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Chesilhurst

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NEWS
March 1, 1989 | By Rebecca Barnard, Special to The Inquirer
George Joseph Phillips Sr., 59, the first black mayor of Chesilhurst and a man who risked personal attack to do what he thought was best for his community, died Thursday at West Jersey Hospital-Berlin after a short illness. Some people are remembered as "not having an enemy in the world," but that was not true of Mr. Phillips, said his son, George Jr. As mayor, his father "spoke what he felt," his son remembers, and that made him some enemies. "He wanted Chesilhurst to be self-sufficient and honest.
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chesilhurst, the poorest town in Camden County, is in danger of losing a $2.4 million loan to build a sewer system because neighboring Waterford has refused to sign an agreement allowing the tiny borough to hook into its sewage-treatment plant, Chesilhurst's mayor said last night. Edward J. Wanzer, mayor of the 1.8-square-mile Pinelands town, told the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority that Chesilhurst would sue the authority unless it forced Waterford to accept Chesilhurst's waste or found the borough an alternative.
NEWS
September 13, 1986 | By Jane Lenel, Special to The Inquirer
The Chesilhurst Borough Council voted Thursday night against Mayor Edward J. Wanzer's proposal to sue the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority for not enforcing its regional sewage system plan. Nearby Waterford, which is part of the plan, has refused to link its treatment plant with Chesilhurst, thereby jeopardizing a $2.4 million federal loan to Chesilhurst to build a sewer system. Council members of Chesilhurst, which is the poorest municipality in Camden County, said they believed the borough could not afford the $10,000 that would be required to take legal action against the utilities authority.
NEWS
June 11, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Chesilhurst, by far the smallest of the seven feeder districts in the Lower Camden County Regional School District, has been the only municipality to oppose the breakup from the start. "The regional was a favorable setup. It brought all the students together," said Leonard Binowski, Chesilhurst's superintendent. The 1.7-square-mile borough of about 1,500 residents is outnumbered 23 times by the regional's largest feeder town, Winslow, which has 34,000 residents. And, according to the 2000 census, Winslow is growing while Chesilhurst is shrinking.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
A fugitive from a Cumberland County halfway house surrendered without incident Tuesday night in Trenton, a state spokesman said. Lamont White, 36, had escaped overnight Sunday from Kintock House in Bridgeton, said Matt Schuman, a Department of Corrections spokesman. He was found in Trenton and was persuaded to surrender, Schuman said. White, of Chesilhurst, was serving time for criminal homicide and related offenses in connection with a 2004 robbery in which the 63-year-old victim, whose head hit the pavement after White punched him in the face, later died.
NEWS
April 30, 1996 | By Cathleen Egan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the 1800s, there used to be a section of Waterford Township called Chesilhurst. It was just a small slip of land, but folks liked the cozy arrangement. By 1887, the residents of that small section were itching to become independent of the large, rural Waterford. So they seceded and formed the tiny Borough of Chesilhurst on the border between Winslow and Waterford Townships. Now, 109 years later, Chesilhurst residents and leaders are fighting to keep their autonomy. This time, however, their effort is not over the borough's borders, but, rather, whether their schoolchildren should be educated out of town in the Waterford School District.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years after Chesilhurst closed its lone elementary school to bus its children to neighboring Winslow Township, residents of the borough will be asked whether they want to end the arrangement in a court-ordered voter referendum next week. A small, predominantly African American community on the edge of the Pine Barrens, Chesilhurst has been the scene of a long-running legal battle aimed at reopening its elementary school. "Most of the people would rather have their kids in town.
