits Tuesday for Voorhees-based American Water Works to encourage the company to relocate to Camden. If American Water Works takes the deal, the company would consolidate current offices in Mount Laurel, Voorhees, Cherry Hill, and Haddon Heights in a new facility to be built in the Gateway District, near Campbell Soup Co. and the future site of Subaru Corp. of America, which last year announced plans to move from Cherry Hill.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert E. Querubin, 83, of Seminole, Fla., a programmer for Radio Corp. of America in the 1960s, died of diseases related to aging Saturday, May 30, at Freedom Square Rehabilitation & Nursing Services there. He lived with his family in Cherry Hill from the 1960s to the late 1980s. Born in Chestnut Hill, Mr. Querubin graduated from La Salle College High School in 1949 and, with a full scholarship, earned a bachelor's degree in English literature at La Salle University in 1953. "He started his own computer systems programming company in the late 1950s, in Philadelphia," daughter Cecile said.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District is poised to pay a Cherry Hill firm up to $34 million to provide substitute teachers for its classrooms over two school years. Expected to be enacted later this month, the move to privatize 1,324 jobs will save the school system $10 million annually and mean fewer lost learning opportunities for students, officials said. But the action has already ignited controversy. Outraged over the outsourcing of substitute spots and other positions now held by its members, the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers has planned informational pickets for Friday.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before M. Allan Vogelson became a judge in 1995, he sometimes dined in Atlantic City in the early 1980s with Pete Rose, who was the Phillies' first baseman from 1979 to 1983. They shared the table with Carol Woliung, who in 1984 would become Rose's second wife. They were dining at the Playboy Hotel & Casino because Woliung was a Bunny waitress there. And because Vogelson's wife, Sandra, was, as she wrote in her resumé, " 'Bunny Mother,' the executive in charge of over 400 Playboy cocktail and dealer Bunnies.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Camden Municipal Court's chief judge, Steven P. Burkett sought to balance empathy and forgiveness - values he held as a devout member of Cherry Hill's Congregation M'kor Shalom - with meting out punishment to domestic abusers and drunken drivers. In court, friends and family said, he tried to teach life lessons to such defendants, even while handing down punishment. "He felt he needed to make a connection," said Judge Burkett's older brother, Bob. The absence of Judge Burkett in the courtroom this week, following his sudden death Sunday, had those who knew him remembering his careful approach, as well as the decade he spent working to make the court more efficient.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The novelist Joe Samuel Starnes forsook Philadelphia's Fishtown so he could live closer to Westmont's Green Valley Tennis Club. "I live about a mile from here," Starnes, 48, says. "I'm very fortunate to have found this place. I've made the best group of friends here, on and off the court. " His third commercially published work of fiction is set in rural Georgia; it's not a roman a clef about Green Valley. But as I quickly learn during the private club's open house Saturday, Green Valley has stories to tell, too. "Frank, may he rest in peace, was an absolutely wonderful man," says Jerry Ehrlich, recalling Frank J. Verdi, the Haddonfield dental surgeon who founded Green Valley.
SPORTS
May 21, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The new hockey coach is under an enormous amount of pressure. He is taking over a team that has a long tradition of winning and is used to selling out its state-of-the-art building. The new coach's fan base is also craving a long overdue championship. "A ton" of pressure, Brad Berry admitted Tuesday during a telephone interview from North Dakota. "The standards and expectations are very high, but I don't think I'd want it any other way. " You may not have heard of Berry before, but he is quite familiar with Dave Hakstol, the new hockey coach who grabbed the local headlines when he was hired by the Flyers on Monday.
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