NEWS
October 7, 1987 | By Jane Lenel, Special to The Inquirer
A hundred years ago, Chesilhurst was a boom town. Mapped out for real estate development in 1884, the area was besieged by speculators selling lots for $20 each the following April, the West Jersey Press reported. By 1886, several dozen dwellings were in place and the area boasted a hotel and a store, according to a local history. There was a stage coach stop, and trains were stopping at the Camden and Atlantic Railroad Depot, offering access to both Philadelphia and the Jersey shore.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Three men were killed and two other people injured in a series of attacks outside bars and nightclubs in South Jersey and Philadelphia over the weekend. Camden County authorities were searching Sunday for the attacker in the fatal stabbing of a 44-year-old man late Friday night in Chesilhurst. The attack on Francis Ponetta, of Chesilhurst, happened in the parking lot of Manny's Last Chance Saloon, in the 200 block of the White Horse Pike. Ponetta was stabbed in a leg shortly before 11 p.m., according to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
William A. Boone Jr., 82, of Chesilhurst, a retired U.S. Postal Service employee who was a dedicated family man and church volunteer, died Tuesday, Dec. 30, of congestive heart failure. After a routine morning that included a piping-hot cup of coffee brewed just the way he like it, breakfast, and a round of his favorite card games on the computer, Mr. Boone died quietly at the Erial home of his daughter, Minretta B. McFadden. "He kept saying, 'I'm looking for that ace,' " his daughter said with a laugh.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony G. Furgione worked for the New York Shipbuilding Co. in Camden during spells when he was laid off from the Budd Co. in Philadelphia. In those times, "he learned to weld, using a mirror," his son Gerald said. "He was one of the few welders that was able to get in and do detail work where a man couldn't crawl in. " On Saturday, April 5, Mr. Furgione, 93, of Chesilhurst, mayor of that Camden County borough for 17 years, died at his home. Mr. Furgione was mayor in the 1960s and 1970s, his son said.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she retired as clerk and controller of Stratford in 1997, the town elders named the place where she had worked for 40 years the Dorothy Carlson Borough Hall. "She loved it," her son, Barry, said. "It was by far the appropriate gift. " When she turned 100, a physician at Kennedy University Hospital in Stratford questioned her, her son said, "to assess how sharp she was. " And when he asked in what town they were at the moment, she answered, "What town? We're in my town.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
EZEKIEL Tomboyeke had fled his native Sierra Leone during a civil war that claimed tens of thousands of lives, including family members. He was able to come to the United States, where he found work, lived among relatives, and felt safe. But Saturday night, police say, a driver struck Tomboyeke on Pump Branch Road in Winslow Township, Camden County, as he was walking home after work. He was hit about 11:20 p.m. Township police said the vehicle went partly off the road, struck Tomboyeke and kept going.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Three men were killed and two other people injured in a series of attacks outside bars and nightclubs in South Jersey and Philadelphia over the weekend. Camden County authorities were searching Sunday for the attacker in the fatal stabbing of a 44-year-old man late Friday night in Chesilhurst. The attack on Francis Ponetta, of Chesilhurst, happened in the parking lot of Manny's Last Chance Saloon, in the 200 block of the White Horse Pike. Ponetta was stabbed in a leg shortly before 11 p.m., according to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
On the label of Daisy Smith's signature applesauce, several essential ingredients aren't listed. But you can almost taste them. "Determination, perseverance, hard work, and love," says Smith, whose sauce is featured at Momma's Home Made, her new Voorhees takeout. Set between a grocery store and a gold exchange in the modest Southgate Plaza on Haddonfield-Berlin Road, Momma's Home Made celebrated its grand opening Monday. The menu is soul food with a fresh twist and a light touch.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years after Chesilhurst closed its lone elementary school to bus its children to neighboring Winslow Township, residents of the borough will be asked whether they want to end the arrangement in a court-ordered voter referendum next week. A small, predominantly African American community on the edge of the Pine Barrens, Chesilhurst has been the scene of a long-running legal battle aimed at reopening its elementary school. "Most of the people would rather have their kids in town.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
A fugitive from a Cumberland County halfway house surrendered without incident Tuesday night in Trenton, a state spokesman said. Lamont White, 36, had escaped overnight Sunday from Kintock House in Bridgeton, said Matt Schuman, a Department of Corrections spokesman. He was found in Trenton and was persuaded to surrender, Schuman said. White, of Chesilhurst, was serving time for criminal homicide and related offenses in connection with a 2004 robbery in which the 63-year-old victim, whose head hit the pavement after White punched him in the face, later died.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years after Chesilhurst's lone school shut down, Carla Ortiz is left to guess where her children will attend class from one year to the next. Next fall, she's heard, they could be sent to the Berlin School District, they could still be in Winslow, or they might even be back in Chesilhurst. "They never should have closed the school," Ortiz said. The issue of what to do with Chesilhurst's youngest students remains unresolved, tied up in court proceedings, local politics, and negotiations involving New Jersey's top education officials.
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